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Found 66 courses.

Career & Technical Education CTE)

Animation in the Home Studio (beginning)
Stefan Gruber, 1st Semester 2020-21
Zoom! : Mon/Thu 9:00-10:15

CTE - Animation Tech Graphics 1 / 0.5

https://seattleschools.zoom.us/j/91530038833?pwd=QUc4NTBEV09EL0tVQ0ViUEh1YUlnZz09
Passcode: Homestoo

How can your home environment be transformed into an animation studio? What little part of your space can you dedicate to training yourself to be an animator in the home studio? What materials do you have and what materials can you search for access to and what materials do you hope nova can help provide to make your animation growth goals possible? A basic agreement in this class is to make a space into your own home studio and to develop ideas and content for your own animation piece.

Careers
Jennifer Spigner, 1st Semester 2020-21
virtual : Tue/Fri 9:00-10:15

CTE - Career Connections 1 / 0.5

The world of careers has many paths to explore and also gain professional skills in the process.
Are you interested on how to find and keep a job?
Come to this class and you will become workplace ready to look for jobs and opportunities.

Identify careers based on assessments on interests and skills
Career Research
Identify personal skills, interests and abilities and relate them to current career choices.
Present information to class on career interests
Essential Careers during covid
Resume building
Interviewing Skills
21st Century Skills
Employment Law
Health and Safe in the workplace
Workplace Readiness Skills:Professionalism, Communication, Collaboration, Adaptability, Technical
Leadership and Community Skills

Digital Music (Beats!)
Annie Parker, 1st Semester 2020-21
Mon/Thu 10:30-11:45

CTE - Recording Arts Tech 1 / 0.5

Generously sponsored by Foundry 10. Facilitator(s): Jake

Students in this course will learn how to make music with Ableton Live and Push, and gain foundations in the physics and science of sound and digital audio. Concepts in this course can be translated to video, storytelling, and many types of programming, all while having fun making beats and music. Each student will have access to a digital workstations to create original music. Additionally, students will learn to record, perform, sequence, and manipulate sound.

Nova Farm
Susan Barth, 1st Semester 2020-21
Where ever you are : Mon/Thu 1:25-2:45

CTE - Env Horticulture 1 / 0.5

In this class, you will experience botany, horticulture, farming, and social justice around food. The plan is to get every student growing and caring for plants, cooking, creating and carry out inquiry based experiments to support your learning, learn about environmental issues surrounding agriculture and do projects catered to your interests, including leadership, internships, and career paths.

This class can be taken for Occ. Ed. and can cross credit with science.

This class can also earn college credit if you are prepared to meet the extra competencies.

Each student will participate in a leadership project. A graduation Social Justice Project could be done in this class.

Open Portal (advanced animation)
Stefan Gruber, 1st Semester 2020-21
Zoom! : Mon/Thu 1:25-2:45

CTE - Animation Tech Graphics 2 / 0.5

Zoom meeting link

Meeting ID: 932 3384 5516
Passcode: Soup

This is an advanced animation group and meant to be a support space for people engaged in an animation project in their established home studio. Prompts and shared project goals will be met as a group and the overall goal will be to help shape the aniamtion department for nova for a new future.

Work Credit Support-Semester 1
Jennifer Spigner, 1st Semester 2020-21
Virtual via zoom : Wed 1:25-2:45

CTE - Hospitality Worksite / 0.5

Work-based learning activities extend the classroom into the workplace, connecting acquired knowledge and skills to a student’s future employment. Each student’s individual learning objectives, or goals will be articulated in the first meeting among the student, their suprevisor, and the WBL coordinator(me). They will be different for each student.

I will enter these goals after the first meeting.

Committee

Action Faction
Eyva Winet, 1st Semester 2020-21
zoom until further notice : Thu 11:55-12:40

SS - Student Government / 0.13

Action Faction Mission Statement:
As an all-inclusive committee, we work to create a safe and respectful community for all genders and sexualities. We combat sexuality and gender identity oppression by creating positive actions in Nova and beyond. Positive actions include maintaining safe spaces for discussions, resources and events. We believe that any social justice movement must work towards inclusion of other social justice goals. We recognize that all oppressions are connected and in no way do we want our actions to propagate other forms of oppression.
Competencies

plan and execute social justice projects that support organizations efforts to end gender and sexuality injustice
learn about power and privilege
explore the interdependence of multiple oppressions
create and execute our own projects that will work toward gender and sexuality injustices
find levity and joy in this hard work
spread sass and camp to the world

All School Event Planning
Eyva Winet, 1st Semester 2020-21
zoom for now : Tue 11:55-12:40

UE - Leadership / 0.15

We will organize and/or support the days we are in school but regular classes are not meeting (Fall Conference, Winter Conference, Consent Day, Racial Justice Conferences, Black Lives Matter in Schools Week, All School Meetings with interesting presenters and artists and more! We will work directly with lots of other committees to make this happen but we will be the folks who do the organizing work, collect and use community feedback and build our community contacts. We need tech savvy people to make this work virtually this year, we need artists, we need organizers and activists, we need people with community connections, we need people who care about this community and want to make it even better, we need YOU!!!!!

Taking on organizing one of these events could be part of your Culminating Inquiry Project/Adam Project/Senior Project and definitely will involve community service hours and skills that will build a college and job resume.

Open house, orientations, curriculum night and tours are organized by Recruitment and Community Building Events like video game socials, karaoke and dances are organized by The Guild.

Collage Committee
Allison Sterrett, 1st Semester 2020-21
Zoom : Fri 11:55-12:40

UE - Student Activity / 0.15

Collage Committee is a calm space to connect with peers while working on individual art pieces

Debate Committee (Live) Tues/Thurs 11:55am
Lance Brown, 1st Semester 2020-21
Live online : Tue/Thu 11:55-12:40

UE - Leadership / 0.25

OUR MISSION:
Debate Committee connects, supports, and inspires a diverse community
committed to empowering students through competitive speech and debate

Dungeons and Dragons
The Dark Knight Batman, 1st Semester 2020-21
Rm 102 : Fri 11:55-12:40

UE - Student Activity / 0.25

This committee is devoted to playing the incredible role playing game – Dungeons and Dragons. Each Friday we will come together and play. Create a character! Run a campaign! No experience necessary at all. We will teach you how to play. Must be willing to get along with others (or be willing to learn how to), show up unless you have an incredibly good excuse, and certainly have the capacity to have fun.
Also, if you don’t have dice or source books, don’t worry about it. We have some extra you can borrow for the day.

Clearly, we will be doing this online.

Guild
Lydia Wynn, 1st Semester 2020-21
Zoom : Wed/Thu 11:55-12:40

None assigned

To create community events that promote community building throughout Nova.

Mothership
Michelle Vecchio, 1st Semester 2020-21
Thu 11:55-12:40

SS - Student Government / 0.25

Students will participate in Mothership, the Nova student governing body.

Students will engage in civic participation and discussion.

Students will represent their coors.

Nomic
Stefan Gruber, 1st Semester 2020-21
Zoom : Thu 11:55-12:40

None assigned

Nomic is a game that begins with very few rules:
1. Whoever gets 100 points wins.
2. On your turn, roll a d6 and add the result to your score.
3. Players can propose and vote on new rules, including 1, 2, and 3.

The game is constantly transforming as new rules are added. Have an idea on how to make the game run smoother? Have a new fun idea on how to earn points? Have a sneaky idea on how to give yourself an edge? See if you can get your rule passed!

Join Zoom Meeting

https://seattleschools.zoom.us/j/95088453785?pwd=TmhCU2cvWDVXK2Jxcm45ZUtUSjl4UT09

Meeting ID: 950 8845 3785
Passcode: 100points

Nova Mixcloud Project
Jared Harkness, 1st Semester 2020-21
Zoom! : Wed 11:55-12:40

None assigned

We will discuss and share music centered around different themes. We will then work together to build playlists based on those themes to post on the website Mixcloud, a website which hosts various DJ mixes and radio shows. My hope is that we can then share these mixes with the Nova community as a sort of make-shift Nova radio station, but we can discuss that idea further in the committee!

Oops! I Arted
Julia Reade, 1st Semester 2020-21
Zoom : Tue 11:55-12:40

None assigned

Each Tuesday, we will come together to quietly engage in a creative practice of our choosing. Participants might draw, paint, collage, mold clay, or…? We will begin each session by setting intentions and close each session with the option to share what we’ve been working on. Participants may choose to work on or off camera. I will play mellow music in the background that individuals can mute should they choose to. As the school year progresses, we will take requests from the Nova community that can be creatively fulfilled during our time together. This will also be a space held to gently work on and build social connections with peers.

Peace of Mind - LIVE
Akil Srinivasan, 1st Semester 2020-21
LIVE - Virtual : Fri 11:55-12:40

PE - Individual/Dual Activity 1 / 0.15

We will practice weekly formal mindfulness meditation. No experience necessary! Many studies show that daily meditation can help us deal with a host of mental health issues such as anxiety and depression and help with stress reduction as well!

PE credit also available

POC Committee
Melissa Park, 1st Semester 2020-21
Melissa's virtual room 101 : Tue 11:55-12:40

SS - Student Government / 0.25

This governing committee, the People of Color Committee (POCC), is a meeting place for students and staff who identify as people of color.

We’ll talk as a committee at the start of school to determine if we want to continue meeting once or twice a week, and if the latter, what day will be our 2nd meeting of the week. We meet to build community and hold space for POC students and staff to reconnect with each other, develop and grow our leadership skills, and discuss issues of race and equity in a safe and open environment.

Past projects have included our organizing of coat & warm clothing drives in the winter, field trips, pot-lucks, host movie nights, collaborate with local organizations, and program teaching events for the school. Additionally, students rotate facilitation duties of weekly committee meetings & short- and long-term projects.

On Tuesdays we are especially focused on citizenship teaching and learning (e.g. POCC is one of several governing committees which give input to our administrators for Nova’s Mission/Vision C-SIP School Improvement Plan (an official document generated annually by Nova’s administrators that sets goals, enrichment, instructions programs, students’ achievement, and assessment of the school, and is published on our school’s SPS website).

Recruiting for Recruitment Committee
Debbie Kuttner, 1st Semester 2020-21
Zoom Rm 220 : Wed 11:55-12:40

UE - Leadership / 0.25

This is an activity time to build up Nova community. Students interested in joining Recruitment or wanting to understand it better can come here to learn about Recruitment, but this is an community building activity for new and returning students. Anyone welcome every week or once a semester or something in between!

Recruitment Committee
Debbie Kuttner, 1st Semester 2020-21
Zoom 220 : Tue/Thu 11:55-12:40

UE - Leadership / 0.25

Recruitment Committee oversees the functioning of all recruitment-related activities here at Nova. In particular, this committee can make decisions that effect how Nova is going about bringing new students into our community as well as how we are perceived by those potential new recruits.

We need students in order to be a school! And we need people to know about Nova and want to come here in order to get those students! Basically, Recruitment is essential to the survival of Nova and all that we are doing here.

Decisions are made through consensus-building whenever possible.

Remotely Outdoors Together
Adam Croft, 1st Semester 2020-21
Zoom and the outside world : Wed 11:55-12:40

None assigned

Let’s get outside! This is a community building activity committee in which we’ll remotely connect through Zoom as we each safely explore the world outside our doors. We’ll draw, take pictures, share observations, and simply share time together as we remotely explore the outside world “together”.

Videogame Social
Jared Harkness, 1st Semester 2020-21
Fri 11:55-12:40

None assigned

This INVITE ONLY committee is a structured, student-lead committee designed to offer students an opportunity to further develop their social skills. The group will gather around a common interest—gaming—and engage in discussions about this topic while engaged in collaborative gaming.

Walk the Planet Nova Farm
Jennifer Spigner, 1st Semester 2020-21
Zoom and the outside world : Fri 11:55-12:40

None assigned

This committee will be co-facilitated by Susan, Jennifer, and Adam.

In pre-pandemic times, the Walk the Walk and Planet Nova committees took on many tasks to improve the Nova school building and its surrounding neighborhood, especially regarding environmental justice/responsibility/sustainability. Meanwhile, the Nova Farm class tended to Nova’s garden area as students learned horticultural skills. Walk the Planet Nova Farm will attempt to combine as many of these efforts as we can. Let’s discuss and take steps to improve our local communities, including through gardening, litter pick-up, and other steps we come up with together. This will also be a place for us to build community as we navigate this remote school year. Join us — it’ll be fun!

Wellness Steering Committee
Eyva Winet, 1st Semester 2020-21
zoom : Wed 11:55-12:40

UE - Leadership / 0.15

We will be meeting regularly with the folks running the new Nova Wellness Center to help build, improve and expand their services for Nova students and the community. We have already helped architects design the temporary space but will continue to advise for the permanent space. We have helped hire staff for the space but will also give feedback and support their understanding of Nova and our amazingly diverse students. We agreed to help them get student art and interesting pieces to decorate the space so we need folks who are willing to make or curate art. We will also be working on grant writing to get more services and expand the possibilities of what the wellness center can offer.

Join us! We need your voice to drive this work. Country Doctor is very happy to collaborate and take guidance from students so we need you all to show up and make this center truly work for youth!

There are opportunities to work on culminating inquiry projects, health credit, CTE credit, peer education, grant writing, internships in the health field connected to this committee!

Yoga
Allison Sterrett, 1st Semester 2020-21
Zoom : Wed 11:55-12:40

UE - Student Activity / 0.15

Dedicate a bit of time each week to move your body and decompress. No experience necessary! We will be showing yoga videos and making our own wellness goals.

Elective

Room of 1,000 crafts
Debbie Kuttner, 1st Semester 2020-21
Zoom 220 : Fri 11:55-12:40

UE - Student Activity / 0.25

Whomever as who shows up in zoom 220, they shall find what they require. translation from silly scroll language: we can do arts & crafts, play video games, knit, crochet, learn cooking from each other, or whatever you bring to the table…. er, zoom room.

Fine Arts

Art Portfolio/Sketchbook Creation (asynchronous)
Becky Laird, 1st Semester 2020-21
Secret Asynchronous Location on the World Wide Web : Wed 10:30-11:45

ART - Multimedia 1 / 0.5

Students will have the opportunity to identify areas of interest and work on developing their skills in this asynchronous class. Students will participate in weekly office hours with school staff to review progress, share resources, and set learning goals for the upcoming week. Additionally, students will develop some way to share their learning with the Nova community.

Independent contracts have specific competencies related to each contract. Students will meet with staff overseeing the contract and with content area specialists to ensure appropriateness of competencies. Independent contracts are an opportunity for students to seek out knowledge and skills independently with the collaborative support and guidance of school staff.

Character Design (all levels)
Stefan Gruber, 1st Semester 2020-21
Zoom! : Mon/Thu 10:30-11:45

ART - Drawing / 0.5

https://seattleschools.zoom.us/j/92820877531?pwd=cW5SSE54NVRaZ1JwOExhcXpIOW1WUT09

Meeting ID: 928 2087 7531
Passcode: Vibes

In here we’ll approach character design from many directions. From live drawing portraiture to looking deeply at the designs of characters we love, copying and inventing our own characters and trying to reinvent for ourselves what a character even is. Does a character have to be depicted as a living being? Can a concept be a character? Can the concept of a character be the main driving force behind the design? What is more important, form, function, fun, or formula?

Eye of the Beholder (asynchronous)
Becky Laird, 1st Semester 2020-21
Secret Asynchronous Location on the World Wide Web : Wed 01:25-02:45

ART - Exploring the Arts / 0.5

Students will have the opportunity to learn about contemporary artists of color and artists of color that historically have been excluded or marginalized in art history classes. Students will identify a series of artists and complete weekly projects to demonstrate their learning. Students will participate in weekly office hours with school staff to review progress, share resources, and set learning goals for the upcoming week. Additionally, students will develop some way to share their learning with the Nova community.
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Independent contracts have specific competencies related to each contract. Students will meet with staff overseeing the contract and with content area specialists to ensure appropriateness of competencies. Independent contracts are an opportunity for students to seek out knowledge and skills independently with the collaborative support and guidance of school staff.

Fine Arts / Science

Art of Wriitng Digital Independent
The Dark Knight Batman, 1st Semester 2020-21
On-line

LA - Creative Writing / 0.5

In this class you will work to learn how to build your stamina for writing creatively. You will be given three writing prompts a week that you will attempt to write to. The prompts are designed to get you to both think and write differently than you may have done so in the past as well as to get you to think outside of the box.
You will be writing mostly short stories, but there will be poetry and letters and e-mails and other fun things.
You will attempt to write at least thirty completed pieces (some of the pieces are 26 words long and every single one of them will be a first draft), put them into a portfolio (a file), do a self-assessment of your writing, and send it all to me. During the course of the class you will BE REQUIRED TO CHECK IN WITH ME ONCE/WEEK TO GIVE ME A STATUS UPDATE. You are also more than welcome to request a zoom meeting or send me e-mails to ask me any questions you wish.
More than anything you should have fun fun fun. The prompts are quirky. They don’t take themselves too seriously and the great thing about every single prompt is you get to write what you want!

Health

Gender Tea
Eyva Winet, 1st Semester 2020-21
zoom for now byot (bring your own tea) : Fri 11:55-12:40

UE - Personal Growth / 0.25

Gender Tea
Is the gender binary getting you down? How about the gender hierarchy? Tired of other people telling you what your identity is or should be or that your doing it wrong? Want to drink tea and chat with other rad people who want to talk about gender, sex and sexuality in a safe and supportive space? Want to imagine space where all bodies are safe, free and celebrated? Want to work toward creating that here and now? Everyone is welcome and encouraged to come as long as you can agree to the safety norms grown in the group.

We will also be reading books this semester. Talk to Eyva about Health or other kinds of credit.

Health Asynchronous.
Susan Barth, 1st Semester 2020-21
Where ever you are : Tue/Thu 12:20-13:45

HE - Health Education HS / 0.5

You will be exploring deeper meaning and connections within your physical, mental and social well being and how to relate them to yourself, those close to you and your local and global communities. You will gain a holistic understanding of how to recognize when aspects of your health are out of balance, how to create safe practices surrounding your health and the choices you make. You will explore what is needed to keep your body, identity and community healthy. You will work on positive goal setting around your health and aspects that may affect it. You will create ways in which you can empower yourself in your own health and take positive action.

Communicating Ideas in Health
Students will be able to share and teach information that they have gathered on issues of importance for their own health.
The student can create traditional presentations of information. i.e. research posters and/or presentations
The student can create non-traditional presentations of information. i.e. artistic responses, games, coloring books, comic books, technology, etc.
The student can communicate understanding to peers, experts and laypersons.
The student will use technology to communicate, educate and call to action for conservation projects. This will include websites, blogs, social media etc.

Times are weird and we are building this new educational system together. Your participation and input are valuable.

Language Arts

Freshfolks - Ethnic Studies
The Dark Knight Batman, 1st Semester 2020-21
102 : Mon/Thu 9:00-10:15

LA - 9A Intro to LIT & COMP / 0.5

This class can only being considered for LA 9A and it counts as an ethnic studies class.

WARNING: THERE WILL BE NO CELL PHONES ALLOWED IN THIS CLASS. IF YOU CAN’T DEAL WITH THAT IT IS GOING TO BE A LONG SEMESTER. IF YOU TAKE A CELL PHONE DURING CLASS WITHOUT PRIOR PERMISSION FROM YOUR COORDINATOR YOU WILL BE MARKED AS ABSENT FOR THE DAY. AT YOUR 7TH ABSENCE YOU WILL LOSE HALF OF YOUR CREDIT.

This Freshfolks class is designed to orient and introduce you to how Nova works and what language arts classes are like here. As the course title suggest, we hope to move from inquiry (how to pose inquiry and to take ownership over your learning) to understanding (understanding Nova norms and inquiry-based approach to teaching and learning). During the class you will read stories, a novel, watch films and documentaries, and practice your philosophical, writing, and communication skills. You will write an essay, a research paper, and at least one piece of creative writing (a story or poem). You will also do a book project (not report).
Additionally, as you experiment with writing in different genres, you will learn something about analyzing a text (i.e., a story, poem, film, or image) and how to give an account of how something means what it does (or what you think it does). Students in this course will be encouraged to read and reflect on their own ideas and experiences and then examine these ideas in relation to the films and other texts we read and analyze together.

Since this is an ethnic studies class you will be learning more about who you are and where you came from in the context of intersectionality. We will read Ibram Kendi’s book, How to Be an Antiracist, and both examine and put into practice what it would mean to do this kind of work. We will be decentering “whiteness” and exploring the various narratives that exist in this country that contribute to the very way we behave, act, and feel.

Our goal for the semester will be to read, write, think, and discuss things that matter most to us. In other words, we want to find things we care about and then talk and write about them together. We will strive to develop an inquiry community where we can respectfully share, discuss, and critique our ideas and the ideas of others. We will push each other to think carefully about our beliefs and assumptions about the world as well as how we’ve come to understand the world and ourselves in particular ways. With an eye toward these ends, students will engage in daily, meaningful reading, writing, speaking, and listening tasks in English class and at home.

Playwriting
Brian Neel, 1st Semester 2020-21
Mon/Thu 10:30-11:45

ART - Theatre 8/Playwriting / 0.5; LA - Creative Writing / 0.5

Facilitator: K. Brian Neel

Students in this class can receive either LA-Creative Writing credit or FA-Theatre 8/Playwriting credit.

This playwriting class will equip you with tools for creative self-expression, endowing self-confidence and the sense that ideas—about yourself, the world, and the challenges you face—matter. Your voice will be heard. All aspects of writing for the theater will be explored, including character, story, conflict, genre, driving action through dialogue, and the power of the unspoken word. There will be much improvisation and game-play. We will write quickly and fearlessly in an atmosphere of risk taking, with positive and constructive feedback.

Poetry (Asynchronous + 1 weekly synch meeting)
Melissa Park, 1st Semester 2020-21
Melissa's virtual room 101

LA - Poetry / 0.5

This asynchronous class will have a minimum once a week meeting online—ON WED’S, 1:25-2:45—please attend for important weekly check-ins, discussions, writing circle, and sharing [i.e. building and holding a poetry space of listening, discussion, writing; it’s optional/not required to share your writing in this space].

https://seattleschools.zoom.us/j/93319579418?pwd=TU96RjU2bnIyRXl6RUdPeURSYWJRUT09

Passcode: metaphor

This is a class about the power of language to heal, to incite, to inform, to describe, to express feelings. It has two main goals: to practice/learn how to read poetry for meaning and purpose, and to write your own poems. Writing, after all, is a form of thinking—about your life, about your world. Imagine what’s possible when one develops a regular (even daily) practice of writing, for yourself. To get good at it also requires that you read—A LOT. This builds your “ear for language” muscles, your growing breadth of human experiences as expressed in others’ stories/words, and growing your awareness of/engagement with all kinds of experimental, beautiful, wacko, rhyming, narrative, heartfelt, and powerhouse literature out there waiting to be read—and a reminder that you can always be part of that world too.

Major goals for the class are turning in a portfolio of 16 original poems written this semester AND a portfolio of 20 analyses of other people’s poems (you will have lots of time in class to do these). This semester I am changing the format of how students can share their analyses/interpretations of poems—and will post details here ASAP. Students will still be required to lead one seminar in front of the class that lasts 15-20 minutes.

Expect to read and discuss A LOT of poems to explore a range of how poets in different places and eras have used language to describe the “unsayable” in their lives. Expect to really use your ears and listening skills to develop a feel for the music, tone, and rhythm in others’ poetry and our own. Expect to sit with big questions most all humans face. Expect to work on strategies to push through frustrations with writing. We’ll do writing games, exercises from prompts, and experiment with various poetic forms. Taking this class means you’re expected to actively participate in building and sustaining a writing community—one that cultivates sincerity, respect for others, mindfulness, and really listening.

We may do ‘poetry field trips’ to read and write outdoors and/or in different settings, and co-create a group poetry project that could look like hosting an open mic or poetry reading at or away from school, or a class poetry ’zine or cd, or something else entirely. Look forward to awesome guest poets and workshops. Whenever possible, students are also encouraged to participate in Youth Speaks Seattle writing circles, open mics, and local slams.

Senior Literature and Composition
Debbie Kuttner, 1st Semester 2020-21
Zooom Rm 220 - Debbie's room : Wed 9:00-10:15

LA-H / 1

In “Senior Literature” this semester we will be reading/viewing a number of works that might draw from the following list, but will be discussed and fully planned in the first Wednesday meeting. Some possibilities: The Poisonwood Bible, Frankenstein,The Color Purple, The Good Earth, A Farewell to Arms, Madame Bovary, Their Eyes Were Watching God, Oedipus Rex, A Doll’s House, Our Town. There will be a long list of supplementary reading for people who choose to read more. Students who take this class should be really strong readers (reading with eyes or ears is fine with me) and ready for group discussions.
In the and Composition component there will be essay writing opportunities brought up all the time during discussions and off-screen time.
Students will hopefully already have knowledge and experience with all forms of essay: thesis statements, transitions, dialogue; introduction, body, and conclusions; and also, the stages of writing: pre-writing, graphic organizers, drafting, self revisions, peer revisions, editing and polishing. The purpose of this class is to enhance and hone these skills through practice with writing, reading, peer editing, and class seminars. This class will have a heavy emphasis on creating a writers’ community and developing/individualizing one’s own expectations/requirements.
Students will hopefully seminar an essay, part of a novel, a short story, or something else of their choosing.

Some Films
The Dark Knight Batman, 1st Semester 2020-21
Room 102 : Tue/Fri 10:30-11:45

LA - 12B Comparative Lit & Comp / 0.5

This is an ethnic studies class.
CONTENT AND PHONE WARNINGS: THIS CLASS WILL DISCUSS ISSUES OF RACE, POWER, PRIVILEGE, GENDER, EQUALITY, DEATH, LIFE, FREEDOM, CONTROL, BEAUTY, AND REALITY. DO NOT TAKE THE CLASS IF ANY OF THESE ISSUES WILL BE TOO DIFFICULT FOR YOU TO MANAGE.
NO CELL PHONES WILL BE ALLOWED IN CLASS. YOU WILL BE COUNTED ABSENT IF YOU PULL YOURS OUT WITHOUT PERMISSION. IF YOU CAN’T DEAL WITH THIS THEN DO NOT TAKE THE CLASS.
We will study different types of story arcs and archetypes through viewing and discussion different films and documentaries. Each film will have a project that will be due for it, and will be created within the context of the film and discussion in class. Some of the films we MIGHT watch are:
“Get Out”
“Boyz in the Hood”
“Black Klansman”
“Children of Men”
“Yojimbo”
“I Am Not Your Negro”
“Moonlight”
“The Big Sick”
“Smoke Signals”
“Reel Indian”
“Do the Right Thing”
“Set it Off”
“Get on the Bus”
“No Country for Old Men”
“When We Were Kings”

and many others. If you are interested in films and/or stories this would be a good class to take.

Virtual Fries
Debbie Kuttner, 1st Semester 2020-21
Zoom Rm 220 - Debbie's room : Tue/Fri 1:25-2:45

LA - 12B Comparative Lit & Comp / 0.5

Take your passion(s) and make one huge semester-long inquiry project that is all about: Social Justice, Educating Others, Research, Writing, and Presenting. We will build a community together where everyone in the room will be getting credit for their service learning, and senior inquiry project and presentation (and maybe more!).
If you are looking for a senior class, sign up and we can make this class be your … how to get into college, write lengthy research papers, finish your credits for graduation, or all-around joy-infused senior year extravaganza!

YouTube Philosophy
The Dark Knight Batman, 1st Semester 2020-21
on-line

LA - Literature & Philosophy / 0.5

Youtube Philosophy
This digital philosophy course will reside solely on youtube.com. Each video can be accessed through youtube. I will give you the links so that you can either click on them or copy them into your browser.
The purpose of this course is for you to gain some understanding around the following ideas:
- What is philosophy? What is it for? What does it do?
- What are its three/four branches?
- How does philosophy apply to your life and the lives of others? How is it relevant to you?
- Who were some philosophers and what did they believe?

You will receive a new “lesson” on Monday and Wednesday of each week. By the end, you will know a lot about philosophy and what you think, feel and believe.

Language Arts / Fine Arts

Meesh English Language Arts Independents
Michelle Vecchio, 1st Semester 2020-21

None assigned

This contract is set up so students can do independent contracts facilitated either by me or someone in the student’s life who is an expert in the field in which they are setting up the contract.

Read, Write, Communicate
Debbie Kuttner, 1st Semester 2020-21
Zoom Room 220 Debbie's Room : Mon/Thu 10:30-11:45

LA - 12B Comparative Lit & Comp / 0.5

Some days we will read; some days we will write; and, some days we will communicate with one another about what we are doing and make plans for upcoming writings and readings. Did you like to read in your past, but don’t make time for it now—come to this class. Have you always wondered what it would be like to try and write a novel—come to this class. But you can be a non-reader, a non-writer, or you can be a lover of biographies, history, science and read that! And you can be a writer of essays, poetry, screenplays, and yes, you can write any or all of those. We will co-create the semester to make it work for everyone who shows up. Regular attendance will be imperative to earning credit!

.h4 Heading 4 Competencies
#A. Engagement with community— we will not only talk about what we have been reading and writing, but also engage in the creation of a writers community, a book club—whatever works for us.
#B. Self-assessment/growth. you can set your own goals at the beginning of the semester, Debbie will help you along the way. This class might be very structured to meet your needs, or maybe you’ll thrive in a lack of structure.
#C. Technical/Communication Skills. We will use google docs and slack for the writing and reflecting parts.
#D. Gathering of materials/resources. We will decide as a class how to share the readings and writings.

I cannot wait!

Language Arts / Social Studies

Future Visions of Uprisings: A Nova Staff Collaboration - Asynchronous WH
Michelle Vecchio, 1st Semester 2020-21

SS - American Government & Economics / 0.5; SS - Humanities H (Inquiry Project) / 0.5; SS - World History 3 / 0.5

This is an asynchronous, self-paced class.
Course materials will be available on Schoology.
Students can check in weekly at 3:00pm on Thursdays.

Hum Indies Comp Support
Michelle Vecchio, 1st Semester 2020-21
Tue 3:00-3:50

None assigned

Tuesday at 3:00

Students will work on independents and any missing competencies to fulfill credits in classes previously taken.

Students can work on assignments in currently scheduled classes.

Humanities in Synch: A Working Space
Michelle Vecchio, 1st Semester 2020-21

None assigned

Students enrolled in synchronous humanities classes looking for a working space, a little support, or time to decompress with some good humanities folks, can come to this zoom space on Thursdays from 4pm to 5pm.

WoW: Womxn of Words (ES)
Melissa Park, 1st Semester 2020-21
Melissa's virtual room 101 : Tue/Fri 1:25-2:45

LA / 0.5; WHist / 0.5

Stories make us, and as one writer has said, “are the only thing we have.” What are your stories? Who tells the stories of who you are, or stories about you? What are the stories you tell about you? What are the stories by and about womxn who came before us and/or are writing and creating today? What are their narratives of joy and freedom? What are yours? What are their unique past and ongoing stories of fighting for greater justice and rehumanization of themselves and of all people? What are and may be yours?

This is a new ethnic studies-humanities class that will explore the work of womxn writers/storytellers, writing their own lives and narratives, as well as examining through intersectional lenses the stories told about them. Students can earn LA or WH credit depending on what competencies they work to demonstrate throughout the semester. It is open to all students.

Expect to:
-read/listen to/watch (independently and in class) texts of all kinds. There’s an astounding wealth of poetry, essays, short fiction, non-fiction/history, songs, films, novels, memoirs and more that we’ll dive in to.
-read at least one book and create a book project.

-write at least one essay or short research paper through a draft process – with lots of support at each step!
-write/keep a journal for this class, of your own stories, reflections, poetry, etc.

-host/co-host a mini-seminar on a topic and/or writer of your choice
-discuss and reflect on what you read.
-do research; create and share projects of your learning in various forms.
-engage in cycles of reflection and action.
-deepen your understanding of intersectionality (the idea that individuals have individual identities that intersect in ways that impact how they are viewed, understood, and treated) and why it matters in people’s lives in the US, globally, and in your own.

More info to be posted here asap.

Mathematics

Financial Algebra (Asynchronous)
Lance Brown, 1st Semester 2020-21
Live online - scheduled meetings : Tue/Fri 10:30-11:45

MA - Financial Algebra 2 / 0.5

Independently driven research to support students to make connections to
Practical Money Skills and Real-World Mathematics.

In this class we will alternate between the personal and the general. We will learn the everyday skills adults need to establish a budget, bank, save and borrow money, and pay local and national taxes. At the same time, we will be exploring the finances of the country. Just as we look at our own budgets, we will explore the topic of balancing the federal budget and learn about the issues that surround the federal deficit. As we explore the distinction between “wants” and “needs” in our own budgets, we will examine the choices our own country makes in its military spending. As we explore the way taxes are taken out of paychecks (FICA) we will look at the structure and sustainability of Social Security and Medicare. We will explore income tax models comparing fixed-amount taxation to flat/proportional taxes, to the progressive tax model.

This is a math course for students who learn best by doing. It has been designed for those who “think with their hands” and who like to use math in real situations from the get go. We will do many labs and short term projects in this course. In addition to the math, we will be working throughout on problem solving skills, communication skills, and the ability to work on a team, the three attributes employers say are the most important to them.

Financial Algebra 1 is the first semester of a year-long course for students who have completed Algebra I and Geometry. This course can serve as the third credit of math for students who elect to take an alternative for the third year requirement through a counselor supported approval process. This course is also appropriate for students who have completed Algebra 2 and want to take a course specifically focusing on the mathematics of personal finance. The objectives of this course are not equivalent to the objectives for Algebra 2. Financial Algebra combines algebraic and graphical approaches with practical business and personal finance applications. Students explore algebraic thinking patterns and functions in a financial context. Students achieve success by offering an applications based learning approach incorporating Algebra 1, Algebra 2, and Geometry topics, and by connecting math to the real world. This course is designed to build upon prior knowledge of math concepts from other courses. This algebra-based course features real-world algebra concepts found in banking, credit, income taxes, insurance, and household budgeting. Step-by-step strategies will help students learn the time value of money, how to evaluate the purchases and consumer contracts, and how to build a business plan by knowing costs, profits, and break even points.

Financial Algebra (Live) Tues/Fri 10:30 am
Lance Brown, 1st Semester 2020-21
Live online : Tue/Fri 10:30-11:45

MA - Financial Algebra 1 / 0.5

In this class we will alternate between the personal and the general. We will learn the everyday skills adults need to establish a budget, bank, save and borrow money, and pay local and national taxes. At the same time, we will be exploring the finances of the country. Just as we look at our own budgets, we will explore the topic of balancing the federal budget and learn about the issues that surround the federal deficit. As we explore the distinction between “wants” and “needs” in our own budgets, we will examine the choices our own country makes in its military spending. As we explore the way taxes are taken out of paychecks (FICA) we will look at the structure and sustainability of Social Security and Medicare. We will explore income tax models comparing fixed-amount taxation to flat/proportional taxes, to the progressive tax model.

This is a math course for students who learn best by doing. It has been designed for those who “think with their hands” and who like to use math in real situations from the get go. We will do many labs and short term projects in this course. In addition to the math, we will be working throughout on problem solving skills, communication skills, and the ability to work on a team, the three attributes employers say are the most important to them.

Financial Algebra 1 is the first semester of a year-long course for students who have completed Algebra I and Geometry. This course can serve as the third credit of math for students who elect to take an alternative for the third year requirement through a counselor supported approval process. This course is also appropriate for students who have completed Algebra 2 and want to take a course specifically focusing on the mathematics of personal finance. The objectives of this course are not equivalent to the objectives for Algebra 2. Financial Algebra combines algebraic and graphical approaches with practical business and personal finance applications. Students explore algebraic thinking patterns and functions in a financial context. Students achieve success by offering an applications based learning approach incorporating Algebra 1, Algebra 2, and Geometry topics, and by connecting math to the real world. This course is designed to build upon prior knowledge of math concepts from other courses. This algebra-based course features real-world algebra concepts found in banking, credit, income taxes, insurance, and household budgeting. Step-by-step strategies will help students learn the time value of money, how to evaluate the purchases and consumer contracts, and how to build a business plan by knowing costs, profits, and break even points.

Fulfilling Math - Monday Check-In
Lydia Wynn, 1st Semester 2020-21
Zoom : Mon 3:00-3:50

MA - Algebra 1A / 0.5; MA - Algebra 1B / 0.5; MA - Algebra 2A / 0.5; MA - Algebra 2B / 0.5; MA - Geometry A / 0.5; MA - Geometry B / 0.5

For students who have not received full credit in a previous or required math class. We will explore what hasn’t worked for them in past math classes and create an alternate pathway to help student find their definition of success Students who haven’t found success in previous math classes should have been in high school for at least 2 years

The purpose for this class is to fulfill any math competencies that have not previously been met. This will be student driven and project based.

Fulfilling Math - Thursday Check-In
Lydia Wynn, 1st Semester 2020-21
Zoom : Thu 3:00-3:50

MA - Algebra 1A / 0.5; MA - Algebra 1B / 0.5; MA - Algebra 2A / 0.5; MA - Algebra 2B / 0.5; MA - Geometry A / 0.5; MA - Geometry B / 0.5

For students who have not received full credit in a previous or required math class. We will explore what hasn’t worked for them in past math classes and create an alternate pathway to help student find their definition of success Students who haven’t found success in previous math classes should have been in high school for at least 2 years

The purpose for this class is to fulfill any math competencies that have not previously been met. This will be student driven and project based.

Integrated Math (LIVE) - Mon/Thu
Akil Srinivasan, 1st Semester 2020-21
Virtual World : Mon/Thu 1:25-2:45

MA - Algebra 1A / 0.5; MA - Geometry A / 0.5

This is the first of typically 2-4 semesters of foundational math competencies in modelling and abstraction of algebraic and geometric patterns. We’ll emphasize the connections among algebra and geometry, interweaving the traditional concepts taught in Algebra 1 and Geometry. This integrated approach will support students in gaining a deep understanding of key math concepts, how they’re connected, and development of one’s own mathematical identity. Through these concepts/skills we will center the experiences and historical contexts in mathematics of People of Color, development of mathematical concepts through critical narratives of POC. We will explore how math is intimately connected to social justice and movements of resistance and liberation.

This course is appropriate for anyone in the early part of their high school math career, typically students who have not taken any high school math or have taken in Algebra 1A and Algebra 1B in other settings. If a student has already met Foundational math competencies in Algebra 1A, 1B, and Geometry A, B, they should enroll in Financial Algebra, Math Analysis, alternate 3rd year math, or math independents. The Fulfilling Math course (Lydia/Math) is an alternate 3rd year math for students who have not received full credit in a previous or required math class. We will explore what hasn’t worked for them in past math classes and create an alternate pathway to help student find their definition of success.

Credit in Tinysis: Will be fulfilled based on the competencies demonstrated. Typically 0.5 total in a mix of Algebra 1A/1B and Geometry A/B. The breakdown and total credit may be more or less depending on competencies demonstrated

In addition to the mathematics content, students are expected to

  • listen with respect to another person’s explanation;
  • provide help when asked;
  • ask for help when needed;
  • play an active role in sustaining a safe and encouraging learning space for one another; and
  • treat all materials gently so that they may be reused.

Integrated Math (LIVE) - Tue/Fri
Akil Srinivasan, 1st Semester 2020-21
Virtual World : Tue/Fri 1:25-2:45

MA - Algebra 1A / 0.5; MA - Geometry A / 0.5

This is the first of typically 2-4 semesters of foundational math competencies in modelling and abstraction of algebraic and geometric patterns. We’ll emphasize the connections among algebra and geometry, interweaving the traditional concepts taught in Algebra 1 and Geometry. This integrated approach will support students in gaining a deep understanding of key math concepts, how they’re connected, and development of one’s own mathematical identity. Through these concepts/skills we will center the experiences and historical contexts in mathematics of People of Color, development of mathematical concepts through critical narratives of POC. We will explore how math is intimately connected to social justice and movements of resistance and liberation.

This course is appropriate for anyone in the early part of their high school math career, typically students who have not taken any high school math or have taken in Algebra 1A and Algebra 1B in other settings. If a student has already met Foundational math competencies in Algebra 1A, 1B, and Geometry A, B, they should enroll in Financial Algebra, Math Analysis, alternate 3rd year math, or math independents. The Fulfilling Math course (Lydia/Math) is an alternate 3rd year math for students who have not received full credit in a previous or required math class. We will explore what hasn’t worked for them in past math classes and create an alternate pathway to help student find their definition of success.

Credit in Tinysis: Will be fulfilled based on the competencies demonstrated. Typically 0.5 total in a mix of Algebra 1A/1B and Geometry A/B. The breakdown and total credit may be more or less depending on competencies demonstrated

In addition to the mathematics content, students are expected to

  • listen with respect to another person’s explanation;
  • provide help when asked;
  • ask for help when needed;
  • play an active role in sustaining a safe and encouraging learning space for one another; and
  • treat all materials gently so that they may be reused.

Integrated Math (Live) Mon/Thurs 10:30am
Lance Brown, 1st Semester 2020-21
Live online : Mon/Thu 10:30-11:45

MA - Algebra 1A / 0.5; MA - Geometry A / 0.5

The focus of the course is to build on the students’ concrete reasoning experiences developed in
earlier grades. The course includes the following units of study: the real number system and its properties;
algebraic expressions, linear equations and inequalities; identifying and modeling functions, including
qualitative, linear, inequality, quadratic, exponential, absolute value, square and cubed root,and step
functions; systems of equations; translations of functions; identification of roots (zeros) and their significance;
arithmetic and geometric sequences; polynomials; factoring; quadratic equations; and the analysis of statistics
data. The use of calculators is an integral part of this course and graphing calculators (TI84+) is suggested.

Math Analysis (M/Th 1:25)
Lydia Wynn, 1st Semester 2020-21
Zoom - https://seattleschools.zoom.us/j/93528450415?pwd=RVhydjNzUEw3ejg5WWdHU25VSlN6dz09 : Mon/Thu 1:25-2:45

MA - Algebra 2A / 0.5; MA - Pre-Calculus A / 0.5

Intended for students who would traditionally sign up for Algebra 2 or Pre Calculus.

This course will encourage students to compile previously learned mathematics tools to take them to a deeper level of problem solving and analysis. We will work with the deeper nuances of functions and what they communicate about various scenarios. We will specifically look into functions from a calculus perspective in preparation for the next step in mathematics study. Intended for students hoping to go to college or pursue a STEM field.

Math Analysis (M/Th 9:00)
Lydia Wynn, 1st Semester 2020-21
Zoom - https://seattleschools.zoom.us/j/84632461507?pwd=M0JlcEJBU25yZHBvZmFrM3VCTmp4dz09 : Mon/Thu 9:00-10:15

MA - Algebra 2A / 0.5; MA - Pre-Calculus A / 0.5

Intended for students who would traditionally sign up for Algebra 2 or Pre Calculus.

This course will encourage students to compile previously learned mathematics tools to take them to a deeper level of problem solving and analysis. We will work with the deeper nuances of functions and what they communicate about various scenarios. We will specifically look into functions from a calculus perspective in preparation for the next step in mathematics study. Intended for students hoping to go to college or pursue a STEM field.

Math, STAT!
Michelle Vecchio, 1st Semester 2020-21
Mon/Thu 1:25-2:45

IEP - Basic Math 2A M / 0.5

Math, STAT! Learning Objectives

We will consider how statistics can help us understand, process, and analyze information in the world around us and can help us make predictions about the unknown.
We will look at our lives, our communities, and our school, and write math stories and represent data using visuals and computation.
We will develop an understanding that the interpretation of data can be biased.
We will discuss how to question how information is presented, how we can assess the validity of data, and how statistics can be used to uphold power structures.
We will grow our practice, our confidence, and our community together.

Physical Education

Choose Your Own Wellness Adventure!
Julia Reade, 1st Semester 2020-21
Tue/Fri 1:25-2:45

None assigned

Choose Your Own Wellness Adventure will provide students with the support and structure needed to effectively explore, select, implement, and reflect on their own individual wellness routine. We will meet twice weekly as a whole group. Each class meeting will involve a short segment of teacher-lead instruction followed by opportunities for students to share ideas, ask questions, and discuss activities. Each class meeting will also include screen-free time during which students are invited to choose from a menu of wellness activities to be completed during the screen-free portion of class. We will close each class meeting by coming back together for final thoughts.

Important Note: Every person has different levels of comfort being on screen, speaking on camera, and expressing themselves in the remote learning format. Please know that I will never expect anyone to perform an exercise on screen or communicate using one method. We will work together to make sure all voices are heard in a way that is most comfortable for each individual.

Science

Ecological Explorations
Adam Croft, 1st Semester 2020-21
Zoom and the outside world

None assigned

What can we learn by going outside and giving attention to the living beings with whom we share our neighborhoods and planet? In this self-paced course, students will develop and practice skills of ecological science in the outside world accessible outside their doors.

This will be a self-paced (asynchronous) course. I will use our Schoology page to post assignments and projects that you will be able to access on your own schedule. Students will be expected to check in with at least once per week to discuss progress and to pose and answer questions. If pandemic conditions allow, we might also schedule occasional whole- or partial-class meetings at various Seattle parks. However, please expect most, if not all, outdoor explorations to be done independently.

This course will focus upon developing skills in the practices of scientific inquiry, including skills in research, observation, experimentation, and communication. Some skills will be specific to ecological science, while many will be applicable to any area of scientific inquiry.

This is a project-based course in which students will develop inquiry projects based upon their own particular questions and interests.

This course will enroll a maximum of 27 students.

Science Competencies

Students will engage in sustained student-centered and -driven inquiry, which will demonstrate their ability to:

Practice scientific scholarship:
- pose meaningful questions, gain knowledge, and communicate understanding of natural and physical systems;
- design, carry-out, and communicate (in writing, orally, graphically, and other media) research, including scientific, historical, and civic.

Develop scientific practice:
- practice sustained observation of natural and physical systems, including intentional use of imagination in support of perception;
- design, carry-out, assess, and communicate field and/or laboratory experiments;
- model natural and physical systems and communicate understanding of both model and real-world systems.

Participate in community scholarship and action:
- communicate effectively to a group of peers and elders their inquiry process, content, and creative outcome.

Experimental BioSci TF 10:30-11:45
Susan Barth, 1st Semester 2020-21
Where ever you are : Tue/Fri 10:30-11:45

SC - Biology A / 0.5

This class will include, scientific questioning, inquiry based science, research, modeling of systems and creating experiments, studies and projects. You will hone your experimental skills, creating experiments to further your learning and expand your mind. This class will highlight scientific questioning, building experimentation, research, creating reports on experiments and studies. You will observe the natural world and create studies surrounding this observation. You will collaborate with classmates and share your knowledge.

Times are weird and we are building this new educational system together. Your participation and input are valuable.

Physical Science (ASYNCHRONOUS)
Akil Srinivasan, 1st Semester 2020-21
Virtual World : Mon/Tue/Wed/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

SC - Chemistry A / 0.5; SC - Physics A / 0.5

This is an integrated Physics and Chemistry ASYNCHRONOUS course, so we do not meet live Think of it as a guided independent with weekly structure, but without live meetings. During the Guided Independent blocks on the course schedule, you can schedule a meeting with Akil to check in on anything related to this course.

Physical Science is a course journeying through the essential themes, concepts, models, laboratory skills, mathematics and thinking processes that characterize a microscopic (atomic and molecular) and a macroscopic (large-scale) understanding of the physical world. There will be math, home labs and explorations, research projects and philosophical and ethical projects. If you hate these things this is not the class for you. If you like theories of the universe, time travel, questions of reality and perception, energy, movement, matter and MATH, then this is the class for you.

I hope to do some video demonstrations in the science lab in the Nova building, and develop kits or ways of doing home labs. There is math and writing in this course so get ready to use your whole brain!

This class emphasizes creating a context for physical science by understanding the history, philosophy, multi-ethnic perspectives, ethics, applications and relevance of physics and chemistry.

If you have not finished at least 2 years of high school equivalent math – Foundational competencies in Algebra 1 and Geometry – then you and your coordinator need to check in with Akil before enrolling.

Credit in Tinysis: Will be fulfilled based on the competencies demonstrated. Typically 0.5 total in a mix of Physics A/B and Chemistry A/B. The breakdown and total credit may be more or less depending on competencies demonstrated

Seminar

Advance Seminar in LGBTIAQ+ History and Culture Curriculum
Eyva Winet, 1st Semester 2020-21
zoom for now : Tue/Fri 9:00-10:15

None assigned

This seminar will be designed and co-facilitated by staff and students of multiple genders and orientations who come together with past knowledge and experience studying, exploring, learning and/or teaching about LGBTQIA+ culture and history. We are starting a process that will create curriculum that will be used by the whole district. Students and staff will be actively researching and creating lessons to teach each other, designing a format to share this work, creating a digital space to keep resources and potentially sharing it with other schools.
This project will start this semester but will continue and folks can join for just this semester or commit to continue to develop this work next semester. We will likely be training students and teachers from other schools over the summer and continuing this work into the fall.
There are potentially all kinds of competencies, college and job resume gems, culminating inquiry projects and even the opportunity for paid stipends depending on how into this project you want to get.

Social Studies

Future Visions (WH/Sci) T/F section
Adam Croft, 1st Semester 2020-21
Zoom, for now : Tue/Fri 9:00-10:15

None assigned

What future would you like to help create? How can historical and scientific understanding help us to make sense of the present so as to create a just and humane future? In a time of profound and over-lapping challenges to individuals, communities, nations, and the world at large, students in this course will develop and practice skills of historical and scientific inquiry to develop possibilities and pathways for the futures they would like to bring into being.

We will meet through Zoom, every Tuesday and Friday morning between 9:00 and 10:15. We will also make every effort to mix up our time together so that you’re not staring at a screen for the duration of every class session.

This course will focus upon developing skills in research, writing, discussion, and scientific inquiry. Students seeking World History credit will emphasize development of the practices of historical inquiry, including posing authentic inquiry questions, analyzing dominant and critical narratives, identifying and accessing relevant sources of information, and synthesizing research into historical understanding through writing and discussion. Students seeking Science credit will emphasize development of the practices of scientific inquiry, including skills in research, observation, experimentation, and communication.

This is a project-based course in which students will develop inquiry projects based upon their own particular questions and interests. We will also regularly engage in whole-class activities, including readings, discussions, films, guest speakers, and activities suggested and/or led by students.

This course will enroll a maximum of 27 students.

World History Competencies

Students will engage in sustained student-centered and -driven inquiry, which will demonstrate their ability to:

Practice historical scholarship:
- pose meaningful questions, gain knowledge, and communicate understanding of historical inquiry, including racism, historical inequity, relevant policies, collective and individual actions to address injustice;
- critically analyze texts and people for their use of dominant narrative and implicit bias;
- research complex topics and articulate arguments that take into account multiple divergent points of view;
- find and evaluate primary and secondary resources for bias;
- engage in the writing process, including planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

Transform understanding into action in the world:
- identify, problem-solve, and take action toward a social justice challenge.

Participate in community scholarship and action:
- communicate effectively to a group of peers and elders their inquiry process, content, and creative outcome.

Science Competencies

Students will engage in sustained student-centered and -driven inquiry, which will demonstrate their ability to:

Practice scientific scholarship:
- pose meaningful questions, gain knowledge, and communicate understanding of natural and physical systems;
- design, carry-out, and communicate (in writing, orally, graphically, and other media) research, including scientific, historical, and civic.

Develop scientific practice:
- practice sustained observation of natural and physical systems, including intentional use of imagination in support of perception;
- design, carry-out, assess, and communicate field and/or laboratory experiments;
- model natural and physical systems and communicate understanding of both model and real-world systems.

Participate in community scholarship and action:
- communicate effectively to a group of peers and elders their inquiry process, content, and creative outcome.

Future Visions (WH/Sci) W/F section
Adam Croft, 1st Semester 2020-21
Zoom, for now : Wed/Fri 9:00-10:15

None assigned

What future would you like to help create? How can historical and scientific understanding help us to make sense of the present so as to create a just and humane future? In a time of profound and over-lapping challenges to individuals, communities, nations, and the world at large, students in this course will develop and practice skills of historical and scientific inquiry to develop possibilities and pathways for the futures they would like to bring into being.

We will meet through Zoom, every Tuesday and Friday morning between 9:00 and 10:15. We will also make every effort to mix up our time together so that you’re not staring at a screen for the duration of every class session.

This course will focus upon developing skills in research, writing, discussion, and scientific inquiry. Students seeking World History credit will emphasize development of the practices of historical inquiry, including posing authentic inquiry questions, analyzing dominant and critical narratives, identifying and accessing relevant sources of information, and synthesizing research into historical understanding through writing and discussion. Students seeking Science credit will emphasize development of the practices of scientific inquiry, including skills in research, observation, experimentation, and communication.

This is a project-based course in which students will develop inquiry projects based upon their own particular questions and interests. We will also regularly engage in whole-class activities, including readings, discussions, films, guest speakers, and activities suggested and/or led by students.

This course will enroll a maximum of 27 students.

World History Competencies

Students will engage in sustained student-centered and -driven inquiry, which will demonstrate their ability to:

Practice historical scholarship:
- pose meaningful questions, gain knowledge, and communicate understanding of historical inquiry, including racism, historical inequity, relevant policies, collective and individual actions to address injustice;
- critically analyze texts and people for their use of dominant narrative and implicit bias;
- research complex topics and articulate arguments that take into account multiple divergent points of view;
- find and evaluate primary and secondary resources for bias;
- engage in the writing process, including planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

Transform understanding into action in the world:
- identify, problem-solve, and take action toward a social justice challenge.

Participate in community scholarship and action:
- communicate effectively to a group of peers and elders their inquiry process, content, and creative outcome.

Science Competencies

Students will engage in sustained student-centered and -driven inquiry, which will demonstrate their ability to:

Practice scientific scholarship:
- pose meaningful questions, gain knowledge, and communicate understanding of natural and physical systems;
- design, carry-out, and communicate (in writing, orally, graphically, and other media) research, including scientific, historical, and civic.

Develop scientific practice:
- practice sustained observation of natural and physical systems, including intentional use of imagination in support of perception;
- design, carry-out, assess, and communicate field and/or laboratory experiments;
- model natural and physical systems and communicate understanding of both model and real-world systems.

Participate in community scholarship and action:
- communicate effectively to a group of peers and elders their inquiry process, content, and creative outcome.

Uprisings (AGE/WH)
Adam Croft, 1st Semester 2020-21
Zoom, for now : Mon/Thu 9:00-10:15

None assigned

People around the country and the world are rising up to demand justice and safety for themselves, their communities, and those most harmed by unjust institutions and systems of power. Students in this course will inquire into the immediate and longer-term histories of these uprisings, as well as the possibilities for change.

We will meet through Zoom, every Monday and Thursday morning between 9:00 and 10:15. We will also make every effort to mix up our time together so that you’re not staring at a screen for the duration of every class session.

This course will focus upon developing skills in research, writing, discussion, and civic action. Students seeking World History credit will emphasize development of the practices of historical inquiry, including posing authentic inquiry questions, analyzing dominant and critical narratives, identifying and accessing relevant sources of information, and synthesizing research into historical understanding through writing and discussion. Students seeking American Government & Economics (AGE) credit will practice these same skills of historical inquiry while developing skills for critical participation in democratic governance and other tools for accessing/confronting systems and structures of power.

This is a project-based course in which students will develop inquiry projects based upon their own particular questions and interests. We will also regularly engage in whole-class activities, including readings, discussions, films, guest speakers, and activities suggested and/or led by students.

This course will enroll a maximum of 27 students.

US 11A: Origins & Roots (ES)
Melissa Park, 1st Semester 2020-21
Melissa's virtual room 101 : Mon/Thu 10:30-11:45

SS - US History 11A / 0.5

This U.S. History 11A class, also counts as an ethnic studies credit (11B is offered as a separate class that meets on T/F).

The class is primarily for juniors & seniors (or those who’ve completed all/most of their world history credits)—but there can be exceptions to this—just talk with me. This will be a demanding class and requires students to already have some world history knowledge and skills, and be able to interact with/be challenged by different opinions/perspectives on mature topics. ALSO: through this class, interested seniors may complete their culminating social justice inquiry project, and juniors can get a head start!

We will start with an introduction to the histories of peoples of the Americas and West Africa. Indigeneity and settler-colonialism are concepts and lenses we’ll work with throughout the semester to develop critical readings of the past in order to help make sense of our present and future. We’ll uncover the roots of American capitalism, and the origins of policies that produced powerful ideas and dominant narratives of race, class, gender, and Americans of all backgrounds. We will engage in uncovering and examining critical narratives to complicate and decolonize our notions of justice, and (re-) center peoples’ humanity in the narratives perpetuated of what America is. Are we really a nation of immigrants? Or are we a nation of settlers? What is the difference? What are the consequences of answering either way?

Strong emphasis is placed on developing history skills, including researching primary and secondary resources, oral histories, and public memory, spotting and evaluating bias, and developing critical and supported arguments. All students are eligible to earn honors credit, which will involve reading/listening to and working with excerpts of Dr. Ibram X. Kendi’s Stamped From the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America, (and/or additional materials, TBD).

This semester, we’ll be completing 3-4 portfolios—tentatively. They may be focused on:
Portfolio 1: Indigeneity, the Americas, & Indigenous Peoples’ histories
Portfolio 2: Indigeneity, West Africa, & Settler-Colonialism
Portfolio 3: Slavery, Race, & Capitalism [American Revolution & the Constitution]
Portfolio 4: Abolitionism, Reconstruction, and “democracy”

IMPORTANT: This is not one of those classes that has no homework. This is an upper level class, meaning that I’ll frequently require you to read, write, reflect, watch documentaries, and work on projects outside of class. I try to space work out and be kind, but be aware that this class requires students to complete work outside of class. If you think/know you’ll need extra time and/or help to get work done, please let me know—I will absolutely work with you on this! I also strongly recommend that you show up for Humanities Competency Support at 3:00-3:50 on Tuesdays, and/or by appointment with me during “office hours.”

US 11B: Beginning Again (ES)
Melissa Park, 1st Semester 2020-21
Melissa's virtual room 101 : Tue/Fri 10:30-11:45

SS - US History 11B / 0.5

This U.S. History 11B class, also counts as an ethnic studies credit (11A is offered as a separate class that meets on M/Th).* A student can take this 11B class without having taken 11A previously (although it can help a lot to take 11A first or simultaneously). We’ll do a review of 11A topics at the start of this term’s 11B class.

The class is primarily for juniors & seniors (or those who’ve completed all/most of their world history credits)—but there can be exceptions to this—just talk with me. This will be a demanding class and requires students to already have some world history knowledge and skills, and be able to interact with/be challenged by different opinions/perspectives on mature topics. ALSO: through this class, interested seniors may complete their culminating social justice inquiry project, and juniors can get a head start!

Strong emphasis is placed on developing history skills, including researching primary and secondary resources, oral histories, and public memory, spotting and evaluating bias, and developing critical and supported arguments. All students are eligible to earn honors credit, which will involve reading/listening to and working with excerpts of Dr. Ibram X. Kendi’s Stamped From the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America, (and/or additional materials, TBD).

This semester, we’ll be completing 3-4 portfolios—tentatively, and TBD.

[more info re: 11b description to be posted here asap]

IMPORTANT: This is not one of those classes that has no homework. This is an upper level class, meaning that I’ll frequently require you to read, write, reflect, watch documentaries, and work on projects outside of class. I try to space work out and be kind, but be aware that this class requires students to complete work outside of class. If you think/know you’ll need extra time and/or help to get work done, please let me know—I will absolutely work with you on this! I also strongly recommend that you show up for Humanities Competency Support at 3:00-3:50 on Tuesdays, and/or by appointment with me during “office hours.”

US History, Are We There Yet?
Michelle Vecchio, 1st Semester 2020-21

None assigned

This space is for working on US History competencies in this current or previously taken semesters.

Students can work asynchronously and check in or spend the duration of the working period synchronously working from 1:25pm to 2:45pm on Wednesdays.