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Career & Technical Education CTE)

Band
Michelle Vecchio, 2nd Semester 2018-19

None assigned

Prerequisites: A willingness to play music with a group of people. Music talent or instruments are not required. Sign up early, the class is limited to 8 bands. No limit to the size of the band, though all members must participate in the final show (unless previously agreed on, with the coordinators approval)

Level: What you make it.

Description: This is a class in which you will create musical groups (of any nature) and be asked to come up with a 10-15 minute set to perform. Your band will also be required to play a cover song, randomly selected from a hat. We will also try to record some songs from each band. If you have always wanted to be in a band, or even if that urge is brand new, this is your chance.

You do not need to already know how to play an instrument, you only need a love of music and a willingness to participate. Please understand it is up to you to get into a band and stay in it, I will not be placing you in one.

Experimental Animation (Advanced)
Stefan Gruber, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Animation Labs : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:15-11:40

CTE - Animation Tech Graphics 2 / 0.5

Experimental Animation is a workshop designed to make the materials and resources available for the independent animator. 1st semester focuses on developing soundtracks before animation, so that lip-synch is possible. We will be able to have a professional style punched-paper animation area, one or two long-term 3-D animation setups; Flash will be available as well. Materials: Most supplies are supplied; some self-budget (probably under $20) may be needed. The finished works made in this class are burned to DVD and shown in a theatrical setting at the end of the 2nd semester.

Hardware Programming
Akil Srinivasan, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Moon 120 - The Laboratory : Tue/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

CTE - Digital Design 1 / 0.5

Interested in programming devices? Want to design and figure out electrical circuits? We’ll explore micro controller programming (using Arduino’s) and figure out how to program them, and connect them to other electronic parts. In the process, you will follow a series of tutorials, then expand on them to build your own personal devices!

The emphasis is on good engineering design. No prior programming experience required! Students who took Programming last year may continue in this class, building on skills and projects from last year. New students with no experience are encouraged to join us as well!

Credit: Competencies will be shown through project proposals, design, parts sourcing, prototyping and testing, reflections, and discussion.
Available for CTE, 3rd Year Math credit, or science seminar credit
Christina Wright will be assessing and signing off on CTE credit.

We will also follow the 8 absence attendance policy, which will help keep you on top of things in this class.

In addition to the programming and hardware content, students are expected to

  • Listen with respect to another person’s explanation
  • Engage in discussion
  • Communicate ideas both informally and formally
  • Provide help when asked
  • Ask for help when needed;
  • Play an active role in sustaining a safe and encouraging learning space for one another
  • Treat all materials gently so that they may be reused.

Nova Farm
Susan Barth, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Susan's Room #3 and the garden : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:20-13:45

CTE - Env Horticulture 1 / 0.5

In this class, you will experience botany, horticulture, construction, farming and social justice around food. You will work on the farm, cultivate crops, cook, create and carry out inquiry based experiments to support your learning, learn about environmental issues surrounding agriculture and do projects catered to your interests, including leadership, internships, and career paths. Be prepared to get dirty. This spring we will ready and plant raised beds with food crops, grow seed starts for the plant sale, work on landscaping, art and building. Come learn how to use power tools. Grow stuff, the bees need you.

This class can be taken for Occ. Ed. or Science, depending on what your focus is. You will need to work the details out with Susan.

A graduation Social Justice Project could be done in this class.

Open Animation Portal
Stefan Gruber, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Room 205 : Mon/Wed/Fri 14:35-16:00

CTE - Animation Tech Graphics 2 / 0.5

Open Portal is a way to extend your projects from other animation classes into a bigger project. For instance, if you have a 300 frame animation piece and want to color it, add shadows, and textures for a more professional feel, this is the place to do that. It also doubles as a place where you can be if you want extra time working on your assignments for Comics, Games, and Animation Class.

Committee

Group Coping (DBT and other coping skills)
Eyva Winet, 2nd Semester 2018-19
120 : Fri 13:50-14:30

UE - Personal Growth / 0.25

learn the skills to set boundaries while supporting peers and other loved-ones
practice them in life
share learning
build a community of students with stronger emotional intelligence

Peace of Mind
Akil Srinivasan, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Dance Room - B01 : Fri 13:50-14:30

UE - Student Activity / 0.15

We will practice weekly formal mindfulness meditation. No experience necessary! Many studies show that daily meditation can help us deal with a host of mental health issues such as anxiety and depression and help with stress reduction as well!

Poster Brigade/Building Art - THURS (Governing Committee)
Becky Laird, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Becky's Room - 201 : Thu 13:50-14:30

SS - Student Government / 0.15

Poster Brigade works in collaboration with the rest of the Nova community to create posters and flyers for Nova events and to help disseminate important information to the community. Poster Brigade is held as a quiet space.

Poster Brigade/Building Art - TUES (Governing Committee)
Becky Laird, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Becky's Room - 201 : Tue 13:50-14:30

SS - Student Government / 0.15

Poster Brigade works in collaboration with the rest of the Nova community to create posters and flyers for Nova events and to help disseminate important information to the community. Poster Brigade is held as a quiet space.

Sound Committee
Matthew Maley, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Band Room

SS - Student Government / 0.13

Video Game Social Committee
Julia Reade, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Room 208 : Fri 13:50-14:30

UE - Personal Growth / 0.25

This INVITE ONLY committee is a structured, student-lead committee designed to offer students an opportunity to further develop their social skills. The group will gather around a common interest—gaming—and engage in discussions about this topic.

Yearbook & Art Share Committee
Allison Sterrett, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Rm 3- Susan : Tue 13:50-14:30

UE - Leadership / 0.25

The Yearbook & Art Share Committee will meet both Tuesdays and Thursdays in Susan’s room (B03). We are looking for all types of folks to brainstorm, create, work with technology, organize etc. No experience necessary, just a strong willingness to contribute! This committee will be facilitated by Susan and Allison. Goals:

1. Yearbook: We are looking for motivated, organized, creative types (you do not need to have all of those traits together). We want photographers, designers, and computer types to help us. We want to capture the amazingness of our community. We also want the yearbook to be affordable for all who want it, so we will be figuring out new and creative ways to fundraise.

2. Art Shares: Historically, students have planned, facilitated, and performed in Art Share events one or more times per month with the goal of making space for creative expression and celebrating the talents of the Nova community. The Art Share team plans to expand their programming to reach more Nova students as well as to bring outside artists to our community.

The basic credit is .25 per semester, depending on the amount of work you put in.

Fine Arts

art survey: Jewelry Exploration
karen kosoglad, 2nd Semester 2018-19
219 : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

ART - Jewelry / 0.5

Learning Objectives

This is an advanced art class and a prerequisite of other art classes is required or student can show a portfolio of work. New students are encouraged to build a foundation in slow time and drawing into printmaking.

We will be developing processes to make all kinds of wearable art including enameling, soldering, metal etching, sawing metal, reclaimed/up cycling,small sculpture, fiber arts and more. This class will include research, inquiry, material acquisition, creative play. Wire and combining materials will be explored. We will use sketching nature and natural forms for inspiration.

This is an art survey class of both 2 and 3 dimensional design. Students will be invited to explore many art mediums and techniques. Printmaking ,drawing, painting, and sculpture will be offered. There will be a focus on the foundations of visual art and design.

A Sketchbook is required.

Learning Requirements

1.
The student understands and applies arts knowledge , and visual arts.
1.1.
Understands and applies arts concepts and vocabulary.
1.2.
Develops arts skills and techniques.
1.3.
Understands and applies arts genres and styles of various artists, cultures, and times.
2.1.
Applies a creative process to the arts.
2.2.

The student communicates through the arts.

Ceramics
karen kosoglad, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Art Room #31 : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:15-11:40

ART - Ceramics / 0.5

This class is for all levels. Students will be introduced to basic techniques of working with clay. Learning how to center the clay, hand building and sculpture will be explored. Many different glaze applications will be introduced. Students will learn about function and form through their exploration of clay and process.

Sketch book mixed media collage
karen kosoglad, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Art Room #31 : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

ART - Multimedia 1 / 0.5

Facilitate and introduce a variety Arts Medium with a focus on sketch books. students will collage and learn printmaking techniques and produce individual portfolios. Exploration of a diverse approach to printmaking through, mono prints, collographs, linoleum block, dry point, silk screen, reduction prints, 3 color blocks and image transfers. Through a combination of many printing techniques students can combine and alter their final images..

Small books mixed media collage and printmaking
karen kosoglad, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Art Room #31 : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

ART - Printmaking / 0.5

Facilitate and introduce a variety Arts Medium with a focus on sketch books. students will collage and learn printmaking techniques and produce individual portfolios. Exploration of a diverse approach to printmaking through, mono prints, collagraphs, linoleum block, dry point, silk screen, reduction prints, 3 color blocks and image transfers. Through a combination of many printing techniques students can combine and alter their final images.. there will be a structure brought into focus to build students foundations. drawing from life,nature, models and looking at the alphabet as a graphic design construct

Yes, and...
Julia Reade, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Vida Room 208

ART - Theatre 1/Acting / 0.5

Improv and art games. This class will be in two parts: weekly improve workshops with Action Faction (an improve school for nuero-divergent learners) and visual art workshops hosted by Vida. The joining theme will be participatory, process focused, student-centered curriculum.

Fine Arts / Science

INDEPENDENT CONTRACT
karen kosoglad, 2nd Semester 2018-19
219

None assigned

INDEPENDENT CONTRACT
ct -

Individual content goals, EALR’s and course/credit code(s) will be included in the enrollment section for each student contract.

Learning Requirements
Communication
1.
The student uses listening and observation skills and strategies to gain understanding. To meet this standard, the student:
1.1.
Uses listening and observation skills and strategies to focus attention and interpret information.
1.2.
Understands, analyzes, synthesizes, or evaluates information from a variety of sources.
2.
The student uses communication skills and strategies to interact/work effectively with others. To meet this standard, the student:
2.1.
Uses language to interact effectively and responsibly in a multicultural context.
2.2.
Uses interpersonal skills and strategies in a multicultural context to work collaboratively, solve problems, and perform tasks.
2.3.
Uses skills and strategies to communicate interculturally.
3.
The student uses communication skills and strategies to present ideas and one’s self in a variety of situations. To meet this standard, the student:
3.1.
Uses knowledge of topic/theme, audience, and purpose to plan presentations.
3.2.
Uses media and other resources to support presentations.
3.3.
Uses effective delivery. The student analyzes and evaluates the effectiveness of communication. To meet this standard, the student:
4.1.
Assesses effectiveness of one’s own and others’ communication.
4.2.
Sets goals for improvement.

Wednesday Resource
Michelle Vecchio, 2nd Semester 2018-19

None assigned

Health

Health
Julia Reade, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Julia Room 208 : Tue/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

HE - Health Education HS / 0.5

Together, we will investigate the following health topics, decentering white narratives and centering the stories and experiences of marginalized groups. Students will follow their individual inquiry more deeply into related subtopics to create a project that communicates their research.

1. Wellness
2. Safety
3. Sexual Health
4. Social Emotional Health
5. Substance Abuse and Misuse
6. Nutrition

Language Arts

Essay spring 19
Debbie Kuttner, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Debbie's Room 220 : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

LA / 0.5

This course is designed for anyone who wishes to write more powerful, interesting, and thoughtful essays of all types: expository, narrative, persuasive, compare/contrast, analytical, and more. Before writing we will engage in activities that will enhance and inform the writing process. We will read published essays and consider issues of qualities (ideas, organization, voice, word choice, sentence fluency, conventions, theses, transitions, and more). Each week we will practice some aspect of essay writing, consider the techniques of published writing, and share our own works in progress. Note: For credit you will write six polished essays and complete in-class writing and reading assignments, and perhaps seminar a published essay.
ATTENDANCE: Students are allowed to miss six classes (excused or unexcused) until they have to begin doing projects to make up for the lost hours not in class. If students don’t make up this time they are only eligible for a maximum of 0.25 credit until they do.

NovaKnows
Debbie Kuttner, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Debbie's Room 220 : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:20-13:45

LA - Journalism Writing / 0.5

There is an art to writing for yourself. Some call it narrative essay, some call it blogging, or journalling or sometimes it’s just about getting your ideas out there onto the interwebs and sharing your thoughts about music, movies, books, video games, politics, art, etc. In this class students will learn how to communicate ideas to an audience. There will be opportunities for writing reviews, interviews, research, and narratives. Some students will step up to be peer editors, some to work on the technical side (wordpress is our platform); some students will choose to write weekly columns, or to be investigative reporters. We will make decisions as a community of learners, perhaps tying ourselves directly with committees or other Nova/community entities (like facilitating a space for the PTSA, coor groups, Douglas Truth library, and more).

Check out novaknows.com and come and make it more of what it is, or something completely different.

Studio Ghibli
Debbie Kuttner, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Rm 220 - Debbie's : Tue/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

LA - 10B World LIT & COMP / 0.5

We will watch four or more films from Studio Ghibli, including but not limited to Princess Mononoke, Naussica of the Valley of the Wind, and Spirited Away. We will discuss, analyze, evaluate, and find joy in the films and then produce work reflective of our experiences intellectual and heartfelt. The four products from this class will include one project, one essay, and one creative writing. Each product will go through a drafting phase.

The Art of Writing
The Dark Knight Batman, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Room 102 : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

LA / 0.5

NO CELL PHONES IN THIS CLASS. IF YOU CAN’T DEAL WITH THAT DON’T TAKE THIS CLASS.

And the great God, Shub la Pulesh, pronounced the written word. AND IT WAS GOOD!
Then the great God, Shub la Pulesh, pronounced that the written word could be poetry, short story, essay, letters to friends, comments, grocery lists, etc. And the list grew and grew of what the written word could be. AND IT WAS GOOD!
Then the great God, Shub la Pulesh, pronounced that a teacher must be born to offer a room where this could happen. So, out of the mud and the grime of this wheat thresher of a world was brought a man. TERRANCE, HE SHALL BE CALLED!!!!! the great God, Shub la Pulesh, cried. AND IT WAS BETTER THAN GOOD!!!
The great God, Shub la Pulesh, proclaimed that sometimes one would read what one had written out loud. AND THAT WOULD BE VERY GOOD INDEED!
And then and verily and finally the great God, Shub la Pulesh, pronounced, LET US TAKE ALL OF THESE WRITINGS AND COMPILE THEM INTO A PORTFOLIO AND THEN WHEN THE END COMES WE SHALL CULL OUT THE GREATEST OF THE GREAT AND MAKE THEM INTO A BOOK! YES! EACH OF YOU WILL MAKE A BOOK!!!!! AND THOSE BOOKS….THEY SHALL BE GOOOOOOOOD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
And the Earth shook from the magnitude of the great god, Shub la Pulesh’s, statement, but settled back down again so that students could come to Room 41 on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday to write and read the great words.

The Naked Truth on Stereotypes
Melissa Park, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Melissa's room, Moon #101 : Mon/Wed/Fri 14:35-16:00

LA / 0.5

NO CELL PHONES ARE ALLOWED IN THE CLASS. HAVE YOUR CELL PHONE OUT IN CLASS AND YOU’LL BE MARKED ABSENT. And I am NOT cool with earbuds in people’s ears during class—seriously. ATTENDANCE: Rack up more than 6 absences (excused or unexcused), and your maximum credit drops to 0.25 until you make up for the competencies/lost hours not in class.

This is a Language Arts class for students who are the most frequently “invisibilized,” marginalized, and/or vulnerable to harmful stereotyping in mainstream society/culture, media, public policy and/or at school. All stereotypes objectify, judge, deny, and ultimately, exaggerate myths about who we are as individuals and communities, while limiting our abilities to express our whole truth and the fullness of who and what we want to be.

The Naked Truth On Stereotypes is a class about cultivating your voice and the power you already have inside you. Chelsey, LIO, Ahava, and Melissa will co-teach the class this semester. Our class goals are:

REFLECTION – deepen understanding of self & “other”
EXPLORATION – expose and debunk socially constructed myths of identity & stereotypes
CREATION – practice art to expand & amplify the collective creative power of community
CELEBRATION – celebrate our stories: all of them
ACTION – inspire & incite radical action to uproot systems of domination & dehumanization

Our work towards these goals include:
- critically reading and responding to poetry and prose on race, gender, class, sexuality, intersectional identities, and the role of the artist in society.
- connecting our individual experiences to systemic issues; questioning & analyzing history and current events through the lenses of power and privilege
- challenging ourselves and others to think deeply and critically on the above
- completing an individual inquiry project and related assignments on race, power, privilege, identity, justice, art, community
- active listening
- daily writing
- learning/using poetry tools in our writing
- role-plays and Theater of the Oppressed activities

No poetry writing experience is necessary. Students will perform their poetry in a culminating performance for an audience.

Language Arts / Social Studies

History of the Soviet Union
Lydia Condrea, 2nd Semester 2018-19
room 204 : Wed 13:50-14:30

None assigned

In this class we will explore the timeframe and some causes of historical events, starting from the Ist World War, 1917 revolution, formation of the Soviet Union, its attempts to expand its power and influence all around the world, Asia, Africa, Caribbeans, and Soviet block in Europe (the Warsaw pact). We looked into the Stalinist. We analyzed the collapse of the Soviet Union republic by republic looking at the particularities of each secession. All along we used literary material and songs to understand better the dynamics of the events.

Mathematics

Build
Akil Srinivasan, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Moon 120 - The Laboratory : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

MA - Applied Math 2A / 0.5

This is a class for people who love to use their hands, who learn best by doing, who like using tools with care. Are you curious about how to use geometry to design and build things? If so, this may be the class for you. We will be using power tools and electronic prototyping tools. The main focus will be on using geometry to drive the projects you’ll be making.

I have planned this class to be an extension of the formal Geometry you have learned, so you need to have taken Geo A and Geo B to be eligible, though you do not need to have earned full credit. This class can be a great way to make up any partial credits in Geometry A or Geometry B.

Infernal Casino
Michael Hodapp, 2nd Semester 2018-19
105 : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:20-13:45

MA - Probability & Statistics A / 0.5

Are you a game geek? When we play games, we’re constantly doing math. We observe patterns, create and test strategies, and try to increase our chances of winning, whether we’re playing with or against others. This class will use games and puzzles to explore inductive and deductive logic, probability, combinatorics, and basic game theory. We’ll spend a lot of time playing games as a way to learn about and apply mathematical thinking. Because some games take longer than others, I’ll also expect you to play games outside of class.

Work in this class will consist of 4-5 portfolios that encompass the following mathematical topics:
1. Inductive Logic, Deductive Logic, and Symbolic Logic Notation
2. Independent Probability
3. Dependent Probability
4. Expected value, payoff, and strategic decision making
5. Combinatorics and Probability using Combinatorics

In addition, students interested in working towards honors credit will demonstrate competencies such as binomial probability distribution, the probability mass function, and a written analysis of a the randomized elements of a strategic game.

In the process of completing these portfolios, students can expect to complete journal entries, game reports and reflections, written and online math assignments, and a final small group project in which students design an original game and analyze the logic, strategies, and psychology of it. We’ll teach these original games to the Nova community towards the end of the semester.

Science

Advanced Physics
Akil Srinivasan, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Moon 120 - The Laboratory : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:20-13:45

SC - Physics ADV 3 / 0.5

Physics Prerequisite: You must have taken and gotten full or close credit in both semesters of Physics A and Physics B (Physics 1 and 2 on your transcript). Physics Intensive for a semester works too.
Math Prerequisite: You must have taken 2.5 years of core math classes through Algebra 2A and gotten close to full credit. You should be concurrently enrolled in Algebra 2B or higher.
If you don’t meet the physics or math prerequisite, then you and your coordinator need to check in with Akil before enrolling.
Credit note: This is for Physics 3 credit.

In this class, there will be math, labs, research projects and physics seminars. If you hate these things this is not the class for you. If you like theories of the universe, questions of reality and perception, energy, movement, matter and MATH, then this is the class for you. We will be exploring fundamental classical theories in energy, circular motion, thermodynamics, and electromagnetism. You will be required to do a culminating lab research project and presentation during the last month of the semester

Intro to Life Science/Life is Funny
Susan Barth, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Room #B3 : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

SC - Life Science 1 / 0.5


This is an introductory Life Science class. If you already have experimental/lab skills and knowledge in topics like DNA, photosynthesis and genetics, then please take Biology.

This class is for people who like living things, but have not had a lot of experience with studying them. We will be doing experiments in biological topics, learning to ask scientific questions, create experiments, collect data and complete lab reports. We will use microscopes, balances and other lab equipment. We will study different parts of Biology, plants, animals, fungus, and their relationships in nature. Explore citizen science projects (Citizen science projects can earn service learning credit), research scientists and current events. Ever wonder what’s in pond water or how forests rely on fungus to survive? Let’s find out. This class will be great for those who are science shy or inexperienced. This is a great prerequisite for Biology, unless you can show that you have some solid experience in these areas to your coordinator.

Allison is involved for evaluation of curriculum for students who need modifications.

Marine Ecology
Susan Barth, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Room B3 : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

SC - Marine Science 1 / 0.5

This class will be co-taught with Owen Grossman. He is an avid diver in the Puget Sound.

We will focus on marine life and the environments they live in. We will be learning about specific organisms and how they work, gather food, evolve, survive harsh conditions, and the types of symbiotic relationships they form. There will be an anatomy and physiology portion in each ecosystem we learn about. We may dissect some organisms (not mandatory). We will use Inquiry to discover things about marine life and the ocean, create explorations and put our learning to use. We will explore how scientists create studies to investigate the marine environment.

Conservation will be a focus in this class, looking at what is happening in our oceans and figuring out what we can do about it. We will look at water and it’s life from a social justice stance, how are people and organisms affected by the greed of others? You will be expected to participate in conservation actions this semester (Service Learning hours will be available).

WE’RE GOING ON A BOAT!!!!! We will take our 3rd annual trip out into the Puget Sound. We will do excellent science stuff, touch critters and learn about our marine environment.

This class will be a .5 Marine Science credit. It is a good option for the EOC in conjunction with Biology to equal your full year.

Projects in Physical Science (Freshfolk Priority)
Akil Srinivasan, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Moon 120 - The Laboratory : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

SC - Physical Science 1 / 0.5

This class is Freshfolk Priority This is a class for students who might be “science shy” and want to learn basic skills in scientific inquiry, and have very little background in physical science. If you want to build, smash, fly, or mix things, this would be great class to build foundations and later take Chemistry and Physics! We’ll have some problem sets, lectures, discussions, and readings.

But mainly, projects, projects, projects. We will learn skills to propose, design, source, implement, and iterate physical science experiments. You will be required to keep a lab notebook to record your process, and Akil will give feedback that you’ll use to revise.

Capped at 25 spots to make sure everyone gets the coaching they need.

Social Studies

AGE
Melissa Park, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Melissa's room, Moon 101 : Tue/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

SS - American Government & Economics / 0.5

NO CELL PHONES ARE ALLOWED IN THE CLASS. HAVE YOUR CELL PHONE OUT IN CLASS AND YOU’LL BE MARKED ABSENT. And I am NOT cool with earbuds in people’s ears during class—seriously. ATTENDANCE: Rack up more than 6 absences (excused or unexcused), and your maximum credit drops to 0.25 until you make up for the competencies/lost hours not in class.

AGE (American Government & Economics) is a one-semester class for juniors and seniors, and is required of all students for graduation. In it, we work to build “toolkits” for understanding how we effect, and are affected by, public policies and systems in American society, both historically and currently.

We’ll examine the most pressing social issues affecting our communities, and work to understand, examine, and critique the structures of power in this country, with focus on what/who has power to change and/or perpetuate systemic harm. We’ll role-play, debate, make art, use music, math, and more to question, analyze, and build informed perspectives on history and current events affecting your life.

Students will learn how to write, research for, and complete a CBA (a short paper examining a public issue) that is a state requirement for graduation. ALSO: through this class, interested seniors may complete their culminating social justice inquiry project as part of the pilot grad requirement we are implementing this year.

EXPECT TO COMPLETE HOMEWORK OUTSIDE OF CLASS EVERY WEEK TO BE ON-TRACK FOR FULL CREDIT.

AGE American Government and Economics / U.S. History
Brian Aytch, 2nd Semester 2018-19
RM# 122 : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

IEP - American Government & Economics M / 0.5

Does capitalism or government propel the United States of American? The short answer is both but more importantly the answer is complex. And then there is the U.S. Constitution which supposedly sets a foundation for the American experiment. In this AGE course we will weave a tapestry to show each is somewhat depended on the other. The constitution will be our initial guide to understanding America, it will also serve as the foundation for the CBA (classroom based assessment) which is our culminating project in this course. The CBA is a major graduation requirement. The marriage of economics and government will be explored by studying the stock market, politics, current events and history. Students will also learn about vital macroeconomic concepts that drive the U.S. Economy.

Hip-Hop Studies
Melissa Park, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Melissa's room, Moon #101 : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:15-11:40

SS - World History 2 / 0.5

NO CELL PHONES ARE ALLOWED IN THE CLASS. HAVE YOUR CELL PHONE OUT IN CLASS AND YOU’LL BE MARKED ABSENT. And I am NOT cool with earbuds in people’s ears during class—seriously. ATTENDANCE: Rack up more than 6 absences (excused or unexcused), and your maximum credit drops to 0.25 until you make up for the competencies/lost hours not in class.

Hip-Hop Studies is a class open to anyone interested in learning more about the origins and evolution of how hip-hop has changed the world. Expect to participate…in cyphers of discussion, show & tell, making art, making space for all voices, deep listening, and building a creative community of learners and makers. There is zero room for passive observers in this class. Expect to regularly read/listen and respond in writing & discussion to a variety of lyrics, poetry, historical narratives, non-fiction writings, visual art, films, and music. EXPECT TO DO CLASSWORK ON YOUR OWN TIME, i.e. OUTSIDE OF CLASS, IN ORDER TO EARN CREDIT. This is a world history class that is also an Ethnic Studies course.

We will focus largely on the innovative and revolutionary aspects of hip-hop, looking at the movements and politics that inspired its birth as a form of art, music, and activism. Students will ask questions of how hip-hop speaks to youth, and speaks about oppression, violence, identity, culture, and power. We’ll explore hip-hop as a form of cultural politics and activism toward social justice. Students will create hip-hop inspired art, music, and activist projects. Tentatively, we will also welcome guest speakers in to teach workshops on beat-making, writing, graffiti art, dance, and community organizing.

Inventing America
Michael Hodapp, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Room 105 : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:15-11:40

SS - US History 11A / 0.5

In Inventing America, we’ll explore early U.S. history, from the arrival of Columbus through the Civil War. In studying this time period, we’ll constantly question everything about what it means to be American. We’ll critically examine the story about where our country came from by examining art, children’s books, movies, and political propaganda. We’ll compare the real history with some of the national myths that we’ve created. We’ll study topics that rarely make it into high school history texts, including colonialism in the Americas, an early history of gender and sexuality, the legacy of class struggles in the United States, and the creation of the concept of race. We’ll engage with complex history using role plays, class debates, research projects, and art.

This history class will not focus on memorizing names, dates, and places. Instead, this class will challenge students to think critically about U.S. history and to identify historical trends and tensions within U.S. society. By the end of the semester, students should be able to construct a cohesive narrative that connects current events to earlier U.S. history, including to our founding documents.

Queer History
Melissa Park, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Melissa's room / Rm 101 : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

SS - World History 2 / 0.5

NO CELL PHONES ARE ALLOWED IN THE CLASS. HAVE YOUR CELL PHONE OUT IN CLASS AND YOU’LL BE MARKED ABSENT. And I am NOT cool with earbuds in people’s ears during class—seriously. ATTENDANCE: Rack up more than 6 absences (excused or unexcused), and your maximum credit drops to 0.25 until you make up for the competencies/lost hours not in class.

Queer History is a world history class that seeks to learn more about how queer, gay, non-binary, transgender, and gender nonconforming people in different eras and cultures around the world have lived and shaped their societies since ancient times through present day. How and why was the the nature of heterosexuality constructed? How did the ancients think of human sexuality and same-sex relations? How old is “drag” in the scheme of human history—and why did people do it? What were the reasons cross-dressing was outlawed in writing in the Old Testament? Why was Joan of Arc’s “drag” so threatening to the power structures of her day? Why and how did the “gay capitals” we know today in different countries emerge? What are the origin stories of “gay rights” movements in countries around the world? How are the experiences of queer people of color similar and different to those of queer white folks, now and in the past?

Major class themes may include: identity, power & oppression, resistance & liberation, and reflection & action. EXPECT TO DO CLASSWORK ON YOUR OWN TIME, i.e. OUTSIDE OF CLASS, IN ORDER TO EARN CREDIT. (This description will be updated asap to include more detailed information.)

Whistleblowers and Muckrakers
Michael Hodapp, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Room 105 : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

SS - US History 11B / 0.5

This class will study United States History since the late 19th Century through the lens of whistleblowers, investigative journalists, and activists who exposed corrupt or unjust systems and fought to change them. During the course of the semester, we’ll cover industrialization, labor rights movements, the Civil Rights era, Vietnam, and current events such as the NSA and the Hanford Nuclear cleanup. We’ll approach history as a contested subject, one in which a multitude of stories from different perspectives must be weighed and considered as we search for larger trends and truths in U.S. society. Examining history through a lens of race, class, gender, and power, we’ll constantly ask whether the common stories we tell in U.S. history might be biased. If so, what purposes do they serve? And how can we wrap our heads around events and time periods that looked radically different to different people in the United States?

Rather than focusing on memorizing names, dates, and places, this class will challenge students to think critically about U.S. history and to identify historical trends and tensions within U.S. society. By the end of the semester, students should be able to construct a cohesive narrative that connects current events to earlier U.S. history.

World Languages

German Studies
Lydia Condrea, 2nd Semester 2018-19
RM #204 : Mon/Wed/Thu 14:35-16:00

WL - German 1 Comp NM (Novice Mid)*1.0 CR / 0.5; WL - German 2 Comp NH (Novice High)*1.0 CR / 0.5; WL - German 3 Comp IL (Interm Low)*1.0 CR / 0.5

All world language classes will start with a week of introduction to Language Acquisition, taught in English. The goal of this part of the course is to provide students with understanding of language acquisition/learning process and to empower them in their endeavor of mastering a new language by making them aware about most effective strategies to be used for reaching that purpose. Afterwards, participants will explore different aspects of German culture, learning linguistic pattern, and applying them in various situations. Teaching strategies, as in all language classes at Nova, are targeting language acquisition rather than learning.

EARNING CREDIT: FULL CREDIT upon the condition of 1) PERFECT ATTENDANCE 2) HOMEWORK COMPLETED. Homework is to be completed, there is no such thing as turning the homework in, getting a grade on it or such, homework is the material with which we are working in class, students are changing whatever needs to be changed, take notes, more experienced students are contributing more, beginners observe, follow, progress. Those who do not complete the homework on a regular basis will receive partial credit, absences as well result in lost of part of the credit.
When the student feels ready to demonstrate competencies for 2B level (does not even have to take the class), they are to:
1) Take a written test; 2) Go through an interview; 3) Prepare a project in German, and present it to the class.

Demonstrating 2B or higher competencies assures for that student levels 1A, 1B, 2A, and 2B or higher on their transcript.

Japanese Studies, intermediate
Lydia Condrea, 2nd Semester 2018-19
RM #204 : Tue/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

UE - Teacher Assistant (.25) / 0.5; WL - Japanese 1A / 0.5; WL - Japanese 2A / 0.5; WL - Japanese 3A / 0.5

All world language classes will start with a week of introduction to Language Acquisition, taught in English. The goal of this part of the course is to provide students with understanding of language acquisition/learning process and to empower them in their endeavor of mastering a new language by making them aware about most effective strategies to be used for reaching that purpose. Afterwards, participants will explore different aspects of Japanese culture, learning linguistic pattern, and applying them in various situations. This is an exploratory course, lead by students, advised and directed by Lydia. Learning strategies, as in all language classes at Nova, are targeting language acquisition rather than learning.

EARNING CREDIT: FULL CREDIT upon the condition of 1) PERFECT ATTENDANCE 2) HOMEWORK COMPLETED. Homework is to be completed, there is no such thing as turning the homework in, getting a grade on it or such, homework is the material with which we are working in class, students are changing whatever needs to be changed, take notes, more experienced students are contributing more, beginners observe, follow, progress. Those who do not complete the homework on a regular basis will receive partial credit, absences as well result in lost of part of the credit.
When the student feels ready to demonstrate competencies for 2B level (does not even have to take the class), they are to:
1) Take a written test; 2) Go through an interview; 3) Prepare a project in Japanese, and present it to the class.

Demonstrating 2B or higher competencies assures for that student levels 1A, 1B, 2A, and 2B or, respectively, higher on their transcript.