Course Catalog

Find

Found 91 courses.

Career & Technical Education CTE)

Career Choices and Get a Job
Jennifer Spigner, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Room 114 : Tue/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

CTE - Career Connections 1 / 0.5

Are you an 9th or 10th grader?
Do you wonder about the world of the work?
Are you concerned about how to find and keep a job?
Come to this class and you will become workplace ready to look for jobs and opportunities.
I can provide assistance in your job search and college/career options.

Career Research
Identify personal skills, interests and abilities and relate them to current career choices.
Present information to class on career interests
Professional/Soft Skills/Collaborate
Resume building
Interviewing Skills
Health and Safe in the workplace

Digital Music (Beats!)
Susan Watters, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

CTE - Recording Arts Tech 1 / 0.5

Generously sponsored by Foundry 10. Facilitator(s): Jake

Students in this course will learn how to make music with Ableton Live and Push, and gain foundations in the physics and science of sound and digital audio. Concepts in this course can be translated to video, storytelling, and many types of programming, all while having fun making beats and music. Each student will have access to a digital workstations to create original music. Additionally, students will learn to record, perform, sequence, and manipulate sound.

Experimental Animation (Advanced)
Stefan Gruber, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Animation Labs : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:15-11:40

CTE - Animation Tech Graphics 2 / 0.5

Experimental Animation is a workshop designed to make the materials and resources available for the independent animator. 1st semester focuses on developing soundtracks before animation, so that lip-synch is possible. We will be able to have a professional style punched-paper animation area, one or two long-term 3-D animation setups; Flash will be available as well. Materials: Most supplies are supplied; some self-budget (probably under $20) may be needed. The finished works made in this class are burned to DVD and shown in a theatrical setting at the end of the 2nd semester.

Fashion Design
Susan Watters, 2nd Semester 2019-20
221 : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

CTE - Apparel & Textiles I / 0.5

Generously sponsored by Foundry 10. Facilitator: Maria Bischof

All experience levels are welcome but be prepared to work in class, this is a “hands on” class.

We will read & create patterns, cut, serge, sew, iron.

Nova Farm
Susan Barth, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Susan's Room #3 and the garden : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

CTE - Env Horticulture 1 / 0.5

In this class, you will experience botany, horticulture, farming, and social justice around food. You will work on the farm, cultivate crops, cook, create and carry out inquiry based experiments to support your learning, learn about environmental issues surrounding agriculture and do projects catered to your interests, including leadership, internships, and career paths. Be prepared to get dirty. This fall, we work on putting some of the garden to bed, planting hardy winter crops and landscaping, art and building. Come learn how to use power tools and build stuff. Grow stuff, the bees need you.

There is a mandatory Service Learning portion to this class. There will be at least 1 field trip.

This class can be taken for Occ. Ed. or Science, depending on what your focus is. You will need to work the details out with Susan.

A graduation Social Justice Project could be done in this class.

Open Animation Portal
Stefan Gruber, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Room 205 : Mon/Wed/Fri 14:35-16:00

CTE - Animation Tech Graphics 2 / 0.5

Open Portal is a way to extend your projects from other animation classes into a bigger project. For instance, if you have a 300 frame animation piece and want to color it, add shadows, and textures for a more professional feel, this is the place to do that. It also doubles as a place where you can be if you want extra time working on your assignments for Comics, Games, and Animation Class.

Work Site Coordination 2019-20
Jennifer Spigner, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Room 111, Jennifer's Office

CTE - Hospitality Worksite / 0.5

Work-based learning activities extend the classroom into the workplace, connecting acquired knowledge and skills to a student’s future employment. Each student’s individual learning objectives, or goals will be articulated in the first meeting among the student, their suprevisor, and the WBL coordinator(me). They will be different for each student.

I will enter these goals after the first meeting.

Yearbook
Susan Barth, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Rm 3- Susan : Tue/Thu 13:50-14:30

CTE - Publishing Yearbook 1 / 0.25

Yearbook will meet both Tuesday’s and Thursday’s in Susan’s Room B03. We will fund raise with t-shirt sales, creating Nova promotional swag, photograph events and create our yearbook. We are looking for motivated, organized, creative types (you do not need to have all of those traits together). We want photographers, designers, and tech savvy folks to help us. We will capture the amazingness of our community. We also want the yearbook to be affordable for all who want it. So, we will be figuring out new and creative ways to fund raise. No experience necessary, just a strong willingness to contribute. You will learn all aspects of yearbook production regardless of your specialty. This class will be facilitated by Allison, Susan B.

The basic credit is .25 per semester, depending on the amount of work you put in.

Committee

Action Faction
Eyva Winet, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Moon 120 and Trans Resource Center : Thu 13:50-14:30

SS - Student Government / 0.13

Action Faction Mission Statement:
As an all-inclusive committee, we work to create a safe and respectful community for all genders and sexualities. We combat sexuality and gender identity oppression by creating positive actions in Nova and beyond. Positive actions include maintaining safe spaces for discussions, resources and events. We believe that any social justice movement must work towards inclusion of other social justice goals. We recognize that all oppressions are connected and in no way do we want our actions to propagate other forms of oppression.
Competencies

plan and execute social justice projects that support organizations efforts to end gender and sexuality injustice
learn about power and privilege
explore the interdependence of multiple oppressions
create and execute our own projects that will work toward gender and sexuality injustices
find levity and joy in this hard work
spread sass and camp to the world

Budget Committee
Lance Brown, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Lance's Room, B-19 : Thu 13:50-14:30

SS - Student Government / 0.15

This committee is responsible for the fiscal decisions of Nova. The Friends of Nova (formerly the PTSA) raises funds for student and teacher use. It’s the role of this committee to oversee the equitable distribution of these funds. Furthermore, Nova is the only school in the District that has the privilege of designating where and how our school budget is spent. This is the forum within which those conversations and decisions are made.

The learning goals of this committee are:
1. to learn how to read and interpret a fiscal spread sheet;
2. to participate in group decision making;
3. to engage in conversations about equity and opportunity within our community;
4. to provide a space where all students and school groups feel heard and valued and where their proposals are taken seriously;
5. to explore ways to communicate our decisions and dilemmas within the Nova community;
6. to observe and participate in a formal committee structure, including a mild form of Robert’s Rules of Order;
7. and to have the experience of facilitating the running of the committee.

Button Brigade - THURS (Governing Committee)
Becky Laird, 2nd Semester 2019-20
The Lab - 120 : Tue 13:50-14:30

SS - Student Government / 0.15

Button Brigade will work in collaboration with Action Faction and the rest of the Nova community to create buttons, posters, and flyers for Nova events and to help disseminate important information to the community.

Curriculum
The Dark Knight Batman, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Rm 102 : Thu 13:50-14:30

SS - Student Government / 0.25

This governing committee gives students the chance to create, critique, and put into practice at Nova curriculum. Students will get the chance to work with teachers to develop both whole classes, a lesson or lessons, or a unit or units. We are hoping to work hard to create curriculum in all disciplines that de-center white narratives, explore other critical narratives that have been sorely lacking in the education of American students since the inception of this country, and are anti-racist in nature.
Want to have a voice regarding what and how you are learning? Want to maybe even work to teach something in a class, or team teach with a teacher? This is the place you can do that.
This committee is also a great place to start (at any grade level) or fully develop (as a senior) your Senior Inquiry Social Justice Project.

Curriculum
Melissa Park, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Rm 102 : Thu 13:50-14:30

SS - Student Government / 0.25

This governing committee gives students the chance to create, critique, and put into practice at Nova curriculum. Students will get the chance to work with teachers to develop both whole classes, a lesson or lessons, or a unit or units. We are hoping to work hard to create curriculum in all disciplines that de-center white narratives, explore other critical narratives that have been sorely lacking in the education of American students since the inception of this country, and are anti-racist in nature.
Want to have a voice regarding what and how you are learning? Want to maybe even work to teach something in a class, or team teach with a teacher? This is the place you can do that.
This committee is also a great place to start (at any grade level) or fully develop (as a senior) your Senior Inquiry Social Justice Project.

Debate Committe
Lance Brown, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Lance's Room B19 : Wed 13:50-14:30

UE - Leadership / 0.25

OUR MISSION:
Debate Committee connects, supports, and inspires a diverse community
committed to empowering students through competitive speech and debate

Dungeons and Dragons
The Dark Knight Batman, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Rm 102 and 121 : Wed 13:50-14:30

UE - Student Activity / 0.25

This committee is devoted to playing the incredible role playing game – Dungeons and Dragons. Each Wednesday we will come together and play. Create a character! Run a campaign! No experience necessary at all. We will teach you how to play. Must be willing to get along with others (or be willing to learn how to), show up unless you have an incredibly good excuse, and certainly have the capacity to have fun.
Also, if you don’t have dice or source books, don’t worry about it. We have some extra you can borrow for the day.

Guild
Lydia Wynn, 2nd Semester 2019-20
207 - Winnie's Room : Tue/Thu 13:50-14:30

SS - Student Government / 0.25

The purpose of guild is to promote events that strengthen the community involvement of Nova.
Students in guild will:
*Plan various events
*Support fundraisers
*Organize prom

  • Engage in the needs/desires of other Nova students.
    *Represent all student activities and interests.

Hiring and Review
Adam Croft, 2nd Semester 2019-20
room 202 : Thu 13:50-14:30

SS - Student Government / 0.15

Terrance will be co-facilitating this committee!

This committee will collect feedback about teachers and coordinators at Nova and share that feedback with teachers and coordinators. We will also participating in hiring new positions and collecting information from the school about FTE needs when hiring needs to take place.

Korean Language & Culture Committee
Melissa Park, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Melissa's Room / Moon 101 : Fri 13:50-14:30

UE - Student Activity / 0.15

By students’ request, this activity committee meets again this semester. Open to anyone interested in learning more about Korean language and/or culture. Expect to participate in activities centered in mini history and culture lessons, food, and games.

Sure, you may have heard of BTS or BB cream or even Bibimbap and Bulgogi, but what are you curious to learn about Korean culture, history, or language? We’ll talk about this as a committee and create a plan for what we want to do.

Here’s a brainstorm of possible questions to explore (but we certainly don’t have to go into any of these if there’s no interest in them.)
What’s up with Korean dramas—why are they so popular around the world?
Why so much eating and crying (at the same time) in Korean tv?
Why did “mukbangs” (먹방) become (and continue to be) so popular?
Why is tteokbokki (떡복기) so delicious—and can we make some during committee time?
What kinds of (offline) group games do Koreans play? (Let’s try some out!)
What’s it like to be LGBTQ in Korea?
What’s it like to be a feminist in Korea?
What are specifically Korean cultural feelings/concepts, like “Han” (한) and “Jeong” (정) about?
Why is there so much cuteness in pop culture (known as “aegyo” 애교)—that is not only embodied by young female-identified people?
Anyone interested in learning to read/write/speak/understand the Korean language? (The written alphabet is easier to learn than you might think—can be learned in less than a day.)
Are you curious about Korean children’s stories? Folk stories?
Korean etiquette? Everyday phrases/common greetings?
Hilarious Korean slang?
Manhwa/web comics?
Proverbs?
The music and/or film/tv industries in Korea?
Can we watch some cool Korean movies?
Why is there so much English in mainstream Korean culture?
What cool literature and/or other arts come out of Korea?
Why is Korea still split in two? Will it ever be unified?
What is the education system in (South) Korea like?
What are the Koreas’ relationships with their neighboring countries?
Why does the bad juju between Japan and Korea never seem to die?
What the heck is up with Kim Jong-Un & DJT?
How worried should the US be about North Korea’s weapons? What do South Koreans think of them?
Why is the former South Korean president (the one before the current person in office) sitting in jail for the next 25 years?

Come on down! We’ll figure it out together, and it will be 꿀잼 (fun) and 대박 (awesome)!!

Mothership - Tuesday and Thursday
Michelle Vecchio, 2nd Semester 2019-20
105 : Tue/Thu 13:50-14:30

SS - Student Government / 0.25

Attend all sessions of Mothership, with no more than 6 absences

Serve as a timekeeper, notetaker and facilitator at least once session

Engage in participation and discussion

Represent issues discussed in Mothership within the coor and return with materials and ideas

Planet Nova, Friday edition
Adam Croft, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Room 202 and beyond : Fri 13:50-14:30

UE - Leadership / 0.15

Let’s tend to our school’s relation to the Earth and each other, including through maintaining and strengthening our systems for composting, energy conservation, environmental justice, ecological awareness, and anything else we can do for our living community.

Planet Nova, Tuesday edition
Adam Croft, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Room 202 and beyond : Tue 13:50-14:30

SS - Student Government / 0.15

Let’s tend to our school’s relation to the Earth and each other, including through maintaining and strengthening our systems for composting, energy conservation, environmental justice, ecological awareness, and anything else we can do for our living community.

POC Committee
Melissa Park, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Tuesdays & Wednesdays: Melissa's room, Moon 101 : Tue/Wed 13:50-14:30

SS - Student Government / 0.15

This governing committee, the People of Color Committee (POCC), is a meeting place for students and staff who identify as people of color.

On Tuesdays we are especially focused on citizenship teaching and learning (e.g. POCC is one of several governing committees which give input to our administrators for Nova’s Mission/Vision C-SIP School Improvement Plan (an official document generated annually by Nova’s administrators that sets goals, enrichment, instructions programs, students’ achievement, and assessment of the school, and is published on our school’s SPS website).

We organize coat & warm clothing drives in the winter, field trips, pot-lucks, host movie nights, collaborate with local organizations, and program teaching events for the school. Additionally, students rotate facilitation duties of weekly committee meetings & short- and long-term projects.

On Wednesdays we meet to build community and hold space for POC students and staff to reconnect with each other, develop and grow our leadership skills, and discuss issues of race and equity in a safe and open environment. At times, we also use Weds to continue the work begun at our Tuesday meetings.

Students who attend and participate on both Tues (governing day) & Wed (activity day) will of course have more opportunities to meet more competencies (to earn more credit) than those who attend once a week. Students may also opt to work on projects outside of committee time to meet governing committee competencies/earn more credit. See Melissa for details.

Poster Brigade - TUES (Governing Committee)
Becky Laird, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Becky's Room - 201 : Tue 13:50-14:30

SS - Student Government / 0.15

Poster Brigade works in collaboration with the rest of the Nova community to create posters and flyers for Nova events and to help disseminate important information to the community. Poster Brigade is held as a quiet space.

Recruitment Committee
Debbie Kuttner, 2nd Semester 2019-20
B 20 Tuesday Rm 220 Thursday : Tue/Thu 13:50-14:30

UE - Leadership / 0.25

Recruitment Committee oversees the functioning of all recruitment-related activities here at Nova. In particular, this committee can make decisions that effect how Nova is going about bringing new students into our community as well as how we are perceived by those potential new recruits.

We need students in order to be a school! And we need people to know about Nova and want to come here in order to get those students! Basically, Recruitment is essential to the survival of Nova and all that we are doing here.

Decisions are made through consensus-building whenever possible.

Room of Requirements, knit, crochet, embroidery, or something entirely different
Debbie Kuttner, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Room 220 : Fri 13:50-14:30

UE - Student Activity / 0.25

If you know how to knit or crochet: create; and if you don’t, learn how to knit or crochet (occ ed credit offered if you document your work and learning). If you come to the room and want to do, learn, or teach another craft, we can explore that. If you want to use the space for something else, well come find out if we can meet your requirements!

Safety
Eyva Winet, 2nd Semester 2019-20
122 Brian's Room : Tue 13:50-14:30

SS - Student Government / 0.13

By popular demand and necessity for keeping our behinds covered, a new committee has been created to address issues of physical and emotional safety at Nova! It was given the following powers by United Nova: writing the district safety plan, improving our disaster preparedness, being in charge of drills, reviewing and evaluating emergencies and improving our process of addressing emergencies, managing shared public spaces at Nova, including outdoor spaces, helping resolve issues that make students, staff and/or the community feel unsafe, creating and updating Nova Norms and Policies, supporting restorative processes when Nova Norms are broken and physical or emotional safety is compromised.

Second Life for Misfit Toys, Wednesday Edition
Adam Croft, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Room 202 and beyond : Fri 13:50-14:30

UE - Student Activity / 0.15

Students will will use various sewing and crafting skills to bring a second life to misfit toys.

This committee also meets in Lydia W.’s room, Friday afternoons.

Senior Committee
Mark Perry, 1st Semester 2019-20
Room 121

None assigned

Seniors will work collaboratively to:

1) support each other’s progress toward graduation.
2) create and facilitate the June 2020 graduation ceremony
3) develop and implement ideas on how to best mentor and support new Nova students
4) create a senior project as part of “giving back” to Nova

Sound Committee
Matthew Maley, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Band Room : Tue 13:50-14:30

SS - Student Government / 0.13

Video Game Social Committee
Julia Reade, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Room 208 : Fri 13:50-14:30

UE - Personal Growth / 0.25

This INVITE ONLY committee is a structured, student-lead committee designed to offer students an opportunity to further develop their social skills. The group will gather around a common interest—gaming—and engage in discussions about this topic while engaged in collaborative gaming.

WAD and Committe for Change ( sub committees of Safety)
Eyva Winet, 2nd Semester 2019-20
104 : Tue 13:50-14:30

SS - Student Government / 0.13

Students and representatives from WAPI and Navos are holding space for students to work on issues that have come up repeatedly in Safety Committee related to drug, alcohol, tobacco etc. This includes support for sobriety, education about substances, creating solutions and education related to issues that come up related to our school norm, “Be Sober”.

Students can attend on (WAD) Tues or (Committee for Change) Thurs or both.

Wellness
Julia Reade, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Room 208

None assigned

Elective

Chess and Variants
Stefan Gruber, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Animation Lab : Wed 11:40-12:20

UE - Student Activity / 0.15

Your objective will be to improve your chess playing abilities, and learn some variations on the chess rules.

Music Theory
Matthew Maley, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Band Room : Tue/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

ART - Music Theory / 0.5

Prerequisites: A willingness to learn music theory and use them to write music. Musical talent is not required. Sign up early, the class is limited to 15 students!

Level: What you make it.

Description: This is a class in which you will learn the fundamentals of music and use them to write your own music. If you have always wanted to write music, or even if that urge is brand new, this is your chance. You do not need to already know how to play an instrument or write lyrics, you only need a love of music and a willingness to participate. Units will include: Introduction to Rhythm, Reading music, Scales and chords, Writing lyrics, melodies and harmonies, and Genre and composition

Fine Arts

Art - Pottery (M/W 10:15)
Becky Laird, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Art Room (219) : Mon/Wed 10:15-11:40

ART - Ceramics / 0.5

Art Multimedia - Bookbinding/Collage (M/W 8:45)
Becky Laird, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Art Room 219 : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

ART - Multimedia 1 / 0.5

We will spend the first week or so making a journal in which students will spend the remainder of the semester working on collages to fill up the book. Each week will have a theme (individual or co-created).

Week of:
2/24 – Finish book binding and begin collage projects. Identify personal/group themes. Book binding process reflection (Reflection #1)

3/2 – Theme 1
Work on collages

3/9 – Theme 2
Work on collages
Share first two themes
Reflection #2

3/16 – Theme 3
Work on collages

3/23 – Theme 4
Work on collages
Share next 2 themes
Reflection #3

3/30 – Theme 5
Work on collages

4/6 – Theme 6
Work on collages
Share next 2 themes
Reflection #4

4/20 – Theme 7
Work on collages

4/27 – Theme 8
Work on collages
Share next 2 themes
Reflection #5

5/4 – Theme 9
Work on collages

5/11 – Theme 10
Work on collages
Share next 2 themes
Reflection #6

5/18 – Theme 11
Work on collages

5/25 (no school Monday) – Theme 12
Work on collages
Share next 2 themes
Reflection #7

6/1 – Theme 13
Work on collages

6/8 – Theme 14:
Work on collages
Share next 2 themes
Reflection #8

6/15 (last week of school)
Work on collages
Final Reflection

Band
Matthew Maley, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Tue/Thu 12:20-13:45

ART - Instrumental Misc / 0.5

Prerequisites: A willingness to play music with a group of people. Music talent or instruments are not required. Sign up early, the class is limited to 8 bands. No limit to the size of the band, though all members must participate in the final show (unless previously agreed on, with the coordinators approval)

Level: What you make it.

Description: This is a class in which you will create musical groups (of any nature) and be asked to come up with a 10-15 minute set to perform. Your band will also be required to play a cover song, randomly selected from a hat. We will also try to record some songs from each band. If you have always wanted to be in a band, or even if that urge is brand new, this is your chance.

You do not need to already know how to play an instrument, you only need a love of music and a willingness to participate. Please understand it is up to you to get into a band and stay in it, I will not be placing you in one.

Becky's ART Independents - Spring 2020
Becky Laird, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Art Room (219) : Mon/Wed 12:20-13:45

None assigned

Independent contracts have specific competencies related to each contract. Students will meet with staff overseeing the contract and with content area specialists to ensure appropriateness of competencies. Independent contracts are an opportunity for students to seek out knowledge and skills independently with the collaborative support and guidance of school staff.

Fine Arts / Science

Read, Write, Communicate
Debbie Kuttner, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Room 220 Debbie's Room : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

LA - 12B Comparative Lit & Comp / 0.5

On Tuesdays we will read. On Thursdays we will write. Every other Friday we will communicate with one another about what we are doing and make plans for the next week. Did you like to read in your past, but don’t make time for it now—come to this class. Have you always wondered what it would be like to try and write a novel—come to this class. But you can be a non-reader, a non-writer, or you can be a lover of biographies, history, science and read that! And you can be a writer of essays, poetry, screenplays, and yes, you can write any or all of those. We will co-create the semester to make it work for everyone who shows up. Regular attendance will be imperative to earning credit!

.h4 Heading 4 Competencies
#A. Engagement with community—on Fridays, we will not only talk about what we have been reading and writing, but also engage in the creation of a writers community, a book club—whatever works for us.
#B. Self-assessment/growth. you can set your own goals at the beginning of the semester, Debbie will help you along the way. This class might be very structured to meet your needs, or maybe you’ll thrive in a lack of structure.
#C. Technical/Communication Skills. We will use google docs and slack for the writing and reflecting parts.
#D. Gathering of materials/resources. We will decide as a class how to share the readings and writings.

I cannot wait!

Well, and...
Julia Reade, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Room 208

None assigned

Well, and… is Yes, and… re-imagined. On Wednesdays and every other Friday, Mae Ott will lead improv activities aimed at supporting student growth in communication and social skills as well as holding space where students feel safe stepping outside of their comfort zones. Mondays will be geared towards self-care, wellness, and healthy relationships with ourselves and others. We will examine our personal self-care routines with the goal of highlighting what is going well and growing in other areas. We will examine relationships and practice what it means to heave healthy relationships with ourselves and others that center consent. Through Well, and… you will demonstrate Health and Language Arts learning objectives towards our school competencies.

Learning Objectives:

Health and Wellness:
1. Students will analyze the influence of family, peers, culture, media, technology, and other factors on health behavior
2. Students will demonstrate the ability to access valid information and products to enhance health
3. Students will demonstrate the ability to use interpersonal communication skills to enhance health and reduce health risks
4. Student will demonstrate the ability to use decision-making skills to enhance health
5. Students will demonstrate the ability to use goal-setting skills to enhance health
6. Students will demonstrate the ability to practice health-enhancing behaviors to avoid or reduce health risks
7. Students will demonstrate the ability to advocate for personal, family, and community healthy

Speaking and Listening:
1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse parterns building on other’s ideas and expressing their own
2. Adapt speech to a variety of different contexts and task

Health

Gender Tea
Eyva Winet, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Sanctuary B20 : Wed 13:50-14:30; Fri 13:50-14:30

UE - Personal Growth / 0.25

Gender Tea
Is the gender binary getting you down? How about the gender hierarchy? Tired of other people telling you what your identity is or should be or that your doing it wrong? Want to drink tea and chat with other rad people who want to talk about gender, sex and sexuality in a safe and supportive space? Want to imagine space where all bodies are safe, free and celebrated? Want to work toward creating that here and now? Everyone is welcome and encouraged to come as long as you can agree to the safety norms grown in the group.

Talk to Eyva about Health or other kinds of credit.

Language Arts

Essay spring 20
Debbie Kuttner, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Debbie's Room 220 : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:20-13:45

LA / 0.5

This course is designed for anyone who wishes to write more powerful, interesting, and thoughtful essays of all types: expository, narrative, persuasive, compare/contrast, analytical, and more. Before writing we will engage in activities that will enhance and inform the writing process. We will read published essays and consider issues of qualities (ideas, organization, voice, word choice, sentence fluency, conventions, theses, transitions, and more). Each week we will practice some aspect of essay writing, consider the techniques of published writing, and share our own works in progress. Note: For credit you will write six polished essays and complete in-class writing and reading assignments, and perhaps seminar a published essay.
ATTENDANCE: Students are allowed to miss six classes (excused or unexcused) until they have to begin doing projects to make up for the lost hours not in class. If students don’t make up this time they are only eligible for a maximum of 0.25 credit until they do.

J.A.M. journalism and marketing
Debbie Kuttner, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Room 220 Debbie's Room : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:15-11:40

LA - 10B World LIT & COMP H / 0.5

JAM stands for journalism and marketing. You can think of it like a combo of blog class and recruitment committee, but don’t stop thinking there. Nova needs a dynamic online presence. We need to broadcast the beauty of our learning community out onto the interwebs. During this semester you can be a student attending both this class and recruitment, or just this class. All you need bring is one of the following: love of Nova, joy in the world, passion for making change, or… (you fill in the blank).

Students will be expected to reach competency in five areas—how you reach those competencies will be determined by you, me, and the class.
.h4 Heading Competencies
#A. Content – Social Construction of Nova’s website. The website looks a certain way right now. Does it express who we are. Is it accessible to all the stakeholders?
#B. Processes – Personal Construction of Nova’se website. Perhaps you end up with a column, or an ongoing podcast. Or perhaps you just write one article, but at some point in the semester your person should get represented.
#C. Communication/Community. This is going to be a tough semester. We want to grow Nova’s numbers—how do we use our website to do that?
#D. Growth – Creativity, Discomfort, Risk Zone. This competency shouldn’t be hard to reach at all. I’m already in my discomfort zone of how to make this really successful. You have to work with others in the class, and members of the Nova community, and even beyond Nova.
#E. Accountability – Social Justice. I will ask that every student take a racial lens to something at least once in the semester—this could look like visiting with POC committee and asking for feedback on the website, but it could look like so many other projects and critiques as well.

Know
The Dark Knight Batman, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Room 102 : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:20-13:45

LA - 12B-H Comparative Lit & Comp / 0.5

THIS CLASS IS FOR JUNIORS AND SENIORS ONLY.

NO CELL PHONES IN THIS CLASS. IF YOU CAN’T DEAL WITH THAT DON’T TAKE THIS CLASS.

You are the experience.

Expect to work toward understanding your life.
Expect to speak a great deal in this class.
Expect to move.
Expect to read.
Expect to be there.
Expect to write.

Me Vs. You
Chelsey Richardson, 1st Semester 2019-20
Melissa's Room - Moon 101 : Mon/Wed/Fri 14:35-16:00

LA / 0.5

“Me Verses You”, will be an exploration of R&B music, poetry, and literature from the 80’s, and 90’s. We will examine the ways in which these artistic mediums depict and perpetuate ideas about gender, race and class. Students will take what they’ve learned and engage in research from the perspective of their generation’s artistic expression of R&B music, poetry, and literature. We will think critically about what we read and listen to and investigate the ways in which language and guide society. Students will engage in learning in a variety of ways. We will read, write, watch music videos, and movies.

This class is taught by Chelsey!

Some Films
The Dark Knight Batman, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Room 102 : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

LA - 12B-H Comparative Lit & Comp / 0.5

This class will help you earn your ethnic studies credit.
CONTENT AND PHONE WARNINGS: THIS CLASS WILL DISCUSS ISSUES OF RACE, POWER, PRIVILEGE, GENDER, EQUALITY, DEATH, LIFE, FREEDOM, CONTROL, BEAUTY, AND REALITY. DO NOT TAKE THE CLASS IF ANY OF THESE ISSUES WILL BE TOO DIFFICULT FOR YOU TO MANAGE.
NO CELL PHONES WILL BE ALLOWED IN CLASS. YOU WILL BE COUNTED ABSENT IF YOU PULL YOURS OUT WITHOUT PERMISSION. IF YOU CAN’T DEAL WITH THIS THEN DO NOT TAKE THE CLASS.
We will study different types of story arcs and archetypes through viewing and discussion different films and documentaries. Each film will have a project that will be due for it, and will be created within the context of the film and discussion in class. Some of the films we MIGHT watch are:
“Get Out”
“Boyz in the Hood”
“Black Klansman”
“Children of Men”
“Yojimbo”
“I Am Not Your Negro”
“Moonlight”
“The Big Sick”
“Smoke Signals”
“Reel Indian”
“Do the Right Thing”
“Set it Off”
“Get on the Bus”
“No Country for Old Men”
“When We Were Kings”

and many others. If you are interested in films and/or stories this would be a good class to take.

Studio Ghibli
Debbie Kuttner, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Rm 220 - Debbie's : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

LA - 10B World LIT & COMP / 0.5

We will watch four or more films from Studio Ghibli, including but not limited to Princess Mononoke, Naussica of the Valley of the Wind, and Spirited Away. We will discuss, analyze, evaluate, and find joy in the films and then produce work reflective of our experiences intellectual and heartfelt. The four products from this class will include one project, one essay, and one creative writing. Each product will go through a drafting phase. There will also be an emphasis on note taking in traditional and non-traditional ways. Students will thus have the opportunity to develop their own strengths as self aware note-takers.

The Art of Fiction
Debbie Kuttner, 1st Semester 2019-20
Rm 220 - Debbie's Room : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

LA - 11B Amer LIT & COMP / 0.5

Let’s read books! Wait, what is a book in the 21st century? Let’s look at a variety of genres (science fiction, fantasy, sci fi, dystopias, horror, alternate history, historical fiction, and more). And while we are at it, let’s make our own multimedia books—using found materials. Let’s build something we can all be proud of.
Students will be expected to read, sometimes with ears, sometimes with eyes, and sometimes with both. Students will be expected to write, sometimes with mouth, and sometimes with fingers—using a variety of implements.

The Art of Writing
The Dark Knight Batman, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Room 102 : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

LA - 11B Amer LIT & COMP H / 0.5

NO CELL PHONES IN THIS CLASS. IF YOU CAN’T DEAL WITH THAT DON’T TAKE THIS CLASS.

And the great God, Shub la Pulesh, pronounced the written word. AND IT WAS GOOD!
Then the great God, Shub la Pulesh, pronounced that the written word could be poetry, short story, essay, letters to friends, comments, grocery lists, etc. And the list grew and grew of what the written word could be. AND IT WAS GOOD!
Then the great God, Shub la Pulesh, pronounced that a teacher must be born to offer a room where this could happen. So, out of the mud and the grime of this wheat thresher of a world was brought a man. TERRANCE, HE SHALL BE CALLED!!!!! the great God, Shub la Pulesh, cried. AND IT WAS BETTER THAN GOOD!!!
The great God, Shub la Pulesh, proclaimed that sometimes one would read what one had written out loud. AND THAT WOULD BE VERY GOOD INDEED!
And then and verily and finally the great God, Shub la Pulesh, pronounced, LET US TAKE ALL OF THESE WRITINGS AND COMPILE THEM INTO A PORTFOLIO AND THEN WHEN THE END COMES WE SHALL CULL OUT THE GREATEST OF THE GREAT AND MAKE THEM INTO A BOOK! YES! EACH OF YOU WILL MAKE A BOOK!!!!! AND THOSE BOOKS….THEY SHALL BE GOOOOOOOOD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
And the Earth shook from the magnitude of the great god, Shub la Pulesh’s, statement, but settled back down again so that students could come to Room 41 on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday to write and read the great words.

Up, Up, and Away
The Dark Knight Batman, 2nd Semester 2019-20
102 : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

LA - 11B Amer LIT & COMP / 0

In this class you will turn yourself into a superhero and tell your story through various mediums. We will explore the many aspects of the hero archetype and incorporate what we find into our stories. We will also watch a few movies to help us with this exploration. We will also role play some. Comic books, graphic novels, your imagination, and the desire to become the hero(ine) you have always known you were are important aspects to wanting to be in this class. My great hope is that we will produce an anthology of our stories and art to sell for the charity of our choice.


Note – You may not make yourself into a villain, or eventually turn into a villain. You will make up villains (or use some of the ones that are with us now) but it will be up to you to vanquish their evil desires.****

World Building
Debbie Kuttner, 1st Semester 2019-20
Rm 220 - Debbie's Room : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

LA - 11B Amer LIT & COMP / 0.5

Let’s create worlds. On Mondays students will engage in their own world building project that will last the whole semester. They will be guided via on-line feedback and one-on-one teacher meetings where teacher and student will build and assesss their competencies together. On Wednesdays, the whole class will engage in building one world together, which will involve colloboration for creation as well as creations that then will be collaboarted upon. Students will be expected to read, sometimes with ears, sometimes with eyes, and sometimes with both. Students will be expected to write, sometimes with mouth, and sometimes with fingers, and sometimes via small group of whole class. Students will be expected to read at least one book for the semester, more if they are seeking honors credit and/or above LA10b credit.

Language Arts / Fine Arts

Play Production
Melissa Park, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Rm 104 : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:20-13:45

ART - Theatre 1/Acting / 0.5; LA / 0.5

Nova Drama Theatre Festival!

Calling all actors, artists, designers, musicians, techies, magicians, dancers, directors and anyone else interested in theatre! We are putting on a 1-act Theatre Festival in the spring, with opportunities to work on multiple short plays!

Nova alum and local actor/director Beverly Poole will be directing, and guiding the class in putting on the 1-act festival. Come make theatre magic, and tell some amazing stories!

Language Arts / Social Studies

Critical Eye on Psych 101
Eyva Winet, 2nd Semester 2019-20
B20 Sanctuary : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

None assigned

Critical Eye on Psych 101: Decentering the dominant narrative on health and wellbeing

This is a class that combines psycho-education regarding typical high school psychology topics, such as Memory, Personality, and Biological Bases of Behavior, with practices of decolonizing and uncovering dominant and underlying societal narratives of psychology and wellbeing.

We will discuss material having to do with narrative therapy practices of externalizing problems/troubles and dominant cultural narratives, with the intent of uncovering narratives of resistance and wellbeing. We will also discuss material having to do with decolonizing psychology. And we will discuss material developed from the American Psychology Association for high school psychology.

Students will be required to sign a consent form regarding expectations for the class, since I have a dual relationship with NOVA students, being not only a teacher here, but also a parent of a student that attends NOVA, and I am a counselor, but will not be individually counseling people of the class.

Get It Done--History/LA
Melissa Park, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Melissa's Room - Moon 101 : Mon/Wed/Fri 14:35-16:00

UE - Focus / 0.5

Get It Done—History/LA is a class whose purpose is in its name.

Come to complete your work for ANY class—it doesn’t have to be work from my classes—in a low-key, quiet atmosphere with laptops and at least one or more teachers here to help you FINISH YOUR WORK. This is a good place for getting help in breaking down assignments into smaller, manageable steps, and learning to manage your study time productively. I’m here to provide help with reading, interpreting and analyzing texts, doing research, giving feedback on work in progress, brainstorming ideas, project planning, etc. and to provide templates/examples/suggestions of how to structure and finish your writing- or project-based assignments. Get help here with logging into and using Schoology, developing and supporting an argument or thesis, or writing a bibliography. Work on building habits of sustaining focus on the task/s in front of you, pushing through anxiety/inertia/perfectionism about your process, and holding yourself accountable for getting the work done—and turned in! (Then rinse and repeat.)

This is a good place for students in US History, other history/humanities classes, and/or seniors working on inquiry projects to get guidance and help, if you wish, or use it as simply a regular time/space to work in. This is also a space/time for students with independent contracts to do their required minimum weekly check-in with me. Snacks may be provided. Only students who are doing schoolwork or meeting with me are allowed in this space. There is no hanging out in this space; it is not a place to constantly be on your phone—unless you’re actively using it to complete an assignment.

Mathematics

Algebra 1B (TuThu 12:20)
Akil Srinivasan, 2nd Semester 2019-20
120 - Science Lab : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

MA - Algebra 1B / 0.5

This is the second half of Algebra I, and will begin halfway through the Algebra curriculum. This is a playful and rigorous exploration of linear, quadratic, and exponential equations, graphs, and tables. We do a lot of talking, experimenting, and modeling with “stuff.” We will continue our exploration of slope, or rate of change. We will learn how to tell if, when, and where two lines cross, and how this technique can help in a decision making process about various problems. We will learn how to graph parabolas and how to predict from their equations what they’re going to look like. We will explore exponents and see how exponential equations model the growth of bacteria, populations, and, of course, money! We will focus intently on squares and square roots and learn how to simplify radicals, expanding to identifying and using the Pythagorean theorem and the distance formula (continued in geometry)

Algebra 1B MON 10:15am
Lance Brown, 2nd Semester 2019-20
B19 Lance's Room : Mon/Wed 10:15-11:40

MA - Algebra 1B / 0.5

This is the first semester of Algebra I. This course is appropriate for any students who are interested in taking it, regardless of whether they feel confident in math or not. In addition to learning the fundamentals of algebra, we’ll be devoting weekly class time to developing number sense, mathematical inquiry skills, and pattern recognition. Additional support time is available outside of class for students who would like additional help or more advanced challenges.

This class will cover 5 areas:
1. Numbers and Properties
2. Variables and Equations
3. Intro to Functions
4. Linear Functions
5. Linear Functions, Part II

In addition to the mathematics content, students are expected to

  • listen with respect to another person’s explanation;
  • provide help when asked;
  • ask for help when needed;
  • play an active role in sustaining a safe and encouraging learning space for one another; and
  • treat all materials gently so that they may be reused.

Algebra 2B
Akil Srinivasan, 2nd Semester 2019-20
120 - Science Lab : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:20-13:45

MA - Algebra 2B / 0.5

This is the second of two semesters of Algebra 2. This course is appropriate for any students who are interested in taking it, and have taken Algebra 2A; it is the 3rd course in the math sequence at Nova. In addition to reviewing the fundamentals of algebra, we’ll be learning about a host of new functions. The main focus will be how to use functions in real-life situations!

Our class will spend time on mathematical inquiry skills, mechanical skills, and how to apply these ideas to real life problems in engineering, science, and student-driven areas of interest.

There will be about 2 hours of homework/studying per week. Be prepared to practice your math skills and collaborate on projects. We will also follow the 6 absence attendance policy, which will help keep you on top of things in this class.

This class will cover the following areas:

  • Finish Quadratic Functions
  • Exponential & Logarithmic Functions
  • Polynomials
  • Rational exponents & Radical functions
  • Rational Functions

In addition to the mathematics content, students are expected to

  • Listen with respect to another person’s explanation
  • Engage in discussion
  • Communicate ideas both informally and formally
  • Provide help when asked
  • Ask for help when needed;
  • Play an active role in sustaining a safe and encouraging learning space for one another
  • Treat all materials gently so that they may be reused.

Competency Recovery
Lydia Wynn, 2nd Semester 2019-20
207 - Winnie's Room : Mon/Wed 8:45-10:10

MA - Algebra 1A / 0.5; MA - Algebra 1B / 0.5; MA - Algebra 2A / 0.5; MA - Algebra 2B / 0.5; MA - Geometry A / 0.5; MA - Geometry B / 0.5

The objective of Competency Recovery is to satisfy the requirements of missed competencies in prior math classes. This course will be driven by individual student needs. Each student will complete their own portfolio based on the competencies that they need to complete or strengthen to be on track for graduation.

While building content competencies, students will also develop their skills of:
Perseverance
Communication/Relationship
Modeling
Building Connections

Financial Algebra B Tue/Thur 12:20
Lance Brown, 2nd Semester 2019-20
221 Lance's Room : Tue/Thu 12:20-13:45

MA - Financial Algebra 2 / 0.5

In this class we will alternate between the personal and the general. We will learn the everyday skills adults need to establish a budget, bank, save and borrow money, and pay local and national taxes. At the same time, we will be exploring the finances of the country. Just as we look at our own budgets, we will explore the topic of balancing the federal budget and learn about the issues that surround the federal deficit. As we explore the distinction between “wants” and “needs” in our own budgets, we will examine the choices our own country makes in its military spending. As we explore the way taxes are taken out of paychecks (FICA) we will look at the structure and sustainability of Social Security and Medicare. We will explore income tax models comparing fixed-amount taxation to flat/proportional taxes, to the progressive tax model.

This is a math course for students who learn best by doing. It has been designed for those who “think with their hands” and who like to use math in real situations from the get go. We will do many labs and short term projects in this course. In addition to the math, we will be working throughout on problem solving skills, communication skills, and the ability to work on a team, the three attributes employers say are the most important to them.

G-I'm-A-TREE (GEOMETRY) B Mon/Wed 12:20-1:45
Lance Brown, 2nd Semester 2019-20
221 Lance's Room : Mon/Wed 12:20-13:45

MA - Geometry B / 0.5

Geometry B Tues/Thur 8:45-10:10am
Lance Brown, 2nd Semester 2019-20
221 Lance's Room : Tue/Thu 8:45-10:10

MA - Geometry B / 0.5

Pre Calculus B
Lydia Wynn, 2nd Semester 2019-20
207 - Winnie's Room : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

MA - Pre-Calculus A / 0.5; MA - Pre-Calculus A H / 0.5

Pre Calculus Learning Objectives

A chance to take mathematics to a whole new level. Using prior mathematics learning (Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2) as a foundation, we are going to explore how math can apply to your world with an introductory Calculus lens. From working with functions as a descriptor of relationships and change, to developing connections between triangles, circles, and functions (trigonometry). We will open our minds to the language that is used to describe the patterns of the world and strengthen your comfort towards working with mathematical notation, graphical representation, and manipulation.

Experience in Algebra 1, Geometry, and Algebra 2 is highly encouraged as they represent the foundation of what we do in Pre Calculus. Complete mastery is not necessary, however genuine effort and honest question asking are welcomed! Please come to class with an open mind about where mathematics can take you in the world.

Statistics/Quantitative Reasoning B
Lydia Wynn, 2nd Semester 2019-20
207 - Winnie's Room : Mon/Wed 10:15-11:40

MA - Probability & Statistics B / 0.5

Hello future statisticians!
The goal of this course is to help students build the necessary tools to help them understand the world from an analytical perspective. By building confidence with quantitative reasoning and communication of data, students will explore topics that help people make decision about the status of the world and anything it is. From mean, median, and mode to distribution models, to regression analysis strategies, students will leave this class with a base level understanding of qualitative and quantitative statistical analyses.

Topology
Adam Croft, 2nd Semester 2019-20
room 202 : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

None assigned

This course is taught by Mae, with support from Adam.

Learning Objectives
What’s the difference between open and closed sets? Is every shape just a bunch of circles? How do you add loops and multiply spaces? Can you always cut a ham sandwich in half? Topology is an interesting and elegant new field of mathematics that answers age old questions and gives radical new results. Topology is abstract, kind of like geometry without any distances or angles. In this class, you’ll be learning how to prove your theorems, and think about math in new and abstract ways. Rigorous, fun and student-taught, this is a math class like none you’ve ever taken. Students should take this course if they’re interested in math and want a new type of fast paced math class that challenges them to think rigorously as well as creatively. A prerequisite in geometry is recommended but not required.

Physical Education

3-Way Soccer
Stefan Gruber, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Animation Lab, The Dead Rat Field : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

PE - Individual/Dual Activity 1 / 0.5

3-Way soccer!
This is an unorthodox sports workshop. We sit down at the end of each game to talk about what rules we want to add and subtract to a constantly changing sport. 12 years of fine tuning in this way has produced a game that uses 3 teams on a circular field and a huge yoga ball that you dribble on the grass with your fist, or kick. It feels a bit like a bizarre circus act crossed with a blend of many familiar sports aspects. Meet at Stefan’s room to keep your bag safe, then we head over to the Dead Rat Field.

Bombardment Society
The Dark Knight Batman, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Garfield Community Center : Fri 13:50-14:30

PE - Individual/Dual Activity 1 / 0.25

This class can be Individual/Dual Activity 1.

Students will develop eye hand coordination and learn teamwork through the age old game of dodge ball.

Map My Fun
Julia Reade, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Room 208 and Outside

None assigned

IMPORTANT Map My Fun will utilize a fitness tracking app, Strava, and our own two feet. No phone? No problem! No feet? Also no problem. However, we will be outside mapping our fun rain or shine.

Did you know you can draw using the satellites in space? True story! We’ll use maps, technology, and our own two feet to create images. Walk a heart around King’s Deli, spell “Nova” on the Garfield grass field, or jog a dead rat as a tribute to your school. By mapping your phone, you will demonstrate physical fitness learning objectives towards our school competencies.

Learning Objectives:
1. Demonstration of motor skills and movement patterns
2. Application of concepts, principles, strategies, and tactics related to movement patterns and performance
3. Recognition of the value of physical activity for health, enjoyment, challenge, self-expression, and social interaction
4. Exhibition of responsible personal and social behavior that respects self and others
5. Demonstration of the knowledge and skills to achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of physical activity

Science

Biology
Susan Barth, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Susan's RM 3 : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

SC - Biology A / 0.5

Come explore Biology. This class will include, inquiry based science, research, modeling of systems and creating projects. You will hone your experimental skills, creating experiments to further your learning and expand your mind. This class will highlight Cell Biology topics. There will be terminology to learn and apply. As a Biologist, you will share your work with your peers and beyond.

There will be a minimum of 2 hours of homework/studying per week. Be prepared to practice your study skills or build them if that is new to you. You will be expected to learn and apply study techniques.

This class will be offered for Biological Science credit. It’s expected that you have some science background. If you need a boost before this class, take Life, Labs and Learning.

Attendance: This class will follow the 6 absence attendance policy, although you should plan to attend class regularly, which will help keep you on top of things in this class. After 6 absences, you will need to complete a project outside of class to have the possibility to earn full credit.

Expectations _ You will be expected to show up and contribute to this class.

Botany
Adam Croft, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Room 202 and beyond : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:20-13:45

SC - Biology B / 0.5

Students will explore the world of plants. Students will explore local plants; practice different forms of observation, experimentation, and research; and put their learning to use in applied botanical studies.

Conservation
Susan Barth, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Susan's RM 3 : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:15-11:40

SC - Ecology 1 / 0.5

Come and save the world. Explore ecosystems and how they interact. Learn about the human impact on the planet and our effect on organisms. What will your role be? How will you work to save the planet? In this class you will create positive change and lead others to do the same. We will be creating Eco justice/Social Justice projects in this class. We will explore ways that people are giving back and join them. You will engineer a project that will help save the world and get started on it. From Greta Thunberg to Boyan Slat, teenagers can save the world. Come be a part of the change.

Life on Earth
Adam Croft, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Room 202 and beyond : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

SC - Biology B / 0.5

Students will explore the science and history of life on Earth. Students will be expected to develop a broad understanding of the dynamics of life on Earth while also taking on an inquiry and teaching project exploring a particular aspect of Earth’s life. This course will also prepare students for half of the Biology EOC competencies.

Scope and sequence:

I. What is life? How do we answer such a question? [research, classify, design]
a. Zones of exploration
i. Definition of life;
ii. Requirements for life;
iii. Classification of life.
b. Project: Design a viable creature.

II. How do organisms live together? How do we study these interactions? [research, observe, design, experiment]
a. Zones of exploration
i. Ecological relations;
ii. Human-induced changes.
b. Project: Design and conduct a field study.

III. How do organisms change over time? How do we know? [research, scheme]
a. Zones of exploration
i. Evolution by natural selection;
ii. Examples of evolution;
iii. Human evolution.
b. Project: Plausible evolution of creature.

IV. Biology EOC: practice and review

V. Final portfolio:
a. Guiding questions:
i. What have you accomplished?
ii. What have you learned?
iii. What are you still pondering?
iv. What are you still struggling over?
v. What will you take with you from this experience?
b. Portfolio:
i. Collected works from the semester
ii. Written reflection on above questions

Local Environmental Justice
Adam Croft, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Room 202 and beyond : Tue/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

SC - Science Seminar / 0.5

How have people lived in this place?
How is our society currently existing in this place?
How could we live in this place?

This course will investigate the history and science of our relations to each other and to the land/waters/air of this place we call Seattle, Salish territory, the Pacific Northwest, the Puget Sound Basin, … home. Students will develop and practice a critical lens toward histories of indigeneity, settler-colonialism, immigration, resource extraction and use, local ecosystems, environmental justice movements, and our personal and community-based relations with this place. Expect to research, explore, question, discuss, act, and create in this project-based inquiry into Local Environmental Justice.

Marine Ecology
Susan Barth, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Room B3 : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:20-13:45

SC - Marine Science 1 / 0.5

We will focus on marine life and the environments they live in. We will be learning about specific organisms and how they work, gather food, evolve, survive harsh conditions, and the types of symbiotic relationships they form. There will be an anatomy and physiology portion in each ecosystem we learn about. We may dissect some organisms (not mandatory). We will use Inquiry to discover things about marine life and the ocean, create explorations and put our learning to use. We will explore how scientists create studies to investigate the marine environment.

Conservation will be a focus in this class, looking at what is happening in our oceans and figuring out what we can do about it. We will look at water and it’s life from a social justice stance, how are people and organisms affected by the greed of others? You will be expected to participate in conservation actions this semester (Service Learning hours will be available).

This class will be a .5 Marine Science credit.

Physics Intensive
Akil Srinivasan, 2nd Semester 2019-20
120 - Science Lab : Mon/Tue/Wed/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

SC - Physics A / 0.5; SC - Physics B / 0.5

This is a combined Physics 1 and Physics 2 intensive that meets everyday.
You must be able to commit to coming every day

There will be math, labs, research projects and philosophical seminars. If you hate these things this is not the class for you. If you like theories of the universe, time travel, questions of reality and perception, energy, movement, matter and MATH, then this is the class for you.

If you have not finished at least 2 years of high school equivalent math – Algebra 1 and Geometry – then you and your coordinator need to check in with Akil before enrolling. You should be taking Algebra 2 or higher math at the same time If you are super excited about physics you can still take this class without the math pre-req but you may be asked to commit to out of class tutoring or studying on your own.

Social Studies

AGE on Earth
Adam Croft, 2nd Semester 2019-20
room 202 and beyond : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

SS - American Government & Economics / 0.5

We’ll work together to learn how best to explore and confront US systems of governance and economics. How do we participate in government policy making and enforcement? What are methods of social change people and movements have used outside of government institutions? How can our governance and economy responsibly relate to (and even heal) the living Earth systems upon which we all depend?

Be prepared to question, research, take action, reflect, and educate, both within and outside of the Nova community.

Students will learn how to write, research for, and complete a Constitutional Issues Competency-Based Assessment (the “CBA”, a short paper examining a Constitutional issue) that is a state requirement for graduation. ALSO: through this class, interested seniors may complete their culminating social justice inquiry project, and juniors can get a head start!

Frida
Melissa Park, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Melissa's room, Moon #101 : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

WHist / 0.5

This is a world history and ethnic studies credit class.

FRIDA is a class that examines Mexican history through the art, life, times, and ‘phenomenon’ of painter Frida Kahlo (1907-1954). Known in her native Mexico as “la heroína del dolor,” (“the heroine of pain”) Frida and her work have been celebrated as emblematic of national and indigenous tradition. Best known for her self-portraits, Frida famously said, “I paint myself because I am so often alone, because I am the subject I know best,” and, “I don’t paint dreams or nightmares, I paint my own reality.” Married to another famous artist, Frida was openly bisexual and became famous in her own right for the intensity and vibrance of her work on canvas, her many love affairs, her passion for living big while living with and through constant physical and emotional pain, her iconic unibrow and mustache, and the beautiful traditional Tehuana clothing she often wore.

We’ll ask questions of history to forge new understandings of some of Frida’s main influences: Mesoamerican/indigenous Mexican cultures and epistemologies/ways of knowing (e.g. the Aztec Nahui Ollin/4 movements), Spanish colonization of Mexico/Central America, political revolutionaries of Frida’s time, and Mexican art/murals/painters. We will critically examine narratives of the Mexican Revolution to understand vital examples of how power works, how it flows, and who has/can have power in a society stamped with persistent inequalities. This may shed more light on our look at selected current events in Mexico and its relations with the US and Latin America.

We’ll engage in arts and history processes to more closely examine our own influences and ourselves, which may include creating a series of self-portraits. Students are expected to complete 4 portfolios focused on past & present eras of Mexican history that include assignments based on short readings w/analysis and discussion, participation in class activities, role-plays, panel presentations, written reflections, visual art “assignments”, group-tests, and a short research paper.

“I used to think I was the strangest person in the world but then I thought there are so many people in the world, there must be someone just like me who feels bizarre and flawed in the same ways I do. I would imagine her, and imagine that she must be out there thinking of me too. Well, I hope that if you are out there and read this and know that, yes, it’s true I’m here, and I’m just as strange as you.” –Frida Kahlo.

NO CELL PHONES ARE ALLOWED IN THE CLASS. SERIOUSLY. DO NOT SIGN UP FOR THIS CLASS IF YOU CAN’T HANDLE THIS.

ATTENDANCE: Students are allowed to miss six classes (excused or unexcused) until they have to begin doing projects to make up for the lost hours not in class. If students don’t make up this time they are only eligible for a maximum of 0.25 credit until they do.

Human Geography (WH/Ethnic Studies)
Melissa Park, 1st Semester 2019-20
Melissa's room / Rm 101 : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

SS - Ethnic Studies / 0.5

THIS IS AN ETHNIC STUDIES CLASS AND WILL FULFILL THE GRADUATION REQUIREMENT FOR IT.

Human Geography is a shiny new world history & ethnic studies class that aims to take a decolonized approach to studying the how’s and why’s of movements (migrations) of peoples on the planet in past eras through today. How did those movements shape history and ideas of home (what is home?), nation, who gets to belong, who doesn’t belong, and how is the latter group treated as a result of the rules of who gets to belong? How have power and oppression shaped people’s identities, and your own? How have constant human stories of resistance and striving for liberation shaped people’s identities, and your own? How have people held onto cultural traditions, knowledge of family, ancestors, sense of self, if/when they must—or choose to—or are forced to—pick up and leave? What gets lost in the leaving? What is gained? What does it mean to be “from” a place? What does it mean if your people don’t have a physical homeland?

This history class will not focus on memorizing names, dates, and places. Instead, it will challenge students to think deeply about historic trends and tensions within human society. We’ll approach history as a contested subject, one in which a multitude of stories from different perspectives must be weighed and considered as we search for the truth of the origins for why things are the way they are in 2019. We’ll ask what sorts of power do groups of people have, and what ways does power flow? In studying various time periods, we’ll constantly question everything about what it means to be a human who belongs, and critical & dominant narratives about who is seen as a human (and treated accordingly). By the end of the semester, students should be able to construct cohesive narratives that connect current events to past stories.

We will also have lots of fun with maps! Maps act as backdrops for statements about politically imposed boundaries, territoriality, and other notions of power and projection. They can also act as metaphors for seeking location and experiencing dislocation, charting new terrain, exploring ratios to scale, and bringing order to chaos.

  • We will study maps (e.g. how have world borders changed through war, colonialism, and immigration, etc.? Perhaps we’ll shake our heads at outdated ways of grouping people, and take real stock of our version of this/how we are doing it today, and what will future humans think of how we view/treat our world’s land, resources, and inhabitants?).
  • We will make maps (e.g. we’ll try some experimental mapping of things/experiences/ways of being in our own lives today; perhaps we’ll develop a local participatory mapping project to collaborate on with others outside of the class?).
  • We will complete map-based projects as ways of working through some of the above questions (e.g. we’ll explore psychogeography which explores systems and relationships rather than imagery; explore mapping psychological terrain rather than geographical features. In this way maps may be really interesting tools for us to examine critical and dominant narratives.)

PLEASE REMEMBER, NO CELL PHONES ARE ALLOWED IN THE CLASS. SERIOUSLY. DO NOT SIGN UP FOR THIS CLASS IF YOU CAN’T HANDLE THIS. (You will be marked absent if your phone is out during class.)

ATTENDANCE: For 0.5 credit, students can miss up to six classes (excused or unexcused) until they need to complete projects to make up for missed community competencies. Students will have multiple options to demonstrate they’ve met these missed competencies.

Korean Studies
Melissa Park, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Melissa's room, Moon #101 : Tue/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

WHist / 0.5

This is a world history and ethnic studies credit class.

In this class, students will ask questions of major events, issues, ideas & influences that shaped Korea from ancient to modern eras. Some of these include developing familiarity with the proto-Korean 3 Kingdoms period, and how foreign invasions and battles for control of the land & its peoples over centuries has impacted Korean identity, and ideas of nationhood, patriotism, and democracy. Additionally, we’ll study topics students in last semester’s Korean Language & Culture Committee suggested: e.g., ancient Korean philosophy, indigenous Korean religion/shamanism, Korea-Japan relations in the past and present, being LGBTQ in [South] Korea, and feminism in [South] Korea—a deeply patriarchal society.

Understanding Korea today means understanding the roots of its division into North & South during the Cold War, South Korea’s rise as an economic power, its “soft power” in Hallyu 한류 (the “Korean wave” of food, electronics, music, tv/film, cosmetics, fashion), the Korean diaspora (e.g. around 84.5% of overseas Koreans live in just five countries: China, the United States, Japan, Canada, and Uzbekistan), the complexity of North Korea’s international relationships and its closed & repressive society, the complexity of South Korea’s international relations with Japan, the U.S., and the world, and how these multi-national agreements and policies impact regular peoples’ daily lives (e.g. the ever-widening wealth gap in South Korea).

NO CELL PHONES ARE ALLOWED IN THE CLASS. SERIOUSLY. DO NOT SIGN UP FOR THIS CLASS IF YOU CAN’T HANDLE THIS.

ATTENDANCE: Students are allowed to miss six classes (excused or unexcused) until they have to begin doing projects to make up for the lost hours not in class. If students don’t make up this time they are only eligible for a maximum of 0.25 credit until they do.

US 11A: Indigeneity & Settler-Colonialism
Melissa Park, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Melissa's Room / Moon 101 : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:15-11:40

SS - US History 11A / 0.5

This is the Spring 2020 U.S. History 11A class, and also counts as an ethnic studies credit (11B is offered as a separate class that meets on T/Th/F).

The class is primarily for juniors & seniors (or those who’ve completed all/most of their world history credits)—but there can be exceptions to this—just talk with me. This will be a demanding class and requires students to already have some world history knowledge and skills, and be able to interact with/be challenged by different opinions/perspectives on mature topics. ALSO: through this class, interested seniors may complete their culminating social justice inquiry project, and juniors can get a head start!

We will start with an introduction to the histories of peoples of the Americas and West Africa. Indigeneity and settler-colonialism are concepts and lenses we’ll work with throughout the semester to develop critical readings of the past in order to help make sense of our present and future. We’ll prioritize uncovering the roots of American capitalism, and the origins of policies that produced powerful ideas and dominant narratives of race, class, gender, and Americans of all backgrounds. We will engage in uncovering and examining critical narratives to complicate and decolonize our notions of justice, center peoples’ humanity, and act to disrupt the status quo / complicity of an uninformed public and perpetuation of dominant narratives about what America is—are we really a nation of immigrants?—or a nation of settlers? What is the difference, and what are the consequences of answering either way? Students will also engage in learning more about their own indigeneity and cultural & historical roots.

Strong emphasis is placed on developing history skills, including researching primary and secondary resources, oral histories, and public memory, spotting and evaluating bias, and developing critical and supported arguments. All students are eligible to earn honors credit, which will involve reading/listening to and working with Ibram X. Kendi’s Stamped From the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America, (and/or additional materials, TBD).

This semester, we’ll be completing 4 portfolios. Tentatively, here’s what you can expect:
1. Portfolio 1: Indigeneity, the Americas, & Native American Representation through the lens of pre-1492-1620
2. Portfolio 2: Indigeneity, West Africa, & Settler-Colonialism, through the lens of pre-1492-1620
3. Portfolio 3: Slavery, Race, & Capitalism [American Revolution & the Constitution], through the lens of 1600-1770; 1770-1800
4. Portfolio 4: Abolitionism, Reconstruction, and “democracy” through the lens of 1840-1877

IMPORTANT: This is not one of those classes that has no homework. This is an upper level class, meaning that I’ll frequently require you to read, write, reflect, watch documentaries, and work on group projects outside of class. I try to space work out and be kind, but if you blow off the work, you’ll get behind and overwhelmed. You will not receive US History credit without completing the work outside of class. If you think/know you’ll need extra time and/or help to get work done, it’s STRONGLY RECOMMENDED you show up for the Get it Done-History/LA class at 2:35 on M/W/F!

PLEASE REMEMBER, NO CELL PHONES ARE ALLOWED IN THE CLASS. SERIOUSLY. DO NOT SIGN UP FOR THIS CLASS IF YOU CAN’T HANDLE THIS. (You will be marked absent if your phone is out during class.)

ATTENDANCE: For 0.5 credit, students can miss up to six classes (excused or unexcused) until they need to complete projects to make up for missed community (& communication) competencies. Students will have multiple options to demonstrate they’ve met these missed competencies.

US 11B: Mass Incarceration
Melissa Park, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Melissa's Room / Moon 101 : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

SS - US History 11B / 0.5

This is the Spring 2020 U.S. History 11B class, and also counts as an ethnic studies credit (11A is offered as a separate class that meets on M/W/F). A student can take this 11B class without having taken 11A previously (although it can help a lot to take 11A first or simultaneously). We’ll do a review of 11A topics at the start of this term’s 11B class.

The class is primarily for juniors & seniors (or those who’ve completed all/most of their world history credits)—but there can be exceptions to this—just talk with me. This will be a demanding class and requires students to already have some world history knowledge and skills, and be able to interact with/be challenged by different opinions/perspectives on mature topics. ALSO: through this class, interested seniors may complete their culminating social justice inquiry project, and juniors can get a head start!

This class grows out of an ongoing collaboration with the Black Prisoners Caucus (BPC) at Monroe Correctional Complex to teach [K-12] students about incarceration, as one of their initiatives to support system-impacted schoolchildren, and their families and communities. It is an introduction to & overview of today’s system of mass incarceration and emphasizes the origins of policies and ideas that shape/d its evolution, its impacts on individuals and communities, and seeks to complicate the ways we look at justice.

Students will examine, challenge, and interrogate dominant narratives about mass incarceration and the accompanying silences, invisibility, misinformation, stigmas, and myriad challenges people directly affected by it live with. In short, this class seeks to problematize mass incarceration and what sustains it, in order to launch solutions-oriented inquiries and actions into the world. It will be heavily immersed in uncovering and examining critical narratives to complicate and decolonize our notions of justice, center peoples’ humanity, and act to disrupt the status quo / complicity of an uninformed public and perpetuation of dominant narratives about prison and punishment. Ways we do this include students learning about their own indigeneity and cultural & historical roots, and engaging in healing, restorative approaches to historical traumas.

Draft description in progress
Learning targets, competencies, assessments, class activities and content are designed to engage students in learning around 4 major Ethnic Studies themes: Identity, Power & Oppression, Resistance & Liberation, Reflection & Action.

By the end of this class, students will be able to:
1. Identify the roots/origins of mass incarceration

2. Identify what policies, practices maintain and/or contribute to it [e.g. the failures of the public school system/school-to-prison pipeline]

3. Identify the overall impacts/effects of mass incarceration on families, communities, and society as a whole; problematize the prison system

4. Critically analyze and defend a position on potential solutions to a specific area of impact on affected people, families, communities, and/or society

IMPORTANT: This is not one of those classes that has no homework. This is an upper level class, meaning that I’ll frequently require you to read, write, reflect, watch documentaries, and work on group projects outside of class. I try to space work out and be kind, but if you blow off the work, you’ll get behind and overwhelmed. You will not receive US History credit without completing the work outside of class. If you think/know you’ll need extra time and/or help to get work done, it’s STRONGLY RECOMMENDED you show up for the Get it Done-History/LA class at 2:35 on M/W/F!

PLEASE REMEMBER, NO CELL PHONES ARE ALLOWED IN THE CLASS. SERIOUSLY. DO NOT SIGN UP FOR THIS CLASS IF YOU CAN’T HANDLE THIS. (You will be marked absent if your phone is out during class.)

ATTENDANCE: For 0.5 credit, students can miss up to six classes (excused or unexcused) until they need to complete projects to make up for missed community (& communication) competencies. Students will have multiple options to demonstrate they’ve met these missed competencies.

US History Intensive
Melissa Park, 1st Semester 2019-20
Melissa's Room / Moon 101 : Mon/Tue/Wed/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

SS - US History 11A / 0.5; SS - US History 11B / 0.5

THIS CLASS MEETS DAILY, MON THRU FRI!

This U.S. History intensive will use reading, writing, art, poetry, discussion, debates, storytelling, role plays, videos, and classroom research to engage ourselves in a process of uncovering our collective and personal histories. We’ll approach history as a contested subject, one in which a multitude of peoples’ stories from different perspectives must be weighed and considered as we search for larger trends and truths in U.S. society. Examining history through a lens of race, class, gender, and power, and also rooted in centering peoples’ humanity, we’ll constantly ask whether the common stories we tell in U.S. history might be biased. If so, what purposes do they serve?

This class will cover American history from the Americas before the arrival of settler-colonialists through modern events and the present day. Examining the origins and maintenance of policies and ideas that shaped the concrete situations of our lives today is a major focus of the class. It will not focus on memorizing names, dates, and places. Instead, it will challenge students to think deeply and critically about historic trends and tensions within U.S. society. We’ll ask what sorts of power do groups of American people have, and what ways does power flow? In studying various time periods, we’ll question everything about what it means to be American and critical & dominant narratives about who is American? (See page 3 for a list of portfolios by historical topics). By the end of the semester, students should be able to construct cohesive narratives that connect current events to early U.S. history, including to our founding documents.

We’ll put a strong emphasis on developing history skills, including researching primary and secondary resources, oral histories, and public memory, spotting and evaluating bias, and developing critical and supported arguments. All students are eligible to earn honors credit, which will involve reading/listening to and working with Ibram X. Kendi’s Stamped From the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America, (and/or additional materials, TBD).

ALSO: through this class, interested seniors may complete their culminating social justice inquiry project, and juniors can get a head start!

This semester, we’ll be completing 6 portfolios. Tentatively, here’s what you can expect:
1. Portfolio 1: Indigeneity, the Americas & Native American Representation through the lens of pre-1492-1620
2. Portfolio 2: Settler-Colonialism, Slavery, Race & Capitalism [American Revolution & the Constitution], through the lens of 1600-1770; 1770-1800
3. Portfolio 3: Abolitionism, Reconstruction, and “democracy” through the lens of 1840-1877
4. Portfolio 4: Industrialization, Progressivism, Imperialism, and “the nadir of race relations” through the lens of 1877-1930
5. Portfolio 5: Migration, Immigration, and the American Dream through the lens of 1870s-1960s
6. Portfolio 6 part 1: Civil Rights Then & Now; Evolution of Mass Incarceration through the lens of 1870s-1975-2019
Portfolio 6 part 2: Vietnam, the Cold War, and Global Power through the lens of 1940s-2019

IMPORTANT: This is not one of those classes that has no homework. This is an upper level class, meaning that I’ll frequently require you to read, write, reflect, watch documentaries, and work on group projects outside of class. I try to space work out and be kind, but if you blow off the work, you’ll get behind and overwhelmed. You will not receive US History credit without completing the work outside of class. PLEASE KNOW that I am SO down to help you whenever and however I can so you can be successful in your learning and credit-earning in this class! Also, this IS a class in which interested seniors (and juniors wanting to get a head start) may complete their culminating social justice inquiry project.

PLEASE REMEMBER, NO CELL PHONES ARE ALLOWED IN THE CLASS. SERIOUSLY. DO NOT SIGN UP FOR THIS CLASS IF YOU CAN’T HANDLE THIS. (You will be marked absent if your phone is out during class.)

ATTENDANCE: For 1.0 credit, students can miss up to ten classes (excused or unexcused) until they need to complete projects to make up for missed community competencies. Students will have multiple options to demonstrate they’ve met these missed competencies.

Washington State History
Adam Croft, 2nd Semester 2019-20
Schoology and the city

SS - WA State History (Credit Bearing) / 0.25

Students will explore the history of the state of Washington through the following topical strands:
- Social justice;
- Oral histories;
- First nations;
- Civics and government structures;
- Geography;
- Earth and ecological history and dynamics;
- Economics.

• The class awards 0.25 WA State History credit. This counts as elective credit and fulfills the WA State History graduation requirement.
• There will be a 30 minute in-person orientation that every student must attend to be enrolled. We’ve got two options for that: Thursday, February 18th and Friday, February 19th. On both days, the orientation will happen at 2:30 in the computer lab. If students register for the class later in the semester, they’ll organize a one-on-one orientation with me or Adam.
• The class will be run entirely through Schoology, with all assignments posted there and turned in there.
• The class will require students to travel places around town (such as neighborhoods, parks, and museums) to complete some assignments.
• Students will be required to complete an online check-in at a minimum each week. This online check-in is our equivalent of attendance.
• Students are encouraged to collaborate and complete assignments together, but can also do them solo if they’d like.

World Economics 2
Brian Aytch, 2nd Semester 2019-20
#122 : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

None assigned

World Economics 3
Brian Aytch, 2nd Semester 2019-20
#122 : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:15-11:40

None assigned

World Languages

French Studies
Lydia Condrea, 2nd Semester 2019-20
RM #204 : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:15-11:40

WL - French 1A / 0.5; WL - French 1B / 0.5; WL - French 2A / 0.5; WL - French 2B / 0.5; WL - French 2B Proficiency / 0.5; WL - French 3A / 0.5; WL - French 3B / 0.5; WL - French 4A / 0.5

All world language classes will start with a week of introduction to Language Acquisition, taught in English. The goal of this part of the course is to provide students with understanding of language acquisition/learning process and to empower them in their endeavor of mastering a new language by making them aware about most effective strategies to be used for reaching that purpose. Afterwards, participants will explore different aspects of French culture, learning linguistic pattern, and applying them in various situations. The instruction is in French. Teaching strategies, as in all language classes at Nova, are targeting language acquisition rather than learning.
EARNING CREDIT: FULL CREDIT upon the condition of 1) PERFECT ATTENDANCE 2) HOMEWORK COMPLETED. Homework is to be completed, there is no such thing as turning the homework in, getting a grade on it or such, homework is the material with which we are working in class, students are changing whatever needs to be changed, take notes, more experienced students are contributing more, beginners observe, follow, progress. Those who do not complete the homework on a regular basis will receive partial credit, absences as well result in lost of part of the credit.
When the student feels ready to demonstrate competencies for 2B level (does not even have to take the class), they are to:
1) Take a written test; 2) Go through an interview; 3) Prepare a project in French, and present it to the class.

Demonstrating 2B or higher competencies assures for that student levels 1A, 1B, 2A, and 2B (or more for higher levels) on their transcript.

German Studies
Lydia Condrea, 2nd Semester 2019-20
RM #204 : Fri 14:35-16:00

WL - German 2 Comp NH (Novice High)*1.0 CR / 0.5

All world language classes will start with a week of introduction to Language Acquisition, taught in English. The goal of this part of the course is to provide students with understanding of language acquisition/learning process and to empower them in their endeavor of mastering a new language by making them aware about most effective strategies to be used for reaching that purpose. Afterwards, participants will explore different aspects of German culture, learning linguistic pattern, and applying them in various situations. Teaching strategies, as in all language classes at Nova, are targeting language acquisition rather than learning.

EARNING CREDIT: FULL CREDIT upon the condition of 1) PERFECT ATTENDANCE 2) HOMEWORK COMPLETED. Homework is to be completed, there is no such thing as turning the homework in, getting a grade on it or such, homework is the material with which we are working in class, students are changing whatever needs to be changed, take notes, more experienced students are contributing more, beginners observe, follow, progress. Those who do not complete the homework on a regular basis will receive partial credit, absences as well result in lost of part of the credit.
When the student feels ready to demonstrate competencies for 2B level (does not even have to take the class), they are to:
1) Take a written test; 2) Go through an interview; 3) Prepare a project in German, and present it to the class.

Demonstrating 2B or higher competencies assures for that student levels 1A, 1B, 2A, and 2B or, respectively, higher on their transcript.

Italian Studies
Lydia Condrea, 2nd Semester 2019-20
RM #204 : Mon/Wed/Fri 14:35-16:00

WL - Italian 1 Comp NM (Novice Mid)*1.0 CR / 0.5; WL - Italian 2 Comp NH (Novice High)*1.0 CR / 0.5

All world language classes will start with a week of introduction to Language Acquisition, taught in English. The goal of this part of the course is to provide students with understanding of language acquisition/learning process and to empower them in their endeavor of mastering a new language by making them aware about most effective strategies to be used for reaching that purpose. Afterwards, participants will explore different aspects of Italian culture, learning linguistic pattern, and applying them in various situations. The instruction is in Italian. Teaching strategies, as in all language classes at Nova, are targeting language acquisition rather than learning.

EARNING CREDIT: FULL CREDIT upon the condition of 1) PERFECT ATTENDANCE 2) HOMEWORK COMPLETED. Homework is to be completed, there is no such thing as turning the homework in, getting a grade on it or such, homework is the material with which we are working in class, students are changing whatever needs to be changed, take notes, more experienced students are contributing more, beginners observe, follow, progress. Those who do not complete the homework on a regular basis will receive partial credit, absences as well result in lost of part of the credit.
When the student feels ready to demonstrate competencies for 2B level (does not even have to take the class), they are to:
1) Take a written test; 2) Go through an interview; 3) Prepare a project in Italian, and present it to the class.

Demonstrating 2B or higher competencies assures for that student levels 1A, 1B, 2A, and 2B on their transcript.

Japanese Studies, beginning / intermediate
Lydia Condrea, 2nd Semester 2019-20
r. 201 : Mon/Wed/Fri 14:35-16:00

UE - Teacher Assistant (.25) / 0.5; WL - Japanese 1A / 0.5; WL - Japanese 2A / 0.5; WL - Japanese 3A / 0.5

All world language classes will start with a week of introduction to Language Acquisition, taught in English. The goal of this part of the course is to provide students with understanding of language acquisition/learning process and to empower them in their endeavor of mastering a new language by making them aware about most effective strategies to be used for reaching that purpose. Afterwards, participants will explore different aspects of Japanese culture, learning linguistic pattern, and applying them in various situations. This is an exploratory course, lead by students, advised and directed by Lydia. Learning strategies, as in all language classes at Nova, are targeting language acquisition rather than learning.

EARNING CREDIT: FULL CREDIT upon the condition of 1) PERFECT ATTENDANCE 2) HOMEWORK COMPLETED. Homework is to be completed, there is no such thing as turning the homework in, getting a grade on it or such, homework is the material with which we are working in class, students are changing whatever needs to be changed, take notes, more experienced students are contributing more, beginners observe, follow, progress. Those who do not complete the homework on a regular basis will receive partial credit, absences as well result in lost of part of the credit.
When the student feels ready to demonstrate competencies for 2B level (does not even have to take the class), they are to:
1) Take a written test; 2) Go through an interview; 3) Prepare a project in Japanese, and present it to the class.

Demonstrating 2B or higher competencies assures for that student levels 1A, 1B, 2A, and 2B on their transcript.

Modern Greek Studies
Lydia Condrea, 2nd Semester 2019-20
room 204 : Mon 14:35-16:00

WL - Greek 1 Comp NM (Novice-Mid)*1.0 CR / 0.5

All world language classes will start with a week of introduction to Language Acquisition, taught in English. The goal of this part of the course is to provide students with understanding of language acquisition/learning process and to empower them in their endeavor of mastering a new language by making them aware about most effective strategies to be used for reaching that purpose. Afterwards, participants will explore different aspects of Greek language and culture, learning linguistic pattern, and applying them in various situations. Listening activities will be prevalent, attendance is key to success. Teaching strategies, as in all language classes at Nova Project, are targeting language acquisition rather than learning.

EARNING CREDIT: FULL CREDIT upon the condition of 1) PERFECT ATTENDANCE 2) HOMEWORK COMPLETED. Homework is to be completed, there is no such thing as turning the homework in, getting a grade on it or such, homework is the material with which we are working in class, students are changing whatever needs to be changed, take notes, more experienced students are contributing more, beginners observe, follow, progress. Those who do not complete the homework on a regular basis will receive partial credit, absences as well result in lost of part of the credit.
When the student feels ready to demonstrate competencies for 2B level (does not even have to take the class), they are to:
1) Take a written test; 2) Go through an interview; 3) Prepare a project in Moderne Greek, and present it to the class.

Demonstrating 2B or higher competencies assures for that student levels 1A, 1B, 2A, and 2B on their transcript.

Russian Studies
Lydia Condrea, 2nd Semester 2019-20
r.204 : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:20-13:45

None assigned

Spanish Studies
Lydia Condrea, 2nd Semester 2019-20
RM #204 : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

WL - Spanish 1A / 0.5; WL - Spanish 1B / 0.5; WL - Spanish 2A / 0.5; WL - Spanish 2B / 0.5

All world language classes will start with a week of introduction to Language Acquisition, taught in English. The goal of this part of the course is to provide students with understanding of language acquisition/learning process and to empower them in their endeavor of mastering a new language by making them aware about most effective strategies to be used for reaching that purpose. Afterwards, participants will explore different aspects of Spanish culture, learning linguistic pattern, and applying them in various situations. The instruction is in Spanish. Teaching strategies, as in all language classes at Nova, are targeting language acquisition rather than learning.

EARNING CREDIT: FULL CREDIT upon the condition of 1) PERFECT ATTENDANCE 2) HOMEWORK COMPLETED. Homework is to be completed, there is no such thing as turning the homework in, getting a grade on it or such, homework is the material with which we are working in class, students are changing whatever needs to be changed, take notes, more experienced students are contributing more, beginners observe, follow, progress. Those who do not complete the homework on a regular basis will receive partial credit, absences as well result in lost of part of the credit.
When the student feels ready to demonstrate competencies for 2B level (does not even have to take the class), they are to:
1) Take a written test; 2) Go through an interview; 3) Prepare a project in Spanish, and present it to the class.

Demonstrating 2B or higher competencies assures for that student levels 1A, 1B, 2A, and 2B on their transcript.