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Found 13 courses.

Career & Technical Education CTE)

Animation Induction (Level 1, 10th grade and up)
Stefan Gruber, 2nd Semester 2017-18
Animation Lab 205 : Mon/Wed/Fri 14:35-16:00

CTE - Animation Tech Graphics 1 / 0.5

Open to all people of all levels of artistic talent from none to godly. Animation is a different art from drawing, so no drawing skills are necessary, only braveness. We’ll be exploring many techniques including 2D puppet, pixelation, flipbooks, clay. It’s a lot of fun and really good exercise for the imagination. We’ll also watch a lot of animation in here to get inspiration and meet with guest animators who make artistic animation for a living.

Hardware Programming
Akil Srinivasan, 2nd Semester 2017-18
Moon 120 - The Laboratory : Tue/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

CTE - Digital Design 1 / 0.5

Interested in programming devices? Want to design and figure out electrical circuits? We’ll explore micro controller programming (using Arduino’s) and figure out how to program them, and connect them to other electronic parts. In the process, you will follow a series of tutorials, then expand on them to build your own personal devices!

The emphasis is on good engineering design. No prior programming experience required! Students who took Programming last year may continue in this class, building on skills and projects from last year. New students with no experience are encouraged to join us as well!

Credit: Competencies will be shown through project proposals, design, parts sourcing, prototyping and testing, reflections, and discussion.
Available for CTE or 3rd Year Math credit
Christina Wright will be assessing and signing off on CTE credit.

We will also follow the 8 absence attendance policy, which will help keep you on top of things in this class.

In addition to the programming and hardware content, students are expected to

  • Listen with respect to another person’s explanation
  • Engage in discussion
  • Communicate ideas both informally and formally
  • Provide help when asked
  • Ask for help when needed;
  • Play an active role in sustaining a safe and encouraging learning space for one another
  • Treat all materials gently so that they may be reused.

Fine Arts

Acting
Melissa Park, 2nd Semester 2017-18
Dance room : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:20-13:45

ART - Theatre 1/Acting / 0.5

This class is taught by Nova alum (& actor/director) Beverly Poole!

Having the courage to stand in front of an audience is not always easy, but it is a skill that can be learned! In the acting class we will cover several aspects of theatre in this one class—improvisational work and devising, monologues, scenes, and reading through plays. At the end of the class there will be a low-key showcase of the things we are proudest of, put on by our class.

Getting into the head of a character is a great way to improve your writing, your art, and even just every day social interactions— plus it’s fun!

Fine Arts / Science

Summer Independent Contracts
Adam Croft, 1st Semester 2018-19
the world at large

None assigned

learning objectives dependent upon particular student’s inquiry

Language Arts

Summer - Meesh
Michelle Vecchio, SUMMER 2018

None assigned

The Art of Fiction
Debbie Kuttner, 2nd Semester 2017-18
Rm 220 - Debbie's Room : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

LA / 0.5

Let’s read books! Wait, what is a book in the 21st century? Let’s look at a variety of genres (science fiction, fantasy, sci fi, dystopias, horror, alternate history, historical fiction, magical realism, and more). And while we are at it, let’s make our own multimedia books—using found materials. Let’s build something we can all be proud of.
Students will be expected to read, sometimes with ears, sometimes with eyes, and sometimes with both. Students will be expected to write, sometimes with mouth, and sometimes with fingers—using a variety of implements.

Women in Film & Literature
Debbie Kuttner, 2nd Semester 2017-18
Rm 220 - Debbie's room : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

LA - 12B Comparative Lit & Comp / 0.5

In this version of “Senior/Junior Literature” this semester we will be reading/viewing a number of works that depict fictional women created by women, men and others. Our novels will include some of the following: The Poisonwood Bible, The Color Purple, The Good Earth, Sula, Madame Bovary, Jasmine, Their Eyes Were Watching God. We will also look at women depicted in film, and may choose to watch some or all of the following: Strangers in Good Company, Set it Off, La Femme Nikita, Nausicaa Valley of the Wind, Spirited Away, Passion Fish, Mississippi Masala, Trans America, Babette’s Feast, He Loves Me/He Loves Me Not, and others. We may also choose to read some essays and short stories by authors like Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Alice Walker, Helene Cixous, Audre Lorde, and more. Come prepared to read, listen and watch a lot of stories! and to discuss and write about them.

Language Arts / Social Studies

Camille's finished History of Racist Ideas credits
Melissa Park, 2nd Semester 2017-18

None assigned

This contract represents Camille’s completed credits for History of Racist Ideas, Spring 2018.

Science

Climate Justice
Adam Croft, 1st Semester 2018-19
Room 202 and beyond : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:20-13:45

SC - Science Seminar / 0.5

Our inquiry into climate change and environmental justice will be consistently framed within the context of the continuing historical dynamics of settler-colonialism.

In particular, we will seek to understand and create an ethic of climate justice grounded within scientific and historical understanding. Students will leave the course with a set of questions and understandings to help guide future relations between people and place.

Questions to be addressed by students participating in this course include:
- who is most vulnerable to climate change and related environmental challenges?
- how did these people come to be so vulnerable?
- what is the responsibility of wealthy nations toward poorer nations?
- what could climate justice look like?
- what is my role in enacting climate justice?
- what is the state of the planet and its life today?
- how is health/pollution distributed across the planet today and in this place?
- how has the climate crisis come about?
- how are/will these changes affect(ing) communities differently depending upon race, class, gender, age, sexuality, ability, etc.?
- how are/will these changes affect(ing) plants, animals, ecosystems, oceans, and the living planet (Gaia)?
- what does environmental justice look like in this and other places?
- what does a healthy human civilization living with and upon a healthy planet look like, in this and other places?

Environmental Justice
Adam Croft, 1st Semester 2018-19
Room 202 and beyond : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

SC - Science Seminar / 0.5

Students will explore the relations of human groups and places. In this course, we will question, challenge, analyze, and create the relations between humans and the Earth and how these relations have changed throughout human/Earth history. Most class topics will be determined by the course participants, though we will continue to relate these histories to those of the place within which this course is situated: Seattle, Puget Sound, Washington, Pacific Northwest, North America, …

In particular, we will seek to understand and create an ethic of place. Students will leave the course with a set of questions and understandings to help guide future relations between people and place.


WA State History credit is available for this course.*

Questions to be addressed by students participating in this course include:
- how have humans lived in this and other places?
- how are humans currently living in this and other places?
- how could humans live in this and other places?
- how does the Earth live in this and other places upon the Earth?
- what is the state of the planet and its life today?
- how is health/pollution distributed across the planet today and in this place?
- how has the climate crisis come about, and what is its relation to this place?
- how are/will these changes affect(ing) communities differently depending upon race, class, gender, age, sexuality, ability, etc.?
- how are/will these changes affect(ing) plants, animals, ecosystems, oceans, and the living planet (Gaia)?
- what does environmental justice look like in this and other places?
- what does a healthy human civilization living with and upon a healthy planet look like, in this and other places?

Life on Earth
Adam Croft, 2nd Semester 2017-18
Room 202 and beyond : Tue/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

SC - Biology 2 / 0.5

Students will explore the science and history of life on Earth. Students will be expected to develop a broad understanding of the dynamics of life on Earth while also taking on an inquiry and teaching project exploring a particular aspect of Earth’s life. This course will also prepare students for half of the Biology EOC competencies.

Scope and sequence:

I. What is life? How do we answer such a question? [research, classify, design]
a. Zones of exploration
i. Definition of life;
ii. Requirements for life;
iii. Classification of life.
b. Project: Design a viable creature.

II. How do organisms live together? How do we study these interactions? [research, observe, design, experiment]
a. Zones of exploration
i. Ecological relations;
ii. Human-induced changes.
b. Project: Design and conduct a field study.

III. How do organisms change over time? How do we know? [research, scheme]
a. Zones of exploration
i. Evolution by natural selection;
ii. Examples of evolution;
iii. Human evolution.
b. Project: Plausible evolution of creature.

IV. Biology EOC: practice and review

V. Final portfolio:
a. Guiding questions:
i. What have you accomplished?
ii. What have you learned?
iii. What are you still pondering?
iv. What are you still struggling over?
v. What will you take with you from this experience?
b. Portfolio:
i. Collected works from the semester
ii. Written reflection on above questions

Life on Earth
Adam Croft, 1st Semester 2018-19
Room 202 and beyond : Tue/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

SC - Biology 2 / 0.5

Students will explore the science and history of life on Earth. Students will be expected to develop a broad understanding of the dynamics of life on Earth while also taking on an inquiry and teaching project exploring a particular aspect of Earth’s life. This course will also prepare students for half of the Biology EOC competencies.

Scope and sequence:

I. What is life? How do we answer such a question? [research, classify, design]
a. Zones of exploration
i. Definition of life;
ii. Requirements for life;
iii. Classification of life.
b. Project: Design a viable creature.

II. How do organisms live together? How do we study these interactions? [research, observe, design, experiment]
a. Zones of exploration
i. Ecological relations;
ii. Human-induced changes.
b. Project: Design and conduct a field study.

III. How do organisms change over time? How do we know? [research, scheme]
a. Zones of exploration
i. Evolution by natural selection;
ii. Examples of evolution;
iii. Human evolution.
b. Project: Plausible evolution of creature.

IV. Biology EOC: practice and review

V. Final portfolio:
a. Guiding questions:
i. What have you accomplished?
ii. What have you learned?
iii. What are you still pondering?
iv. What are you still struggling over?
v. What will you take with you from this experience?
b. Portfolio:
i. Collected works from the semester
ii. Written reflection on above questions

Slow Time Outside
Adam Croft, 1st Semester 2018-19
Rooms 202 (Adam's) and 218 (Karen's) : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

SC - Science Seminar / 0.5

  • This course is co-taught by Karen K. and Adam C.! *

How can we think with our senses? Can we think like a plant, or a stream, or the wind? How can we express the living world through drawing and other artistic media? How can we learn to see, listen, smell, and sense the living world through the practices of art and science?


We will practice drawing as a foundation to seeing the living world. Nature study is a process in seeing, taking visual cues from nature. Drawings are dialogues between shapes, slowing down the process of making in order to see in a new way.


This course will explore the common ground of art and science found in the practice of drawing the living world. Key themes and skills include: field observation, learning applications, drawing, use of different media (ink, collage, etc.), the role of imagination in perception, participation, depth.


Assessment will be based upon depth of exploration, participation, and development of understanding based within the course activities and outside research. Students will keep a journal for sketching and writing and also read and reflect upon relevant literature.


Scope and sequence:


I. Getting to know this place.
a. Guiding questions:
i. What is this place?
ii. What lives here?
iii. How does it all connect?
iv. What is the feeling sense of this place?
v. How is this place organized in space and time?
vi. How does this place change over time?
b. Project: weekly field observations, drawings, etc. of a place on or just off of campus, collected into long-term field journal with reflections.


II. Expression of life
a. Guiding questions:
i. How do we practice imagination in support of perception?
ii. What does it mean to observe?
iii. What are we able to observe?
iv. How do we express our imagination?
v. How do we use different media in pursuit of expression?
b. Project:
i. Art: Portfolio of an organism: observe, imagine, and express your understanding of and relation to another lifeform using media you have explored in this course.
ii. Science: Diary of an organism: observe, imagine, and research a particular organism, tracking its changes over time and communicating your understanding through words, diagrams, drawings.


III. Final portfolio:
a. Guiding questions:
i. What have you accomplished?
ii. What have you learned?
iii. What are you still pondering?
iv. What are you still struggling over?
v. What will you take with you from this experience?
b. Portfolio:
i. Collected works from the semester
ii. Written reflection on above questions