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Career & Technical Education CTE)

Band
Michelle Vecchio, 2nd Semester 2018-19

None assigned

Prerequisites: A willingness to play music with a group of people. Music talent or instruments are not required. Sign up early, the class is limited to 8 bands. No limit to the size of the band, though all members must participate in the final show (unless previously agreed on, with the coordinators approval)

Level: What you make it.

Description: This is a class in which you will create musical groups (of any nature) and be asked to come up with a 10-15 minute set to perform. Your band will also be required to play a cover song, randomly selected from a hat. We will also try to record some songs from each band. If you have always wanted to be in a band, or even if that urge is brand new, this is your chance.

You do not need to already know how to play an instrument, you only need a love of music and a willingness to participate. Please understand it is up to you to get into a band and stay in it, I will not be placing you in one.

Career Choices
Jennifer Spigner, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Room 221 : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:15-11:40

CTE - Career Choices 1 / 0.5

Are you an 11th and 12th grader?
Do you wonder about the world of the work?
Are you concerned about how to find and keep a job?
Come to this class and you will become an expert.
I can provide assistance in your job search and college/career options for any age.

Career Research
Identify personal skills, interests and abilities and relate them to current career choices.
Present information to class on career interests
Professional/Soft Skills/Collaborate
Resume building
Interviewing Skills
Health and Safe in the workplace

Digital Music (Beats!)
Susan Watters, 2nd Semester 2018-19
120 The Lab : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

CTE - Recording Arts Tech 1 / 0.5

Course Description:
Students in this course will learn how to make music with Ableton Live and Push, and gain foundations in the physics and science of sound and digital audio. Concepts in this course can be translated to video, storytelling, and many types of programming, all while having fun making beats and music. Each student will have access to a digital workstations to create original music. Additionally, students will learn to record, perform, sequence, and manipulate sound.

Experimental Animation (Advanced)
Stefan Gruber, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Animation Labs : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:15-11:40

CTE - Animation Tech Graphics 2 / 0.5

Experimental Animation is a workshop designed to make the materials and resources available for the independent animator. 1st semester focuses on developing soundtracks before animation, so that lip-synch is possible. We will be able to have a professional style punched-paper animation area, one or two long-term 3-D animation setups; Flash will be available as well. Materials: Most supplies are supplied; some self-budget (probably under $20) may be needed. The finished works made in this class are burned to DVD and shown in a theatrical setting at the end of the 2nd semester.

Fashion Design
Susan Watters, 2nd Semester 2018-19
221 : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

CTE - Apparel & Textiles I / 0.5

This class will be facilitated by Maria Bischof from Foundry 10.

All experience levels are welcome but be prepared to work in class, this is a “hands on” class.

We will read & create patterns, cut, serge, sew, iron.

Hardware Programming
Akil Srinivasan, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Moon 120 - The Laboratory : Tue/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

CTE - Digital Design 1 / 0.5

Interested in programming devices? Want to design and figure out electrical circuits? We’ll explore micro controller programming (using Arduino’s) and figure out how to program them, and connect them to other electronic parts. In the process, you will follow a series of tutorials, then expand on them to build your own personal devices!

The emphasis is on good engineering design. No prior programming experience required! Students who took Programming last year may continue in this class, building on skills and projects from last year. New students with no experience are encouraged to join us as well!

Credit: Competencies will be shown through project proposals, design, parts sourcing, prototyping and testing, reflections, and discussion.
Available for CTE, 3rd Year Math credit, or science seminar credit
Christina Wright will be assessing and signing off on CTE credit.

We will also follow the 8 absence attendance policy, which will help keep you on top of things in this class.

In addition to the programming and hardware content, students are expected to

  • Listen with respect to another person’s explanation
  • Engage in discussion
  • Communicate ideas both informally and formally
  • Provide help when asked
  • Ask for help when needed;
  • Play an active role in sustaining a safe and encouraging learning space for one another
  • Treat all materials gently so that they may be reused.

Nova Farm
Susan Barth, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Susan's Room #3 and the garden : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:20-13:45

CTE - Env Horticulture 1 / 0.5

In this class, you will experience botany, horticulture, construction, farming and social justice around food. You will work on the farm, cultivate crops, cook, create and carry out inquiry based experiments to support your learning, learn about environmental issues surrounding agriculture and do projects catered to your interests, including leadership, internships, and career paths. Be prepared to get dirty. This spring we will ready and plant raised beds with food crops, grow seed starts for the plant sale, work on landscaping, art and building. Come learn how to use power tools. Grow stuff, the bees need you.

This class can be taken for Occ. Ed. or Science, depending on what your focus is. You will need to work the details out with Susan.

A graduation Social Justice Project could be done in this class.

Open Animation Portal
Stefan Gruber, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Room 205 : Mon/Wed/Fri 14:35-16:00

CTE - Animation Tech Graphics 2 / 0.5

Open Portal is a way to extend your projects from other animation classes into a bigger project. For instance, if you have a 300 frame animation piece and want to color it, add shadows, and textures for a more professional feel, this is the place to do that. It also doubles as a place where you can be if you want extra time working on your assignments for Comics, Games, and Animation Class.

Work Site Coordination
Jennifer Spigner, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Room 111, Jennifer's Office

CTE - Hospitality Worksite / 0.5

Work-based learning activities extend the classroom into the workplace, connecting acquired knowledge and skills to a student’s future employment. Each student’s individual learning objectives, or goals will be articulated in the first meeting among the student, their suprevisor, and the WBL coordinator(me). They will be different for each student.

I will enter these goals after the first meeting.

Committee

Action Faction and/or Safety
Eyva Winet, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Moon 120 and Trans Resource Center : Thu 13:50-14:30

SS - Student Government / 0.25

Students can do Action Faction or Safety or Both. there is plenty of work in both committees to do work on both Tuesdays and Thursdays for either committee or split your time with another committee.

Action Faction Mission Statement:
As an all-inclusive committee, we work to create a safe and respectful community for all genders and sexualities. We combat sexuality and gender identity oppression by creating positive actions in Nova and beyond. Positive actions include maintaining safe spaces for discussions, resources and events. We believe that any social justice movement must work towards inclusion of other social justice goals. We recognize that all oppressions are connected and in no way do we want our actions to propagate other forms of oppression.
Competencies

plan and execute social justice projects that support organizations efforts to end gender and sexuality injustice
learn about power and privilege
explore the interdependence of multiple oppressions
create and execute our own projects that will work toward gender and sexuality injustices
find levity and joy in this hard work
spread sass and camp to the world

Safety: By popular demand and necessity for keeping our behinds covered, a new committee has been created to address issues of physical and emotional safety at Nova! It was given the following powers by United Nova: writing the district safety plan, improving our disaster preparedness, being in charge of drills, reviewing and evaluating emergencies and improving our process of addressing emergencies, managing shared public spaces at Nova, including outdoor spaces, helping resolve issues that make students, staff and/or the community feel unsafe, supporting restorative processes when Nova Norms are broken and physical or emotional safety is compromised.

Budget Committee
Lance Brown, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Lance's Room, B-19 : Thu 13:50-14:30

SS - Student Government / 0.15

This committee is responsible for the fiscal decisions of Nova. The Friends of Nova (formerly the PTSA) raises funds for student and teacher use. It’s the role of this committee to oversee the equitable distribution of these funds. Furthermore, Nova is the only school in the District that has the privilege of designating where and how our school budget is spent. This is the forum within which those conversations and decisions are made.

The learning goals of this committee are:
1. to learn how to read and interpret a fiscal spread sheet;
2. to participate in group decision making;
3. to engage in conversations about equity and opportunity within our community;
4. to provide a space where all students and school groups feel heard and valued and where their proposals are taken seriously;
5. to explore ways to communicate our decisions and dilemmas within the Nova community;
6. to observe and participate in a formal committee structure, including a mild form of Robert’s Rules of Order;
7. and to have the experience of facilitating the running of the committee.

Debate Committe
Lance Brown, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Lance's Room B19 : Wed 13:50-14:30

UE - Leadership / 0.5

OUR MISSION:
Debate Committee connects, supports, and inspires a diverse community
committed to empowering students through competitive speech and debate

Dungeons and Dragons
Brian Aytch, 2nd Semester 2018-19
RM# 122 : Wed 13:50-14:30

UE - Student Activity / 0.15

Dungeons and Dragons is one of most famous and exciting role play game ever created. Imagine a world where a person can create their own character and go on great adventures under the guidance of a creative dungeon master. This is the committee where imagination is the only limit.

Group Coping (DBT and other coping skills)
Eyva Winet, 2nd Semester 2018-19
120 : Fri 13:50-14:30

UE - Personal Growth / 0.25

learn the skills to set boundaries while supporting peers and other loved-ones
practice them in life
share learning
build a community of students with stronger emotional intelligence

Guild
Lydia Wynn, 2nd Semester 2018-19
207 - Winnie's Room

SS - Student Government / 0.25

The purpose of guild is to promote events that strengthen the community involvement of Nova.
Students in guild will:
*Plan various events
*Support fundraisers
*Organize prom

  • Engage in the needs/desires of other Nova students.
    *Represent all student activities and interests.

Hiring and Review
Adam Croft, 2nd Semester 2018-19
room 202 : Thu 13:50-14:30

SS - Student Government / 0.15

Terrance will be co-facilitating this committee!

This committee will collect feedback about teachers and coordinators at Nova and share that feedback with teachers and coordinators. We will also participating in hiring new positions and collecting information from the school about FTE needs when hiring needs to take place.

Peace of Mind
Akil Srinivasan, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Dance Room - B01 : Fri 13:50-14:30

UE - Student Activity / 0.15

We will practice weekly formal mindfulness meditation. No experience necessary! Many studies show that daily meditation can help us deal with a host of mental health issues such as anxiety and depression and help with stress reduction as well!

Planet Nova
Adam Croft, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Room 202 and beyond : Tue/Fri 13:50-14:30

UE - Leadership / 0.15

Let’s tend to our school’s relation to the Earth and each other, including through maintaining and strengthening our systems for composting, energy conservation, environmental justice, ecological awareness, and anything else we can do for our living community.

POC Committee
Melissa Park, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Tuesdays & Wednesdays: Melissa's room, Moon 101 : Tue/Wed 13:50-14:30

SS - Student Government / 0.25

The People of Color Committee (POCC) is a meeting place for students and staff who identify as people of color.

We meet to build community and hold space for POC students and staff to develop and practice their leadership skills and discuss issues of race and equity in a safe and open environment. Along with Chelsey, Akil, Brian, and Melissa, students will facilitate committee meetings & projects, on a rotating-signups basis.

At the end of January, we’re nearing the completion of a warm clothing drive to donate to shelter and support services for Seattle youth. We’re excited to continue to program events at school (e.g. our ongoing “White Suprema-TEA” workshop series focused on racial equity teaching & learning), organize field trips, continue collaborating with local organizations, and holding space for people to reflect on our experiences as POC at Nova and Seattle at large, and act to increase racial justice and equity.

Per Eyva’s 1/31/19 email to staff:

Last year’s committee proposal added a .25 student government credit per semester of Nova attendance and removed the requirement of school service. We should not be assigning student government credit unless students actively participated in a governing committee. Coming and just being in the room would not meet that competency. I think for this first semester of the change [Fall 2018] we can have some flexibility about assigning this credit but I will go back and pull competencies out of both the proposal and Adam’s culminating project work and share those in the next couple weeks.

My suggestion is that we look at them together with our governing committees/refine edit and then agree to them as a staff and all use them in our governing committee contracts and really hold students to them. If they come but don’t meet those competencies we can give them UE credit. This is part of our 24 credit plan so it is legit that it is social studies credit (and never world history). We are honoring the citizenship learning we are expecting from students to be part of the Nova community.

Per Susan Watters’ 1/31/19 email to staff [same email thread]:

Here is the course description for Student Government: Student leaders, elected and appointed, meet regularly to set standards, encourage student participation in school activities, enhance school environment, both physical and academic, and to provide leadership for the student body.

STUDENT LEARNING OBJECTIVES (SLO’S)
1. Students will demonstrate high standards of behavior and leadership qualities.
2. Students will set an example for the rest of the student body.
3. Students will see themselves as a positive part of the school population rather than a separate unit.
4. Each student will have made a contribution which adds to the enrichment of the school.
This is a Social Studies credit.

Poster Brigade/Building Art - THURS (Governing Committee)
Becky Laird, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Becky's Room - 201 : Thu 13:50-14:30

UE - Leadership / 0.15

Poster Brigade works in collaboration with the rest of the Nova community to create posters and flyers for Nova events and to help disseminate important information to the community. Poster Brigade is held as a quiet space.

Poster Brigade/Building Art - TUES (Governing Committee)
Becky Laird, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Becky's Room - 201 : Tue 13:50-14:30

UE - Leadership / 0.15

Poster Brigade works in collaboration with the rest of the Nova community to create posters and flyers for Nova events and to help disseminate important information to the community. Poster Brigade is held as a quiet space.

Recruitment Committee
Debbie Kuttner, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Earth B20 : Tue/Thu 13:50-14:30

SS - Student Government / 0.25

Recruitment Committee oversees the functioning of all recruitment-related activities here at Nova. In particular, this committee can make decisions that effect how Nova is going about bringing new students into our community as well as how we are perceived by those potential new recruits.

We need students in order to be a school! And we need people to know about Nova and want to come here in order to get those students! Basically, Recruitment is essential to the survival of Nova and all that we are doing here.

Decisions are made through consensus-building whenever possible.

Senior Committee
Mark Perry, COOR 2018-19
Mark's Room 121 : Thu 13:50-14:30

None assigned

Senior Committee supports all of the 2018-19 potential graduates. The committee meets weekly and discusses and plans ways and activities to support seniors ability to graduate and walk at graduation. This year graduation committee is also planning community service activities. During second semester, Senior Committee will plan the graduation ceremony. Through this process students will learn to work together, develop and activate plans and create a graduation plan and ceremony for the 2018-19 graduation.

Sound Committee
Michelle Vecchio, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Band Room

None assigned

Video Game Social Committee
Julia Reade, 1st Semester 2018-19
Room 208 : Fri 13:50-14:30

UE - Personal Growth / 0.25

This INVITE ONLY committee is a structured, student-lead committee designed to offer students an opportunity to further develop their social skills. The group will gather around a common interest—gaming—and engage in discussions about this topic.

Walk the Walk
Jennifer Spigner, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Room 111 : Thu 13:50-14:30

SS - Student Government / 0.15

The Walk The Walk Committee is committed to providing a centralized list of service learning opportunities for students with a social justice focus to volunteering in the community. This committee will keep a list of service learning opportunities for students and staff to access. The committee is in the initial stages so we are asking staff to please forward any opportunities to the three of us members listed below so we can start compiling the service learning list.

Yearbook & Art Share Committee
Allison Sterrett, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Rm 3- Susan : Tue 13:50-14:30

UE - Leadership / 0.25

The Yearbook & Art Share Committee will meet both Tuesdays and Thursdays in Susan’s room (B03). We are looking for all types of folks to brainstorm, create, work with technology, organize etc. No experience necessary, just a strong willingness to contribute! This committee will be facilitated by Susan and Allison. Goals:

1. Yearbook: We are looking for motivated, organized, creative types (you do not need to have all of those traits together). We want photographers, designers, and computer types to help us. We want to capture the amazingness of our community. We also want the yearbook to be affordable for all who want it, so we will be figuring out new and creative ways to fundraise.

2. Art Shares: Historically, students have planned, facilitated, and performed in Art Share events one or more times per month with the goal of making space for creative expression and celebrating the talents of the Nova community. The Art Share team plans to expand their programming to reach more Nova students as well as to bring outside artists to our community.

The basic credit is .25 per semester, depending on the amount of work you put in.

Elective

Chess and its Variants
Stefan Gruber, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Animation Lab : Wed 11:40-12:20

Electives / 0.25

Your objective will be to improve your chess playing abilities, and learn some variations on the chess rules.

Fine Arts

advanced studio art and portfolio
karen kosoglad, 2nd Semester 2018-19
room 219 : Wed 14:35-16:00

ART - Exploring the Arts / 0.5

This is a 1.5 hour class meeting on Wednesday at 2:35 . Students can start at committee time. This class is designed for advanced individualized studio exploration for portfolio creation. Ceramics, printmaking, drawing painting and mixed media collage will be available.

art survey: Jewelry Exploration
karen kosoglad, 2nd Semester 2018-19
219 : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

ART - Jewelry / 0.5

Learning Objectives

This is an advanced art class and a prerequisite of other art classes is required or student can show a portfolio of work. New students are encouraged to build a foundation in slow time and drawing into printmaking.

We will be developing processes to make all kinds of wearable art including enameling, soldering, metal etching, sawing metal, reclaimed/up cycling,small sculpture, fiber arts and more. This class will include research, inquiry, material acquisition, creative play. Wire and combining materials will be explored. We will use sketching nature and natural forms for inspiration.

This is an art survey class of both 2 and 3 dimensional design. Students will be invited to explore many art mediums and techniques. Printmaking ,drawing, painting, and sculpture will be offered. There will be a focus on the foundations of visual art and design.

A Sketchbook is required.

Learning Requirements

1.
The student understands and applies arts knowledge , and visual arts.
1.1.
Understands and applies arts concepts and vocabulary.
1.2.
Develops arts skills and techniques.
1.3.
Understands and applies arts genres and styles of various artists, cultures, and times.
2.1.
Applies a creative process to the arts.
2.2.

The student communicates through the arts.

Ceramics
karen kosoglad, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Art Room #31 : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:15-11:40

ART - Ceramics / 0.5

This class is for all levels. Students will be introduced to basic techniques of working with clay. Learning how to center the clay, hand building and sculpture will be explored. Many different glaze applications will be introduced. Students will learn about function and form through their exploration of clay and process.

Sketch book mixed media collage
karen kosoglad, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Art Room #31 : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

ART - Multimedia 1 / 0.5

Facilitate and introduce a variety Arts Medium with a focus on sketch books. students will collage and learn printmaking techniques and produce individual portfolios. Exploration of a diverse approach to printmaking through, mono prints, collographs, linoleum block, dry point, silk screen, reduction prints, 3 color blocks and image transfers. Through a combination of many printing techniques students can combine and alter their final images..

Small books mixed media collage and printmaking
karen kosoglad, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Art Room #31 : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

ART - Printmaking / 0.5

Facilitate and introduce a variety Arts Medium with a focus on sketch books. students will collage and learn printmaking techniques and produce individual portfolios. Exploration of a diverse approach to printmaking through, mono prints, collagraphs, linoleum block, dry point, silk screen, reduction prints, 3 color blocks and image transfers. Through a combination of many printing techniques students can combine and alter their final images.. there will be a structure brought into focus to build students foundations. drawing from life,nature, models and looking at the alphabet as a graphic design construct

Yes, and...
Julia Reade, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Vida Room 208

ART - Theatre 1/Acting / 0.5

Improv and art games. This class will be in two parts: weekly improve workshops with Action Faction (an improve school for nuero-divergent learners) and visual art workshops hosted by Vida. The joining theme will be participatory, process focused, student-centered curriculum.

Fine Arts / Science

INDEPENDENT CONTRACT
karen kosoglad, 2nd Semester 2018-19
219

None assigned

INDEPENDENT CONTRACT
ct -

Individual content goals, EALR’s and course/credit code(s) will be included in the enrollment section for each student contract.

Learning Requirements
Communication
1.
The student uses listening and observation skills and strategies to gain understanding. To meet this standard, the student:
1.1.
Uses listening and observation skills and strategies to focus attention and interpret information.
1.2.
Understands, analyzes, synthesizes, or evaluates information from a variety of sources.
2.
The student uses communication skills and strategies to interact/work effectively with others. To meet this standard, the student:
2.1.
Uses language to interact effectively and responsibly in a multicultural context.
2.2.
Uses interpersonal skills and strategies in a multicultural context to work collaboratively, solve problems, and perform tasks.
2.3.
Uses skills and strategies to communicate interculturally.
3.
The student uses communication skills and strategies to present ideas and one’s self in a variety of situations. To meet this standard, the student:
3.1.
Uses knowledge of topic/theme, audience, and purpose to plan presentations.
3.2.
Uses media and other resources to support presentations.
3.3.
Uses effective delivery. The student analyzes and evaluates the effectiveness of communication. To meet this standard, the student:
4.1.
Assesses effectiveness of one’s own and others’ communication.
4.2.
Sets goals for improvement.

Wednesday Resource
Michelle Vecchio, 2nd Semester 2018-19

None assigned

Health

Gender Tea
Eyva Winet, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Sanctuary B20 : Wed 13:50-14:30; Fri 13:50-14:30

UE - Personal Growth / 0.25

Gender Tea
Is the gender binary getting you down? How about the gender hierarchy? Tired of other people telling you what your identity is or should be or that your doing it wrong? Want to drink tea and chat with other rad people who want to talk about gender, sex and sexuality in a safe and supportive space? Want to imagine space where all bodies are safe, free and celebrated? Want to work toward creating that here and now? Everyone is welcome and encouraged to come as long as you can agree to the safety norms grown in the group.

We will also be reading books this semester. Talk to Eyva about Health or other kinds of credit.

Health
Julia Reade, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Julia Room 208 : Tue/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

HE - Health Education HS / 0.5

Together, we will investigate the following health topics, decentering white narratives and centering the stories and experiences of marginalized groups. Students will follow their individual inquiry more deeply into related subtopics to create a project that communicates their research.

1. Wellness
2. Safety
3. Sexual Health
4. Social Emotional Health
5. Substance Abuse and Misuse
6. Nutrition

Language Arts

Essay spring 19
Debbie Kuttner, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Debbie's Room 220 : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

LA / 0.5

This course is designed for anyone who wishes to write more powerful, interesting, and thoughtful essays of all types: expository, narrative, persuasive, compare/contrast, analytical, and more. Before writing we will engage in activities that will enhance and inform the writing process. We will read published essays and consider issues of qualities (ideas, organization, voice, word choice, sentence fluency, conventions, theses, transitions, and more). Each week we will practice some aspect of essay writing, consider the techniques of published writing, and share our own works in progress. Note: For credit you will write six polished essays and complete in-class writing and reading assignments, and perhaps seminar a published essay.
ATTENDANCE: Students are allowed to miss six classes (excused or unexcused) until they have to begin doing projects to make up for the lost hours not in class. If students don’t make up this time they are only eligible for a maximum of 0.25 credit until they do.

Know
The Dark Knight Batman, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Room 102 : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:20-13:45

LA - LA 12B Honors / 0.5

THIS CLASS IS FOR JUNIORS AND SENIORS ONLY.

NO CELL PHONES IN THIS CLASS. IF YOU CAN’T DEAL WITH THAT DON’T TAKE THIS CLASS.

You are the experience.

Expect to work toward understanding your life.
Expect to speak a great deal in this class.
Expect to move.
Expect to read.
Expect to be there.
Expect to write.

NovaKnows
Debbie Kuttner, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Debbie's Room 220 : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:20-13:45

LA - Journalism Writing / 0.5

There is an art to writing for yourself. Some call it narrative essay, some call it blogging, or journalling or sometimes it’s just about getting your ideas out there onto the interwebs and sharing your thoughts about music, movies, books, video games, politics, art, etc. In this class students will learn how to communicate ideas to an audience. There will be opportunities for writing reviews, interviews, research, and narratives. Some students will step up to be peer editors, some to work on the technical side (wordpress is our platform); some students will choose to write weekly columns, or to be investigative reporters. We will make decisions as a community of learners, perhaps tying ourselves directly with committees or other Nova/community entities (like facilitating a space for the PTSA, coor groups, Douglas Truth library, and more).

Check out novaknows.com and come and make it more of what it is, or something completely different.

Some Films
The Dark Knight Batman, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Room 102 : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

LA - LA 12B Honors / 0.5

This class will help you earn your ethnic studies credit.
CONTENT AND PHONE WARNINGS: THIS CLASS WILL DISCUSS ISSUES OF RACE, POWER, PRIVILEGE, GENDER, EQUALITY, DEATH, LIFE, FREEDOM, CONTROL, BEAUTY, AND REALITY. DO NOT TAKE THE CLASS IF ANY OF THESE ISSUES WILL BE TOO DIFFICULT FOR YOU TO MANAGE.
NO CELL PHONES WILL BE ALLOWED IN CLASS. YOU WILL BE COUNTED ABSENT IF YOU PULL YOURS OUT WITHOUT PERMISSION. IF YOU CAN’T DEAL WITH THIS THEN DO NOT TAKE THE CLASS.
We will study different types of story arcs and archetypes through viewing and discussion different films and documentaries. Each film will have a project that will be due for it, and will be created within the context of the film and discussion in class. Some of the films we MIGHT watch are:
“Get Out”
“Boyz in the Hood”
“Black Klansman”
“Children of Men”
“Yojimbo”
“I Am Not Your Negro”
“Moonlight”
“The Big Sick”
“Smoke Signals”
“Reel Indian”
“Do the Right Thing”
“Set it Off”
“Get on the Bus”
“No Country for Old Men”
“When We Were Kings”

and many others. If you are interested in films and/or stories this would be a good class to take.

Studio Ghibli
Debbie Kuttner, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Rm 220 - Debbie's : Tue/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

LA - 10B World LIT & COMP / 0.5

We will watch four or more films from Studio Ghibli, including but not limited to Princess Mononoke, Naussica of the Valley of the Wind, and Spirited Away. We will discuss, analyze, evaluate, and find joy in the films and then produce work reflective of our experiences intellectual and heartfelt. The four products from this class will include one project, one essay, and one creative writing. Each product will go through a drafting phase.

The Art of Fiction
Debbie Kuttner, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Rm 220 - Debbie's Room : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

LA / 0.5

Let’s read books! Wait, what is a book in the 21st century? Let’s look at a variety of genres (science fiction, fantasy, sci fi, dystopias, horror, alternate history, historical fiction, magical realism, and more). And while we are at it, let’s make our own multimedia books—using found materials. Let’s build something we can all be proud of.
Students will be expected to read, sometimes with ears, sometimes with eyes, and sometimes with both. Students will be expected to write, sometimes with mouth, and sometimes with fingers—using a variety of implements.

The Art of Writing
The Dark Knight Batman, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Room 102 : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

LA / 0.5

NO CELL PHONES IN THIS CLASS. IF YOU CAN’T DEAL WITH THAT DON’T TAKE THIS CLASS.

And the great God, Shub la Pulesh, pronounced the written word. AND IT WAS GOOD!
Then the great God, Shub la Pulesh, pronounced that the written word could be poetry, short story, essay, letters to friends, comments, grocery lists, etc. And the list grew and grew of what the written word could be. AND IT WAS GOOD!
Then the great God, Shub la Pulesh, pronounced that a teacher must be born to offer a room where this could happen. So, out of the mud and the grime of this wheat thresher of a world was brought a man. TERRANCE, HE SHALL BE CALLED!!!!! the great God, Shub la Pulesh, cried. AND IT WAS BETTER THAN GOOD!!!
The great God, Shub la Pulesh, proclaimed that sometimes one would read what one had written out loud. AND THAT WOULD BE VERY GOOD INDEED!
And then and verily and finally the great God, Shub la Pulesh, pronounced, LET US TAKE ALL OF THESE WRITINGS AND COMPILE THEM INTO A PORTFOLIO AND THEN WHEN THE END COMES WE SHALL CULL OUT THE GREATEST OF THE GREAT AND MAKE THEM INTO A BOOK! YES! EACH OF YOU WILL MAKE A BOOK!!!!! AND THOSE BOOKS….THEY SHALL BE GOOOOOOOOD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
And the Earth shook from the magnitude of the great god, Shub la Pulesh’s, statement, but settled back down again so that students could come to Room 41 on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday to write and read the great words.

The Naked Truth on Stereotypes
Melissa Park, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Melissa's room, Moon #101 : Mon/Wed/Fri 14:35-16:00

LA / 0.5

NO CELL PHONES ARE ALLOWED IN THE CLASS. HAVE YOUR CELL PHONE OUT IN CLASS AND YOU’LL BE MARKED ABSENT. And I am NOT cool with earbuds in people’s ears during class—seriously. ATTENDANCE: Rack up more than 6 absences (excused or unexcused), and your maximum credit drops to 0.25 until you make up for the competencies/lost hours not in class.

This is a Language Arts class for students who are the most frequently “invisibilized,” marginalized, and/or vulnerable to harmful stereotyping in mainstream society/culture, media, public policy and/or at school. All stereotypes objectify, judge, deny, and ultimately, exaggerate myths about who we are as individuals and communities, while limiting our abilities to express our whole truth and the fullness of who and what we want to be.

The Naked Truth On Stereotypes is a class about cultivating your voice and the power you already have inside you. Chelsey, LIO, Ahava, and Melissa will co-teach the class this semester. Our class goals are:

REFLECTION – deepen understanding of self & “other”
EXPLORATION – expose and debunk socially constructed myths of identity & stereotypes
CREATION – practice art to expand & amplify the collective creative power of community
CELEBRATION – celebrate our stories: all of them
ACTION – inspire & incite radical action to uproot systems of domination & dehumanization

Our work towards these goals include:
- critically reading and responding to poetry and prose on race, gender, class, sexuality, intersectional identities, and the role of the artist in society.
- connecting our individual experiences to systemic issues; questioning & analyzing history and current events through the lenses of power and privilege
- challenging ourselves and others to think deeply and critically on the above
- completing an individual inquiry project and related assignments on race, power, privilege, identity, justice, art, community
- active listening
- daily writing
- learning/using poetry tools in our writing
- role-plays and Theater of the Oppressed activities

No poetry writing experience is necessary. Students will perform their poetry in a culminating performance for an audience.

Weird Fiction
The Dark Knight Batman, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Room 102 : Tue/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

LA - 12B Comparative Lit & Comp / 0.5

NO CELL PHONES WILL BE ALLOWED IN CLASS. YOU WILL BE COUNTED ABSENT IF YOU PULL YOURS OUT WITHOUT PERMISSION. IF YOU CAN’T DEAL WITH THIS THEN DO NOT TAKE THE CLASS.
WARNINGS: WE WILL LOOK AT ISSUES AND THEIR WILL BE MENTION OF SUCH THINGS AS DEATH, REALITY, HORROR, BLOOD, MONSTERS, HUMAN MONSTERS, NOTHINGNESS, THE VOID, MEANING.

Bella Daly and Terrance will be teaching this class.

Weird Fiction is a genre that incorporates aspects of horror, science fiction, fiction, fantasy, and various other genres. In general though, weird fiction is simply odd. It moves its readers to consider the meaning of their lives and the purpose of reality. It is also a genre that has waaaay more writers of color than all the genres I listed earlier in this paragraph.

In this class we will be watching a few films, reading the novella by Victor LaValle, “The Ballad of Black Tom”, and looking at a lot of short stories. Bella is going to take you through a way to use art and/or a super cool writing process to find and/or create meaning in the pieces that we look at.

You will learn how to write a short story, do short writing exercises, create projects, build a monster, question your reality, write an essay, discuss, and then discuss some more, and look at different philosophies attached to this genre.

If you took THE NEW AWAKE a few years ago, this class will have some overlap, but there will be some new stories.

Language Arts / Fine Arts

Nova Drama Class
Melissa Park, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Rm 221 : Mon/Wed/Fri 14:35-16:00

ART - Theatre 1/Acting / 0.5; LA / 0.5

Come put on the school play! If you are interested in design, sound, costuming, crafting, acting, stage managing, or learning about any of these things, come join us as we put on a show for the school (Play To Be Decided). This class will be worth 1.0 fine arts or LA credit, and will be Mondays, Wednesday, and every other Friday, 2:30-5:00pm. This class will be taught by play director/stage actor (and Nova alum) Beverly Poole.

Language Arts / Social Studies

Ethnic Studies WH
Mark Perry, 1st Semester 2018-19
Cloud 221 - Mark : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:20-13:45

LA / 0.5; WHist / 0.5

Intro to Ethnic Studies is a world history class focusing on the experiences of peoples around the world who’ve played/continue to play critical roles in shaping the modern world, yet whose experiences and perspectives are frequently absent from and/or distorted by mainstream narratives of world history.

We will unpack what are dominant narratives—what they do, and why/how they persist—and work to uncover, analyze, and reconcile with counter narratives to broaden our understandings of how the past continues to shape the present (e.g., to determine why and how things change and/or stay the same for various peoples and the planet). Race/ethnicity, gender, class, power, and culture are primary lenses we’ll work with to research complex historic events. We will study interesting cases in the last 500 years in and outside of the US through thematic units on [tentatively:] colonialism and imperialism, immigration and migration, and liberation and decolonization.

EXPECT TO COMPLETE HOMEWORK OUTSIDE OF CLASS EVERY WEEK TO BE ON-TRACK FOR FULL CREDIT. Students wanting to earn world history credit will work on history-focused assignments, complementary to/different than those focused on earning LA credit.

ATTENDANCE: For each 0.5 credit, students can miss up to six classes (excused or unexcused) until they need to complete projects to make up for the lost hours not in class. For each 0.5 credit, if students don’t make up this time they are only eligible for a maximum of 0.25 credit until they do.

Meesh Indies
Michelle Vecchio, 2nd Semester 2018-19

None assigned

Students will complete independent studies in either Language Arts or Social Studies.

For Language Arts, students will complete book projects after reading novels or short stories.
When reading novels, students will read 8 novels (or 4 novels if modified) and complete 8 book projects
When reading short stories, students will read 12 short stories (or 8 short stories if modified) and complete 8-12 book projects

For Social Studies, students will explore history (World or U.S), complete independent research projects and inquiry-based studies, and present finding in writing or orally.

The Body Remembers
Adam Croft, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Room 202 : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

None assigned

This course will be taught by: Julene Pommert

in room, 202, Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

Social Studies Elective /0.5 credits

YOU WILL HAVE TO GET A CONSENT FORM SIGNED BY YOU AND YOUR PARENT/GUARDIAN TO SIGN-UP FOR THIS CLASS. YOU CAN OBTAIN THIS FROM ADAM. AGAIN, I WILL NOT ALLOW YOU TO SIGN-UP FOR THIS CLASS WITHOUT A COMPLETED CONSENT FORM.

This is a class that combines psycho-education of how trauma has informed both social history and your history. This is also a class that incorporates experiential practices of self-care and other-care. Warning: The readings include examples of extreme violence.

We will read and discuss two books, Resmaa Menakem’s My Grandmother’s Hands and Dr. Nadine Harris’ The Deepest Well. Students will be expected to keep and post journal entries and questions regarding the readings, and toward the end of class develop either individually or jointly a class project that shows understanding and reflective responses to readings. There will be audios of readings for those who need them. Approximately half of the class will involve working with our bodies to develop compassionate responses to trauma and other difficulties. Exercises will come from Menakem’s book as well as other readings and work that I have done in private practice.

You will also be required to sign a consent form regarding expectations for the class, since I have a dual relationship with NOVA students, being not only a teacher here, but also a parent of students that attend NOVA, and I am a counselor, but will not be individually counseling people of the class.

Risks: Your own trauma, or historical trauma, may be stirred up by readings and class practices/discussions.

Recommendations: Get/keep a counselor who understands trauma; Develop/maintain a support team you can call on when needed—friends, parents, spiritual mentor(s), doctor, psychiatrist.

Mathematics

Algebra 1B
Lydia Wynn, 2nd Semester 2018-19
207 - Winnie's Room : Tue/Thu 10:15-11:40

MA - Algebra 1A / 0.5

This is the second semester of Algebra I. This course is appropriate for any students who are interested in taking it, regardless of whether they feel confident in math or not. In addition to learning the fundamentals of algebra, we’ll be devoting weekly class time to developing number sense, mathematical inquiry skills, and pattern recognition. Additional support time is available outside of class for students who would like additional help or more advanced challenges.

This class will cover 3 major areas:
1. Linear Equations
2. Exponential Functions
3. Basic Quadratics

In addition to the mathematics content, students are expected to

  • listen with respect to another person’s explanation;
  • provide help when asked;
  • ask for help when needed;
  • play an active role in sustaining a safe and encouraging learning space for one another; and
  • treat all materials gently so that they may be reused.
  • Participate and attend classes regularly, frequent absences will result in a required

Algebra 1B Tue/Thur 8:45am
Lance Brown, 2nd Semester 2018-19
B19 Lance's Room : Tue/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

MA - Algebra 1B / 0.5

This is the first semester of Algebra I. This course is appropriate for any students who are interested in taking it, regardless of whether they feel confident in math or not. In addition to learning the fundamentals of algebra, we’ll be devoting weekly class time to developing number sense, mathematical inquiry skills, and pattern recognition. Additional support time is available outside of class for students who would like additional help or more advanced challenges.

This class will cover 5 areas:
1. Numbers and Properties
2. Variables and Equations
3. Intro to Functions
4. Linear Functions
5. Linear Functions, Part II

In addition to the mathematics content, students are expected to

  • listen with respect to another person’s explanation;
  • provide help when asked;
  • ask for help when needed;
  • play an active role in sustaining a safe and encouraging learning space for one another; and
  • treat all materials gently so that they may be reused.

Algebra 2B 10:15
Lydia Wynn, 2nd Semester 2018-19
207 - Winnie's Room : Mon/Wed 8:45-10:10

MA - Algebra 2A / 0.5; MA - Algebra 2A H / 0.5

Algebra 2 is a stepping stone in the general sequence of mathematics classes. To be taken after Algebra 1 and Geometry, Algebra 2 begins to explore the deeper patterns found in functions and other representations of relationships. Algebra 2 is really about forming solid connections between the Algebra 1 work, Geometry work, and the world around you. Our first goal will be to build up confidence in working with problem solving, mathematical modelling, and function analysis and recognition. Then we will move in to an introductory exploration of probability and statistics, systems of equations in 3-variables, and trigonometry.

Algebra 2B 8:45
Lydia Wynn, 2nd Semester 2018-19
207 - Winnie's Room : Mon/Wed 8:45-10:10

MA - Algebra 2A / 0.5; MA - Algebra 2A H / 0.5

Algebra 2 is a stepping stone in the general sequence of mathematics classes. To be taken after Algebra 1 and Geometry, Algebra 2 begins to explore the deeper patterns found in functions and other representations of relationships. Algebra 2 is really about forming solid connections between the Algebra 1 work, Geometry work, and the world around you. Our first goal will be to build up confidence in working with problem solving, mathematical modelling, and function analysis and recognition. Then we will move in to an introductory exploration of probability and statistics, systems of equations in 3-variables, and trigonometry.

Build
Akil Srinivasan, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Moon 120 - The Laboratory : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

MA - Applied Math 2A / 0.5

This is a class for people who love to use their hands, who learn best by doing, who like using tools with care. Are you curious about how to use geometry to design and build things? If so, this may be the class for you. We will be using power tools and electronic prototyping tools. The main focus will be on using geometry to drive the projects you’ll be making.

I have planned this class to be an extension of the formal Geometry you have learned, so you need to have taken Geo A and Geo B to be eligible, though you do not need to have earned full credit. This class can be a great way to make up any partial credits in Geometry A or Geometry B.

Calculus B
Michael Hodapp, 2nd Semester 2018-19
105 : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

MA - Calculus B / 0.5

This is the second of two semesters of Calculus. This course is appropriate for any student interested in taking it, but they must have taken precalculus and Calculus A. It is a course in differential and integral calculus. We will focus on both theory (rigorous proofs) and applications. We will treat it as a seminar and learn through textbook readings, discussion, and interesting problems posed by both the facilitator and students. Calculus applications are found everywhere, including physics, chemistry, biology, engineering, economics, and practically anything having to do with “change” in the world!

If there is interest and dedication, we can also spend some time preparing for the AP exam to get college credit.

Possible topics include (but can be changed depending on student interest):

  • Functions and graphs
  • Rigorous development of limits (including epsilon-delta theory)
  • Continuity
  • Derivatives and Differentiability
  • Many applications of differential calculus
  • Curve sketching
  • Related rates (simple differential equations)
  • Implicit differentiation
  • Parametric equations
  • Polar functions
  • Vector functions
  • l’Hopital’s rule
  • Riemann sums
  • Indefinite and definite integrals
  • Applications of integration
  • Fundamental theorem of Calculus
  • Numerical approximations to integrals
  • Sequences and series, including convergence and divergence

There will be on the order of 2 hours of homework/studying per week. Be prepared to practice your math skills and collaborate on projects. We will also follow the 8 absence attendance policy, which will help keep you on top of things in this class.

“Math Support” time is available during lunch on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays for any student who would like additional help or more advanced challenges.

In addition to the mathematics content, students are expected to

  • Listen with respect to another person’s explanation
  • Engage in discussion
  • Communicate ideas both informally and formally
  • Provide help when asked
  • Ask for help when needed;
  • Play an active role in sustaining a safe and encouraging learning space for one another

COE Bootcamp
Michelle Vecchio, 2nd Semester 2018-19

None assigned

This course is for SENIORS who have not passed the State’s Math SBAC exam and are planning on graduating this June. This is for graduating seniors that need to sit for the SBAC re-take in March/April. If you pass, you’ll be done with the class! If not, we have the rest of the semester to do the collection of evidence (COE) process below. This course is designed to replace a regular math class in the student’s schedule and qualifies as a third math credit.

Students will work toward completing a collection of evidence (COE) that consists of 6-8 state designed algebra I tasks. Practice tasks will be used to help students prepare and review algebra I skills throughout the semester. The COE will be submitted to the state toward the end of the semester and the state will determine if competency is demonstrated. A successful COE will satisfy the mandatory passing of a math SBAC for graduation.

Financial Algebra Tues/Thur 10:15am
Lance Brown, 2nd Semester 2018-19
B19 Lance's Room : Tue/Thu 8:45-10:10

MA - Financial Algebra 2 / 0.5

In this class we will alternate between the personal and the general. We will learn the everyday skills adults need to establish a budget, bank, save and borrow money, and pay local and national taxes. At the same time, we will be exploring the finances of the country. Just as we look at our own budgets, we will explore the topic of balancing the federal budget and learn about the issues that surround the federal deficit. As we explore the distinction between “wants” and “needs” in our own budgets, we will examine the choices our own country makes in its military spending. As we explore the way taxes are taken out of paychecks (FICA) we will look at the structure and sustainability of Social Security and Medicare. We will explore income tax models comparing fixed-amount taxation to flat/proportional taxes, to the progressive tax model.

5 Essential questions we will research and review throughout the 2nd semester are the following;

1. How is money created in the United States?

2. What is the Federal Reserve? Does the Federal Government own the Federal Reserve? If not, who does?

3. What gives the U.S. currency value? Was it always this way?

4. When and how was the I.R.S. created?

5. What is the Function of a Central Bank?

Geometry B Mon/Wed 12:20-1:45
Lance Brown, 2nd Semester 2018-19
B#19 : Mon/Wed 12:20-13:45

MA - Geometry B / 0.5

Geometry B Mon/Wed 8:45-10:10am
Lance Brown, 2nd Semester 2018-19
B#19 : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

MA - Geometry B / 0.5

Infernal Casino
Michael Hodapp, 2nd Semester 2018-19
105 : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:20-13:45

MA - Probability & Statistics A / 0.5

Are you a game geek? When we play games, we’re constantly doing math. We observe patterns, create and test strategies, and try to increase our chances of winning, whether we’re playing with or against others. This class will use games and puzzles to explore inductive and deductive logic, probability, combinatorics, and basic game theory. We’ll spend a lot of time playing games as a way to learn about and apply mathematical thinking. Because some games take longer than others, I’ll also expect you to play games outside of class.

Work in this class will consist of 4-5 portfolios that encompass the following mathematical topics:
1. Inductive Logic, Deductive Logic, and Symbolic Logic Notation
2. Independent Probability
3. Dependent Probability
4. Expected value, payoff, and strategic decision making
5. Combinatorics and Probability using Combinatorics

In addition, students interested in working towards honors credit will demonstrate competencies such as binomial probability distribution, the probability mass function, and a written analysis of a the randomized elements of a strategic game.

In the process of completing these portfolios, students can expect to complete journal entries, game reports and reflections, written and online math assignments, and a final small group project in which students design an original game and analyze the logic, strategies, and psychology of it. We’ll teach these original games to the Nova community towards the end of the semester.

Pre Calculus "B"
Lydia Wynn, 2nd Semester 2018-19
207 - Winnie's Room : Tue/Thu 12:20-13:45

MA - Pre-Calculus A / 0.5; MA - Pre-Calculus A H / 0.5

Pre Calculus Learning Objectives

A chance to take mathematics to a whole new level. Using prior mathematics learning (Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2) as a foundation, we are going to explore how math can apply to your world with an introductory Calculus lens. From working with functions as a descriptor of relationships and change, to developing connections between triangles, circles, and functions (trigonometry). We will open our minds to the language that is used to describe the patterns of the world and strengthen your comfort towards working with mathematical notation, graphical representation, and manipulation.

Experience in Algebra 1, Geometry, and Algebra 2 is highly encouraged as they represent the foundation of what we do in Pre Calculus. Complete mastery is not necessary, however genuine effort and honest question asking are welcomed! Please come to class with an open mind about where mathematics can take you in the world.

Physical Education

3-Way Soccer
Stefan Gruber, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Gruber's Lab, The Dead Rat Field : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

PE - Individual/Dual Activity 1 / 0.5

3-Way soccer!
This is an unorthodox sports workshop. We sit down at the end of each game to talk about what rules we want to add and subtract to a constantly changing sport. 12 years of fine tuning in this way has produced a game that uses 3 teams on a circular field and a huge yoga ball that you dribble on the grass with your fist, or kick. It feels a bit like a bizarre circus act crossed with a blend of many familiar sports aspects. Meet at Stefan’s room to keep your bag safe, then we head over to the Dead Rat Field.

Bombardment Society
The Dark Knight Batman, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Garfield Community Center : Thu 13:50-14:30

PE - Individual/Dual Activity 1 / 0.25

This class can be Individual/Dual Activity 1.

Students will develop eye hand coordination and learn teamwork through the age old game of dodge ball.

Disc Sports
Adam Croft, 2nd Semester 2018-19
room 202 and beyond : Wed 13:50-14:30

None assigned

learn and play various games that involve discs, including ultimate frisbee

Don't Trip
Julia Reade, 1st Semester 2018-19
Vida Room 208

PE - Individual/Dual Activity 1 / 0.15

Walking is a great way to de-stress, bring oxygen to your brain and engage in the neighborhood. Students will democratically choose the direction we wander, and leave their phones behind for an experience in the present moment. We’ll bookend our walks with simple gentle stretches.

PE PE
Julia Reade, 1st Semester 2018-19
Julia's Room 208 : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

PE - Lifetime Activities 1 / 0.5

Why PE? I can promise you it’s about so much more than merely getting the credits to graduate. There are so many wonderful benefits to being active—stress relief, meeting new people, and just plain old feeling awesome! Together, we will explore creative and traditional activities, starting with their histories and centering stories of marginalized people and groups who participate in the sport. In addition to actively participating in the focus activity, we will brainstorm ways to conduct community outreach in an effort to engage others in more physical activity. Be ready to try a variety of activities from hacky sack to strength circuits to hiking. No previous experience in any sport is required, just an open mind and willingness to try.

Science

Advanced Chemistry
Eyva Winet, 2nd Semester 2018-19
RM #120 : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:15-11:40

SC - Chemistry 2 H / 0.5

This is advanced chemistry and is open only to students who have completed at least .5 Chemistry credit. Students who want to do Chemistry 2, 3, 4, honors or AP Chemistry are invited to participate. This class will have a smaller total number of students to accommodate the variety of levels and interests and the expectation is that students will be willing to work in small groups with other students with similar backgrounds, interests and goals.

This course is an experiential journey through the essential themes, concepts, models, laboratory skills, mathematics and thinking processes that characterize a molecular understanding of the world. This class emphasizes creating a context for chemistry by understanding the history, philosophy, multi-ethnic perspectives, ethics, applications and relevance of chemistry. Chemistry is a study of the atomic theory, the structure of matter, bonding, nuclear chemistry, fuel chemistry, the periodic table, stoichiometry, reaction chemistry, equilibrium, kinetics, oxidation-reduction chemistry and more. These reactions and concepts explain and control the environment, product manufacturing, the human body, scientific arts like photography and ceramics, food, fermentation and combustion! Expect labs, color changes, burning stuff, and fun! We will also discuss pressing chemical issues and chemical ethics. There is math and writing in this course so get ready to use your whole brain!

Advanced Physics
Akil Srinivasan, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Moon 120 - The Laboratory : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:20-13:45

SC - Physics ADV 3 / 0.5

Physics Prerequisite: You must have taken and gotten full or close credit in both semesters of Physics A and Physics B (Physics 1 and 2 on your transcript). Physics Intensive for a semester works too.
Math Prerequisite: You must have taken 2.5 years of core math classes through Algebra 2A and gotten close to full credit. You should be concurrently enrolled in Algebra 2B or higher.
If you don’t meet the physics or math prerequisite, then you and your coordinator need to check in with Akil before enrolling.
Credit note: This is for Physics 3 credit.

In this class, there will be math, labs, research projects and physics seminars. If you hate these things this is not the class for you. If you like theories of the universe, questions of reality and perception, energy, movement, matter and MATH, then this is the class for you. We will be exploring fundamental classical theories in energy, circular motion, thermodynamics, and electromagnetism. You will be required to do a culminating lab research project and presentation during the last month of the semester

Bio-Geo Ethics
Adam Croft, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Room 202 and beyond : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

SC - Science Seminar / 0.5

Students will explore and debate the ethical dimensions of contemporary scientific practice/application within the biological and Earth sciences. In addition to developing an understanding of ethical decision-making in general, students will explore the scientific and historical aspects of various “advances” associated with biology and Earth science, including: geo-engineering, genetic modification, cloning, disaster preparation and response, and other topics volunteered by students and those arising within current events.

Questions to be addressed by students participating in this course likely include:
- how can we use ethical thinking to make decisions within science and society?
- what role does scientific understanding play in making ethical decisions?
- how do social justice needs intersect with ethical decision-making?
- how can we identify ethically challenging scientific practices and applications?

Biology
Susan Barth, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Susan's RM 3 : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

SC - Biology A / 0.5


This is not an introductory class. You are expected to enter it with a basic knowledge of Cell Biology, which we will expand on. If you haven’t already learned some topics in Life Science lab skills, cell structures and genetics, then please take Life is Funny this semester and Biology next fall.

This class has a base in cell Biology and will cover the fundamentals of the cell. This class will include, inquiry based science, research, modeling of systems and creating projects. Will will discuss cell process including, Osmosis, Photosynthesis, DNA, Protein Synthesis and genetics. You will hone your experimental skills, work with scientific equipment, explore inquiry questions, create experiments to further your learning and expand your mind. There will be terminology to learn and apply. As a Biologist, you will share your work with your peers and beyond.

There will be a minimum of 2 hours of homework/studying per week. Some study sessions will be offered each month to help you keep on track if you want to use them. Be prepared to practice your study skills or build them if that is new to you. You will be expected to learn and apply study techniques.

This class will be offered for Biological Science credit.

Attendance: This class will follow the 8 absence attendance policy, although you should plan to attend class regularly, which will help keep you on top of things in this class.

Expectations _ You will be expected to show up and contribute to this class. This class will help you prepare for the SBAC

Climate Justice Action
Adam Croft, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Room 202 and beyond : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:20-13:45

SC - Science Seminar / 0.5

In this course, we will learn how best to, and then put into place, actions that address climate injustice.

Our inquiry into climate justice will be consistently framed within the context of the continuing historical dynamics of settler-colonialism.

In particular, we will seek to understand and create an ethic of climate justice grounded within scientific and historical understanding. Students will leave the course with a set of questions and understandings to help guide future relations between people and place.

Questions to be addressed by students participating in this course include:
- what actions can I take to make a difference?
- what actions are others taking?
- who is most vulnerable to climate change and related environmental challenges?
- how did these people come to be so vulnerable?
- what is the responsibility of wealthy nations toward poorer nations?
- what could climate justice look like?
- what is my role in enacting climate justice?
- what is the state of the planet and its life today?
- how is health/pollution distributed across the planet today and in this place?
- how has the climate crisis come about?
- how are/will these changes affect(ing) communities differently depending upon race, class, gender, age, sexuality, ability, etc.?
- how are/will these changes affect(ing) plants, animals, ecosystems, oceans, and the living planet (Gaia)?
- what does environmental justice look like in this and other places?
- what does a healthy human civilization living with and upon a healthy planet look like, in this and other places?

Earthology
Adam Croft, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Room 202 and beyond : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

SC - Earth Science / 0.5

Students will explore the science and history of the living Earth. In particular, we will pursue an understanding of Gaia Theory as developed by James Lovelock, Lynn Margulis, and other scientists. Students will be expected to develop a broad understanding of the dynamics of the living Earth while also taking on an inquiry and teaching project exploring a particular aspect of Gaia.

Scope and sequence:

I. What is happening here on Earth? How do we find answers to this question? [observe, research, experiment, model]
a. Explore current status of:
i. Lithosphere: rocks, soils, tectonic plates, volcanoes, earthquakes, etc.;
ii. Hydrosphere: oceans (acidification, over-fishing, sea-level rise), fresh water (rivers, lakes);
iii. Cryosphere: ice caps, ocean ice, glaciers, mountain snow/ice;
iv. Atmosphere: carbon dioxide, pollution (sulfur, nitrogen, particulates, etc.), temperature ;
v. Biosphere : habitat destruction, deforestation, mass extinction, invasive species, etc.
b. Project: model an Earth system and how it is changing.

II. How did it get to be this way? How did it used to be? [research, experiment, design]
a. Explore history and dynamics of each Gaia-sphere
b. Project: design a life-supporting planet fundamentally different than the Earth.

III. How could it be again? What can we do as responsible participants in the Earth? How can social justice (ie. Black Lives Matter, NoDAPL Water Protectors, Occupy, etc.) interconnect with Earth justice?
a. Research and discuss key questions related to application of Earth knowledge in conjunction with social justice
b. Project: action-research project linking social and Earth justice.

IV. Final portfolio:
a. Guiding questions:
i. What have you accomplished?
ii. What have you learned?
iii. What are you still pondering?
iv. What are you still struggling over?
v. What will you take with you from this experience?
b. Portfolio:
i. Collected works from the semester
ii. Written reflection on above questions

Intro to Life Science/Life is Funny
Susan Barth, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Room #B3 : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

SC - Life Science 1 / 0.5


This is an introductory Life Science class. If you already have experimental/lab skills and knowledge in topics like DNA, photosynthesis and genetics, then please take Biology.

This class is for people who like living things, but have not had a lot of experience with studying them. We will be doing experiments in biological topics, learning to ask scientific questions, create experiments, collect data and complete lab reports. We will use microscopes, balances and other lab equipment. We will study different parts of Biology, plants, animals, fungus, and their relationships in nature. Explore citizen science projects (Citizen science projects can earn service learning credit), research scientists and current events. Ever wonder what’s in pond water or how forests rely on fungus to survive? Let’s find out. This class will be great for those who are science shy or inexperienced. This is a great prerequisite for Biology, unless you can show that you have some solid experience in these areas to your coordinator.

Allison is involved for evaluation of curriculum for students who need modifications.

Life on Earth
Adam Croft, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Room 202 and beyond : Tue/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

SC - Biology B / 0.5

Students will explore the science and history of life on Earth. Students will be expected to develop a broad understanding of the dynamics of life on Earth while also taking on an inquiry and teaching project exploring a particular aspect of Earth’s life. This course will also prepare students for half of the Biology EOC competencies.

Scope and sequence:

I. What is life? How do we answer such a question? [research, classify, design]
a. Zones of exploration
i. Definition of life;
ii. Requirements for life;
iii. Classification of life.
b. Project: Design a viable creature.

II. How do organisms live together? How do we study these interactions? [research, observe, design, experiment]
a. Zones of exploration
i. Ecological relations;
ii. Human-induced changes.
b. Project: Design and conduct a field study.

III. How do organisms change over time? How do we know? [research, scheme]
a. Zones of exploration
i. Evolution by natural selection;
ii. Examples of evolution;
iii. Human evolution.
b. Project: Plausible evolution of creature.

IV. Biology EOC: practice and review

V. Final portfolio:
a. Guiding questions:
i. What have you accomplished?
ii. What have you learned?
iii. What are you still pondering?
iv. What are you still struggling over?
v. What will you take with you from this experience?
b. Portfolio:
i. Collected works from the semester
ii. Written reflection on above questions

Marine Ecology
Susan Barth, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Room B3 : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

SC - Marine Science 1 / 0.5

This class will be co-taught with Owen Grossman. He is an avid diver in the Puget Sound.

We will focus on marine life and the environments they live in. We will be learning about specific organisms and how they work, gather food, evolve, survive harsh conditions, and the types of symbiotic relationships they form. There will be an anatomy and physiology portion in each ecosystem we learn about. We may dissect some organisms (not mandatory). We will use Inquiry to discover things about marine life and the ocean, create explorations and put our learning to use. We will explore how scientists create studies to investigate the marine environment.

Conservation will be a focus in this class, looking at what is happening in our oceans and figuring out what we can do about it. We will look at water and it’s life from a social justice stance, how are people and organisms affected by the greed of others? You will be expected to participate in conservation actions this semester (Service Learning hours will be available).

WE’RE GOING ON A BOAT!!!!! We will take our 3rd annual trip out into the Puget Sound. We will do excellent science stuff, touch critters and learn about our marine environment.

This class will be a .5 Marine Science credit. It is a good option for the EOC in conjunction with Biology to equal your full year.

Mycology
Michael Hodapp, 1st Semester 2018-19
105

SC - Science Seminar / 0.25

In this class, students will learn about the morphology, ecology, and classifications of mushrooms. Students will practice skills related to observation and documentation in the field. They’ll participate in events help by the Puget Sound Mycological Society and go on numerous self-directed field experiences.

Projects in Physical Science (Freshfolk Priority)
Akil Srinivasan, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Moon 120 - The Laboratory : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

SC - Physical Science 1 / 0.5

This class is Freshfolk Priority This is a class for students who might be “science shy” and want to learn basic skills in scientific inquiry, and have very little background in physical science. If you want to build, smash, fly, or mix things, this would be great class to build foundations and later take Chemistry and Physics! We’ll have some problem sets, lectures, discussions, and readings.

But mainly, projects, projects, projects. We will learn skills to propose, design, source, implement, and iterate physical science experiments. You will be required to keep a lab notebook to record your process, and Akil will give feedback that you’ll use to revise.

Capped at 25 spots to make sure everyone gets the coaching they need.

Social Justice Community

Mothership - Tuesday and Thursday
Michelle Vecchio, 2nd Semester 2018-19
104 : Tue/Thu 13:50-14:30

SS - Student Government / 0.15

Students will participate in Mothership, the Nova student governing body.

Students will engage in civic participation and discussion.

Students will represent their coors.

Mothership - Tuesday ONLY
Michelle Vecchio, 2nd Semester 2018-19
104 : Tue 13:50-14:30

None assigned

Students will participate in Mothership, the Nova student governing body.

Students will engage in civic participation and discussion.

Students will represent their coors.

Social Studies

AGE
Melissa Park, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Melissa's room, Moon 101 : Tue/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

SS - American Government & Economics / 0.5

NO CELL PHONES ARE ALLOWED IN THE CLASS. HAVE YOUR CELL PHONE OUT IN CLASS AND YOU’LL BE MARKED ABSENT. And I am NOT cool with earbuds in people’s ears during class—seriously. ATTENDANCE: Rack up more than 6 absences (excused or unexcused), and your maximum credit drops to 0.25 until you make up for the competencies/lost hours not in class.

AGE (American Government & Economics) is a one-semester class for juniors and seniors, and is required of all students for graduation. In it, we work to build “toolkits” for understanding how we effect, and are affected by, public policies and systems in American society, both historically and currently.

We’ll examine the most pressing social issues affecting our communities, and work to understand, examine, and critique the structures of power in this country, with focus on what/who has power to change and/or perpetuate systemic harm. We’ll role-play, debate, make art, use music, math, and more to question, analyze, and build informed perspectives on history and current events affecting your life.

Students will learn how to write, research for, and complete a CBA (a short paper examining a public issue) that is a state requirement for graduation. ALSO: through this class, interested seniors may complete their culminating social justice inquiry project as part of the pilot grad requirement we are implementing this year.

EXPECT TO COMPLETE HOMEWORK OUTSIDE OF CLASS EVERY WEEK TO BE ON-TRACK FOR FULL CREDIT.

AGE American Government and Economics / U.S. History
Brian Aytch, 2nd Semester 2018-19
RM# 122 : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

IEP - American Government & Economics M / 0.5

Does capitalism or government propel the United States of American? The short answer is both but more importantly the answer is complex. And then there is the U.S. Constitution which supposedly sets a foundation for the American experiment. In this AGE course we will weave a tapestry to show each is somewhat depended on the other. The constitution will be our initial guide to understanding America, it will also serve as the foundation for the CBA (classroom based assessment) which is our culminating project in this course. The CBA is a major graduation requirement. The marriage of economics and government will be explored by studying the stock market, politics, current events and history. Students will also learn about vital macroeconomic concepts that drive the U.S. Economy.

Colors of Satire
Brian Aytch, 2nd Semester 2018-19
RM# 122

None assigned

Hip-Hop Studies
Melissa Park, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Melissa's room, Moon #101 : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:15-11:40

SS - World History 2 / 0.5

NO CELL PHONES ARE ALLOWED IN THE CLASS. HAVE YOUR CELL PHONE OUT IN CLASS AND YOU’LL BE MARKED ABSENT. And I am NOT cool with earbuds in people’s ears during class—seriously. ATTENDANCE: Rack up more than 6 absences (excused or unexcused), and your maximum credit drops to 0.25 until you make up for the competencies/lost hours not in class.

Hip-Hop Studies is a class open to anyone interested in learning more about the origins and evolution of how hip-hop has changed the world. Expect to participate…in cyphers of discussion, show & tell, making art, making space for all voices, deep listening, and building a creative community of learners and makers. There is zero room for passive observers in this class. Expect to regularly read/listen and respond in writing & discussion to a variety of lyrics, poetry, historical narratives, non-fiction writings, visual art, films, and music. EXPECT TO DO CLASSWORK ON YOUR OWN TIME, i.e. OUTSIDE OF CLASS, IN ORDER TO EARN CREDIT. This is a world history class that is also an Ethnic Studies course.

We will focus largely on the innovative and revolutionary aspects of hip-hop, looking at the movements and politics that inspired its birth as a form of art, music, and activism. Students will ask questions of how hip-hop speaks to youth, and speaks about oppression, violence, identity, culture, and power. We’ll explore hip-hop as a form of cultural politics and activism toward social justice. Students will create hip-hop inspired art, music, and activist projects. Tentatively, we will also welcome guest speakers in to teach workshops on beat-making, writing, graffiti art, dance, and community organizing.

Independents
Brian Aytch, 2nd Semester 2018-19
room 122 : Thu 8:45-10:10

None assigned

Independents for world History

Inventing America
Michael Hodapp, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Room 105 : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:15-11:40

SS - US History 11A / 0.5

In Inventing America, we’ll explore early U.S. history, from the arrival of Columbus through the Civil War. In studying this time period, we’ll constantly question everything about what it means to be American. We’ll critically examine the story about where our country came from by examining art, children’s books, movies, and political propaganda. We’ll compare the real history with some of the national myths that we’ve created. We’ll study topics that rarely make it into high school history texts, including colonialism in the Americas, an early history of gender and sexuality, the legacy of class struggles in the United States, and the creation of the concept of race. We’ll engage with complex history using role plays, class debates, research projects, and art.

This history class will not focus on memorizing names, dates, and places. Instead, this class will challenge students to think critically about U.S. history and to identify historical trends and tensions within U.S. society. By the end of the semester, students should be able to construct a cohesive narrative that connects current events to earlier U.S. history, including to our founding documents.

Macro world History
Brian Aytch, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Rm #122 : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:20-13:45

WHist / 0.5

The world economy is a complex integration of mechanism that influences such phenomenon as wages, goods & production, trade and diplomacy. Students will learn about influence on our world economy from the perspectives of nations, corporations and communities. . Students will also learn about impact of world economies on specific ethnic groups, women/families, environment (climate change) and technology. There is a substantial social justice (ethnic studies/gender) emphasis in this course. Furthermore students will learn about major macroeconomic concepts. These concepts are tools economist use to analyze economies and political systems. Some of the concepts studied include, supply/demand theory, unemployment measurements, trade/tariffs, taxes, supply chains, population pyramids, market economy (capitalism) vs central planned economies (socialism), etc.

Micro World History
Brian Aytch, 2nd Semester 2018-19
rm #122 : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:15-11:40

WHist / 0.5

This is a general education course open to all students.

This class is very similar to Macro World History course except in Micro World we examine our world economy/history through the lens of individuals and small communities not sovereign nation states or major corporations.
The world economy is a complex integration of mechanism that influences such phenomenon as wages, goods & production, trade and diplomacy. Students will learn about influence on our world economy from the perspectives of individual, small bushiness and local communities. Students will also learn about impact of world economies on specific ethnic groups, women/families, environment (climate change) and technology through the lens of individuals and small communities. . There is a substantial social justice (ethnic studies/gender) emphasis in this course. Furthermore students will learn about major macroeconomic concepts. These concepts are tools economist use to analyze economies and political systems. Some of the concepts studied include, supply/demand theory, unemployment measurements, trade/tariffs, taxes, supply chains, population pyramids, market economy (capitalism) vs central planned economies (socialism), etc.

Queer History
Melissa Park, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Melissa's room / Rm 101 : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

SS - World History 2 / 0.5

NO CELL PHONES ARE ALLOWED IN THE CLASS. HAVE YOUR CELL PHONE OUT IN CLASS AND YOU’LL BE MARKED ABSENT. And I am NOT cool with earbuds in people’s ears during class—seriously. ATTENDANCE: Rack up more than 6 absences (excused or unexcused), and your maximum credit drops to 0.25 until you make up for the competencies/lost hours not in class.

Queer History is a world history class that seeks to learn more about how queer, gay, non-binary, transgender, and gender nonconforming people in different eras and cultures around the world have lived and shaped their societies since ancient times through present day. How and why was the the nature of heterosexuality constructed? How did the ancients think of human sexuality and same-sex relations? How old is “drag” in the scheme of human history—and why did people do it? What were the reasons cross-dressing was outlawed in writing in the Old Testament? Why was Joan of Arc’s “drag” so threatening to the power structures of her day? Why and how did the “gay capitals” we know today in different countries emerge? What are the origin stories of “gay rights” movements in countries around the world? How are the experiences of queer people of color similar and different to those of queer white folks, now and in the past?

Major class themes may include: identity, power & oppression, resistance & liberation, and reflection & action. EXPECT TO DO CLASSWORK ON YOUR OWN TIME, i.e. OUTSIDE OF CLASS, IN ORDER TO EARN CREDIT. (This description will be updated asap to include more detailed information.)

Washington State History
Adam Croft, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Schoology and the city

SS - WA State History (Credit Bearing) / 0.25

Students will explore the history of the state of Washington through the following topical strands:
- Social justice;
- Oral histories;
- First nations;
- Civics and government structures;
- Geography;
- Earth and ecological history and dynamics;
- Economics.

• The class awards 0.25 WA State History credit. This counts as elective credit and fulfills the WA State History graduation requirement.
• There will be a 30 minute in-person orientation that every student must attend to be enrolled. We’ve got two options for that: Thursday, February 18th and Friday, February 19th. On both days, the orientation will happen at 2:30 in the computer lab. If students register for the class later in the semester, they’ll organize a one-on-one orientation with me or Adam.
• The class will be run entirely through Schoology, with all assignments posted there and turned in there.
• The class will require students to travel places around town (such as neighborhoods, parks, and museums) to complete some assignments.
• Students will be required to complete an online check-in at a minimum each week. This online check-in is our equivalent of attendance.
• Students are encouraged to collaborate and complete assignments together, but can also do them solo if they’d like.

Whistleblowers and Muckrakers
Michael Hodapp, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Room 105 : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

SS - US History 11B / 0.5

This class will study United States History since the late 19th Century through the lens of whistleblowers, investigative journalists, and activists who exposed corrupt or unjust systems and fought to change them. During the course of the semester, we’ll cover industrialization, labor rights movements, the Civil Rights era, Vietnam, and current events such as the NSA and the Hanford Nuclear cleanup. We’ll approach history as a contested subject, one in which a multitude of stories from different perspectives must be weighed and considered as we search for larger trends and truths in U.S. society. Examining history through a lens of race, class, gender, and power, we’ll constantly ask whether the common stories we tell in U.S. history might be biased. If so, what purposes do they serve? And how can we wrap our heads around events and time periods that looked radically different to different people in the United States?

Rather than focusing on memorizing names, dates, and places, this class will challenge students to think critically about U.S. history and to identify historical trends and tensions within U.S. society. By the end of the semester, students should be able to construct a cohesive narrative that connects current events to earlier U.S. history.

Technology

Tech Committee
Michael Hodapp, 2nd Semester 2018-19
Computer Lab : Tue 13:50-14:30

SS - Student Government / 0.13

Tech Committee is tasked with the following responsibilities at Nova:

- Maintain the laptop carts and computer lab resources
- Work with the district to ensure that issues with computers and other tech resources (overhead projectors, document projects, etc) are diagnosed and fixed
- Increase the technological literacy of the Nova community
- Ensure equitable access to technology within the Nova community
- Train committee members in understanding computer hardware, software, and networking

World Languages

Contributing to the World Languages Program outside the class time
Lydia Condrea, 2nd Semester 2018-19
various rooms at Nova : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

Service Learning -0- CREDIT / 0

Acquire and apply understanding of language acquisition/learning process by preparing, organizing, and conducting a workshop in the language they are studying and in which they demonstrated competencies themselves;

French Studies
Lydia Condrea, 2nd Semester 2018-19
RM #204 : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

WL - French 1A / 0.5; WL - French 1B / 0.5

All world language classes will start with a week of introduction to Language Acquisition, taught in English. The goal of this part of the course is to provide students with understanding of language acquisition/learning process and to empower them in their endeavor of mastering a new language by making them aware about most effective strategies to be used for reaching that purpose. Afterwards, participants will explore different aspects of French culture, learning linguistic pattern, and applying them in various situations. The instruction is in French. Teaching strategies, as in all language classes at Nova, are targeting language acquisition rather than learning.
EARNING CREDIT: FULL CREDIT upon the condition of 1) PERFECT ATTENDANCE 2) HOMEWORK COMPLETED. Homework is to be completed, there is no such thing as turning the homework in, getting a grade on it or such, homework is the material with which we are working in class, students are changing whatever needs to be changed, take notes, more experienced students are contributing more, beginners observe, follow, progress. Those who do not complete the homework on a regular basis will receive partial credit, absences as well result in lost of part of the credit.
When the student feels ready to demonstrate competencies for 2B level (does not even have to take the class), they are to:
1) Take a written test; 2) Go through an interview; 3) Prepare a project in French, and present it to the class.

Demonstrating 2B or higher competencies assures for that student levels 1A, 1B, 2A, and 2B (or more for higher levels) on their transcript.

German Studies
Lydia Condrea, 2nd Semester 2018-19
RM #204 : Mon/Wed/Thu 14:35-16:00

WL - German 1 Comp NM (Novice Mid)*1.0 CR / 0.5; WL - German 2 Comp NH (Novice High)*1.0 CR / 0.5; WL - German 3 Comp IL (Interm Low)*1.0 CR / 0.5

All world language classes will start with a week of introduction to Language Acquisition, taught in English. The goal of this part of the course is to provide students with understanding of language acquisition/learning process and to empower them in their endeavor of mastering a new language by making them aware about most effective strategies to be used for reaching that purpose. Afterwards, participants will explore different aspects of German culture, learning linguistic pattern, and applying them in various situations. Teaching strategies, as in all language classes at Nova, are targeting language acquisition rather than learning.

EARNING CREDIT: FULL CREDIT upon the condition of 1) PERFECT ATTENDANCE 2) HOMEWORK COMPLETED. Homework is to be completed, there is no such thing as turning the homework in, getting a grade on it or such, homework is the material with which we are working in class, students are changing whatever needs to be changed, take notes, more experienced students are contributing more, beginners observe, follow, progress. Those who do not complete the homework on a regular basis will receive partial credit, absences as well result in lost of part of the credit.
When the student feels ready to demonstrate competencies for 2B level (does not even have to take the class), they are to:
1) Take a written test; 2) Go through an interview; 3) Prepare a project in German, and present it to the class.

Demonstrating 2B or higher competencies assures for that student levels 1A, 1B, 2A, and 2B or higher on their transcript.

Italian Studies
Lydia Condrea, 2nd Semester 2018-19
RM #204 : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:15-11:40

WL - Italian 1 Comp NM (Novice Mid)*1.0 CR / 0.5; WL - Italian 2 Comp NH (Novice High)*1.0 CR / 0.5

All world language classes will start with a week of introduction to Language Acquisition, taught in English. The goal of this part of the course is to provide students with understanding of language acquisition/learning process and to empower them in their endeavor of mastering a new language by making them aware about most effective strategies to be used for reaching that purpose. Afterwards, participants will explore different aspects of Italian culture, learning linguistic pattern, and applying them in various situations. The instruction is in Italian. Teaching strategies, as in all language classes at Nova, are targeting language acquisition rather than learning.

EARNING CREDIT: FULL CREDIT upon the condition of 1) PERFECT ATTENDANCE 2) HOMEWORK COMPLETED. Homework is to be completed, there is no such thing as turning the homework in, getting a grade on it or such, homework is the material with which we are working in class, students are changing whatever needs to be changed, take notes, more experienced students are contributing more, beginners observe, follow, progress. Those who do not complete the homework on a regular basis will receive partial credit, absences as well result in lost of part of the credit.
When the student feels ready to demonstrate competencies for 2B level (does not even have to take the class), they are to:
1) Take a written test; 2) Go through an interview; 3) Prepare a project in Italian, and present it to the class.

Demonstrating 2B or higher competencies assures for that student levels 1A, 1B, 2A, and 2B or, respectively, higher on their transcript.

Japanese Studies, intermediate
Lydia Condrea, 2nd Semester 2018-19
RM #204 : Tue/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

UE - Teacher Assistant (.25) / 0.5; WL - Japanese 1A / 0.5; WL - Japanese 2A / 0.5; WL - Japanese 3A / 0.5

All world language classes will start with a week of introduction to Language Acquisition, taught in English. The goal of this part of the course is to provide students with understanding of language acquisition/learning process and to empower them in their endeavor of mastering a new language by making them aware about most effective strategies to be used for reaching that purpose. Afterwards, participants will explore different aspects of Japanese culture, learning linguistic pattern, and applying them in various situations. This is an exploratory course, lead by students, advised and directed by Lydia. Learning strategies, as in all language classes at Nova, are targeting language acquisition rather than learning.

EARNING CREDIT: FULL CREDIT upon the condition of 1) PERFECT ATTENDANCE 2) HOMEWORK COMPLETED. Homework is to be completed, there is no such thing as turning the homework in, getting a grade on it or such, homework is the material with which we are working in class, students are changing whatever needs to be changed, take notes, more experienced students are contributing more, beginners observe, follow, progress. Those who do not complete the homework on a regular basis will receive partial credit, absences as well result in lost of part of the credit.
When the student feels ready to demonstrate competencies for 2B level (does not even have to take the class), they are to:
1) Take a written test; 2) Go through an interview; 3) Prepare a project in Japanese, and present it to the class.

Demonstrating 2B or higher competencies assures for that student levels 1A, 1B, 2A, and 2B or, respectively, higher on their transcript.

Modern Greek Studies
Lydia Condrea, 2nd Semester 2018-19
room 204 : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

WL - Greek 1 Comp NM (Novice-Mid)*1.0 CR / 0.5

All world language classes will start with a week of introduction to Language Acquisition, taught in English. The goal of this part of the course is to provide students with understanding of language acquisition/learning process and to empower them in their endeavor of mastering a new language by making them aware about most effective strategies to be used for reaching that purpose. Afterwards, participants will explore different aspects of Greek language and culture, learning linguistic pattern, and applying them in various situations. Listening activities will be prevalent, attendance is key to success. Teaching strategies, as in all language classes at Nova Project, are targeting language acquisition rather than learning.

EARNING CREDIT: FULL CREDIT upon the condition of 1) PERFECT ATTENDANCE 2) HOMEWORK COMPLETED. Homework is to be completed, there is no such thing as turning the homework in, getting a grade on it or such, homework is the material with which we are working in class, students are changing whatever needs to be changed, take notes, more experienced students are contributing more, beginners observe, follow, progress. Those who do not complete the homework on a regular basis will receive partial credit, absences as well result in lost of part of the credit.
When the student feels ready to demonstrate competencies for 2B level (does not even have to take the class), they are to:
1) Take a written test; 2) Go through an interview; 3) Prepare a project in Moderne Greek, and present it to the class.

Demonstrating 2B or higher competencies assures for that student levels 1A, 1B, 2A, and 2B or, respectively, higher on their transcript.

Russian Studies
Lydia Condrea, 2nd Semester 2018-19
room 204 : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:20-13:45

WL - Russian 1 Comp NM (Novice Mid)*1.0 CR / 0.5; WL - Russian 2 Comp NH (Novice High)*1.0 CR / 0.5; WL - Russian 3 Comp IL (Interm Low)*1.0 CR / 0.5

All world language classes will start with a week of introduction to Language Acquisition, taught in English. The goal of this part of the course is to provide students with understanding of language acquisition/learning process and to empower them in their endeavor of mastering a new language by making them aware about most effective strategies to be used for reaching that purpose. Afterwards, participants will explore different aspects of Russian culture, learning linguistic pattern, and applying them in various situations. The instruction is in Russian. Teaching strategies, as in all language classes at Nova, are targeting language acquisition rather than learning.

EARNING CREDIT: FULL CREDIT upon the condition of 1) PERFECT ATTENDANCE 2) HOMEWORK COMPLETED. Homework is to be completed, there is no such thing as turning the homework in, getting a grade on it or such, homework is the material with which we are working in class, students are changing whatever needs to be changed, take notes, more experienced students are contributing more, beginners observe, follow, progress. Those who do not complete the homework on a regular basis will receive partial credit, absences as well result in lost of part of the credit.
When the student feels ready to demonstrate competencies for 2B level (does not even have to take the class), they are to:
1) Take a written test; 2) Go through an interview; 3) Prepare a project in Russian, and present it to the class.

Demonstrating 2B or higher competencies assures for that student levels 1A, 1B, 2A, and 2B on their transcript.

Spanish Studies
Lydia Condrea, 2nd Semester 2018-19
RM #204 : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

WL - Spanish 1A / 0.5; WL - Spanish 1B / 0.5; WL - Spanish 2A / 0.5; WL - Spanish 2B / 0.5

All world language classes will start with a week of introduction to Language Acquisition, taught in English. The goal of this part of the course is to provide students with understanding of language acquisition/learning process and to empower them in their endeavor of mastering a new language by making them aware about most effective strategies to be used for reaching that purpose. Afterwards, participants will explore different aspects of Spanish culture, learning linguistic pattern, and applying them in various situations. The instruction is in Spanish. Teaching strategies, as in all language classes at Nova, are targeting language acquisition rather than learning.

EARNING CREDIT: FULL CREDIT upon the condition of 1) PERFECT ATTENDANCE 2) HOMEWORK COMPLETED. Homework is to be completed, there is no such thing as turning the homework in, getting a grade on it or such, homework is the material with which we are working in class, students are changing whatever needs to be changed, take notes, more experienced students are contributing more, beginners observe, follow, progress. Those who do not complete the homework on a regular basis will receive partial credit, absences as well result in lost of part of the credit.
When the student feels ready to demonstrate competencies for 2B level (does not even have to take the class), they are to:
1) Take a written test; 2) Go through an interview; 3) Prepare a project in Spanish, and present it to the class.

Demonstrating 2B or higher competencies assures for that student levels 1A, 1B, 2A, and 2B or, respectively, higher on their transcript.