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Career & Technical Education CTE)

Animation Induction (Level 1, 10th grade and up)
Stefan Gruber, 1st Semester 2019-20
Animation Lab 205 : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

CTE - Animation Tech Graphics 1 / 0.5

Open to all people of all levels of artistic talent from none to godly. Animation is a different art from drawing, so no drawing skills are necessary, only braveness. We’ll be exploring many techniques including 2D puppet, pixelation, flipbooks, clay. It’s a lot of fun and really good exercise for the imagination. We’ll also watch a lot of animation in here to get inspiration and meet with guest animators who make artistic animation for a living.

Career Choices and Get a Job
Jennifer Spigner, 1st Semester 2019-20
Room 114 : Tue/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

CTE - Career Choices 1 / 0.5

Are you an 9th or 10th grader?
Do you wonder about the world of the work?
Are you concerned about how to find and keep a job?
Come to this class and you will become workplace ready to look for jobs and opportunities.
I can provide assistance in your job search and college/career options.

Career Research
Identify personal skills, interests and abilities and relate them to current career choices.
Present information to class on career interests
Professional/Soft Skills/Collaborate
Resume building
Interviewing Skills
Health and Safe in the workplace

Digital Music (Beats!)
Susan Watters, 1st Semester 2019-20
Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

CTE - Recording Arts Tech 1 / 0.5

Course Description:
Students in this course will learn how to make music with Ableton Live and Push, and gain foundations in the physics and science of sound and digital audio. Concepts in this course can be translated to video, storytelling, and many types of programming, all while having fun making beats and music. Each student will have access to a digital workstations to create original music. Additionally, students will learn to record, perform, sequence, and manipulate sound.

Fashion Design
Susan Watters, 1st Semester 2019-20
221 : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

CTE - Apparel & Textiles I / 0.5

This class will be facilitated by Maria Bischof from Foundry 10.

All experience levels are welcome but be prepared to work in class, this is a “hands on” class.

We will read & create patterns, cut, serge, sew, iron.

Freshamation (Level 1, 9th grade priority)
Stefan Gruber, 1st Semester 2019-20
Animation Lab 205 : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:15-11:40

CTE - Animation Tech Graphics 1 / 0.5

This is the same offering as Animation Induction, but open to freshfolks as a priority.

Open to all people of all levels of artistic talent from none to godly. Animation is a different art from drawing, so no drawing skills are necessary, only braveness. We’ll be exploring many techniques including 2D puppet, pixelation, flipbooks, clay. It’s a lot of fun and really good exercise for the imagination. We’ll also watch a lot of animation in here to get inspiration and meet with guest animators who make artistic animation for a living.

Nova Farm
Susan Barth, 1st Semester 2019-20
Susan's Room #3 and the garden : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:20-13:45

CTE - Env Horticulture 1 / 0.5

In this class, you will experience botany, horticulture, farming, and social justice around food. You will work on the farm, cultivate crops, cook, create and carry out inquiry based experiments to support your learning, learn about environmental issues surrounding agriculture and do projects catered to your interests, including leadership, internships, and career paths. Be prepared to get dirty. This fall, we work on putting some of the garden to bed, planting hardy winter crops and landscaping, art and building. Come learn how to use power tools. Grow stuff, the bees need you.

This class can be taken for Occ. Ed. or Science, depending on what your focus is. You will need to work the details out with Susan.

This class can also earn college credit if you are prepared to meet the extra competencies.

A graduation Social Justice Project could be done in this class.

Open Animation Portal
Stefan Gruber, 1st Semester 2019-20
Room 205 : Mon/Wed/Fri 14:35-16:00

CTE - Animation Tech Graphics 2 / 0.5

Open Portal is a way to extend your projects from other animation classes into a bigger project. For instance, if you have a 300 frame animation piece and want to color it, add shadows, and textures for a more professional feel, this is the place to do that. It also doubles as a place where you can be if you want extra time working on your assignments for Comics, Games, and Animation Class.

Work Site Coordination 2019-20
Jennifer Spigner, 1st Semester 2019-20
Room 111, Jennifer's Office

CTE - Hospitality Worksite / 0.5

Work-based learning activities extend the classroom into the workplace, connecting acquired knowledge and skills to a student’s future employment. Each student’s individual learning objectives, or goals will be articulated in the first meeting among the student, their suprevisor, and the WBL coordinator(me). They will be different for each student.

I will enter these goals after the first meeting.

Yearbook
Susan Barth, 1st Semester 2019-20
Rm 3- Susan : Tue/Thu 13:50-14:30

CTE - Publishing Yearbook 1 / 0.25

Yearbook will meet both Tuesday’s and Thursday’s in Susan’s Room B03. We will fund raise with t-shirt sales, creating Nova promotional swag, photograph events and create our yearbook. We are looking for motivated, organized, creative types (you do not need to have all of those traits together). We want photographers, designers, and tech savvy folks to help us. We will capture the amazingness of our community. We also want the yearbook to be affordable for all who want it. So, we will be figuring out new and creative ways to fund raise. No experience necessary, just a strong willingness to contribute. You will learn all aspects of yearbook production regardless of your specialty. This class will be facilitated by Allison, Susan B.

The basic credit is .25 per semester, depending on the amount of work you put in.

Committee

Action Faction
Eyva Winet, 1st Semester 2019-20
Moon 120 and Trans Resource Center : Thu 13:50-14:30

SS - Student Government / 0.13

Action Faction Mission Statement:
As an all-inclusive committee, we work to create a safe and respectful community for all genders and sexualities. We combat sexuality and gender identity oppression by creating positive actions in Nova and beyond. Positive actions include maintaining safe spaces for discussions, resources and events. We believe that any social justice movement must work towards inclusion of other social justice goals. We recognize that all oppressions are connected and in no way do we want our actions to propagate other forms of oppression.
Competencies

plan and execute social justice projects that support organizations efforts to end gender and sexuality injustice
learn about power and privilege
explore the interdependence of multiple oppressions
create and execute our own projects that will work toward gender and sexuality injustices
find levity and joy in this hard work
spread sass and camp to the world

Budget Committee THUR Rm221
Lance Brown, 1st Semester 2019-20
Lance's Room 221 : Thu 13:50-14:30

SS - Student Government / 0.15

This committee is responsible for the fiscal decisions of Nova. The Friends of Nova (formerly the PTSA) raises funds for student and teacher use. It’s the role of this committee to oversee the equitable distribution of these funds. Furthermore, Nova is the only school in the District that has the privilege of designating where and how our school budget is spent. This is the forum within which those conversations and decisions are made.

The learning goals of this committee are:
1. to learn how to read and interpret a fiscal spread sheet;
2. to participate in group decision making;
3. to engage in conversations about equity and opportunity within our community;
4. to provide a space where all students and school groups feel heard and valued and where their proposals are taken seriously;
5. to explore ways to communicate our decisions and dilemmas within the Nova community;
6. to observe and participate in a formal committee structure, including a mild form of Robert’s Rules of Order;
7. and to have the experience of facilitating the running of the committee.

Button Brigade - THURS (Governing Committee)
Becky Laird, 1st Semester 2019-20
The Lab - 120 : Tue 13:50-14:30

SS - Student Government / 0.15

Button Brigade will work in collaboration with Action Faction and the rest of the Nova community to create buttons, posters, and flyers for Nova events and to help disseminate important information to the community.

Curriculum
The Dark Knight Batman, 1st Semester 2019-20
Rm 102 : Thu 13:50-14:30

SS - Student Government / 0.25

This governing committee gives students the chance to create, critique, and put into practice at Nova curriculum. Students will get the chance to work with teachers to develop both whole classes, a lesson or lessons, or a unit or units. We are hoping to work hard to create curriculum in all disciplines that de-center white narratives, explore other critical narratives that have been sorely lacking in the education of American students since the inception of this country, and are anti-racist in nature.
Want to have a voice regarding what and how you are learning? Want to maybe even work to teach something in a class, or team teach with a teacher? This is the place you can do that.
This committee is also a great place to start (at any grade level) or fully develop (as a senior) your Senior Inquiry Social Justice Project.

Debate Committe Wed Rm221
Lance Brown, 1st Semester 2019-20
Lance's Room 221 : Wed 13:50-14:30

UE - Leadership / 0.25

OUR MISSION:
Debate Committee connects, supports, and inspires a diverse community
committed to empowering students through competitive speech and debate

Dungeons and Dragons
The Dark Knight Batman, 1st Semester 2019-20
Rm 102 and 121 : Wed 13:50-14:30

UE - Student Activity / 0.25

This committee is devoted to playing the incredible role playing game – Dungeons and Dragons. Each Wednesday we will come together and play. Create a character! Run a campaign! No experience necessary at all. We will teach you how to play. Must be willing to get along with others (or be willing to learn how to), show up unless you have an incredibly good excuse, and certainly have the capacity to have fun.
Also, if you don’t have dice or source books, don’t worry about it. We have some extra you can borrow for the day.

Guild
Lydia Wynn, 1st Semester 2019-20
207 - Winnie's Room

SS - Student Government / 0.25

The purpose of guild is to promote events that strengthen the community involvement of Nova.
Students in guild will:
*Plan various events
*Support fundraisers
*Organize prom

  • Engage in the needs/desires of other Nova students.
    *Represent all student activities and interests.

Hiring and Review
Adam Croft, 1st Semester 2019-20
room 202 : Thu 13:50-14:30

SS - Student Government / 0.15

Terrance will be co-facilitating this committee!

This committee will collect feedback about teachers and coordinators at Nova and share that feedback with teachers and coordinators. We will also participating in hiring new positions and collecting information from the school about FTE needs when hiring needs to take place.

Korean Language & Culture Committee
Melissa Park, 1st Semester 2019-20
Melissa's Room / Moon 101 : Fri 13:50-14:30

UE - Student Activity / 0.15

By student request, this is a new activity committee this semester (ta-da!). Open to anyone interested in learning more about Korean language and/or culture. Expect to participate in activities centered in mini history and culture lessons, food, and games.

Sure, you may have heard of BTS or BB cream or even Bibimbap and Bulgogi, but what are you curious to learn about Korean culture, history, or language? We’ll talk about this as a committee and create a plan for what we want to do.

Here’s a brainstorm of possible questions to explore (but we certainly don’t have to go into any of these if there’s no interest in them.)
What’s up with Korean dramas—why are they so popular around the world?
Why so much eating and crying (at the same time) in Korean tv?
Why did “mukbangs” (먹방) become (and continue to be) so popular?
Why is tteokbokki (떡복기) so delicious—and can we make some during committee time?
What kinds of (offline) group games do Koreans play? (Let’s try some out!)
What’s it like to be LGBTQ in Korea?
What’s it like to be a feminist in Korea?
What are specifically Korean cultural feelings/concepts, like “Han” (한) and “Jeong” (정) about?
Why is there so much cuteness in pop culture (known as “aegyo” 애교)—that is not only embodied by young female-identified people?
Anyone interested in learning to read/write/speak/understand the Korean language? (The written alphabet is easier to learn than you might think—can be learned in less than a day.)
Are you curious about Korean children’s stories? Folk stories?
Korean etiquette? Everyday phrases/common greetings?
Hilarious Korean slang?
Manhwa/web comics?
Proverbs?
The music and/or film/tv industries in Korea?
Can we watch some cool Korean movies?
Why is there so much English in mainstream Korean culture?
What cool literature and/or other arts come out of Korea?
Why is Korea still split in two? Will it ever be unified?
What is the education system in (South) Korea like?
What are the Koreas’ relationships with their neighboring countries?
Why does the bad juju between Japan and Korea never seem to die?
What the heck is up with Kim Jong-Un & DJT?
How worried should the US be about North Korea’s weapons? What do South Koreans think of them?
Why is the former South Korean president (the one before the current person in office) sitting in jail for the next 25 years?

Come on down! We’ll figure it out together, and it will be 꿀잼 (fun) and 대박 (awesome)!!

Mothership - Thursday only
Michelle Vecchio, 1st Semester 2019-20
105 : Tue/Thu 13:50-14:30

SS - Student Government / 0.25

Students will participate in Mothership, the Nova student governing body.

Students will engage in civic participation and discussion.

Students will represent their coors.

Mothership - Tuesday and Thursday
Michelle Vecchio, 1st Semester 2019-20
105 : Tue/Thu 13:50-14:30

SS - Student Government / 0.25

Students will participate in Mothership, the Nova student governing body.

Students will engage in civic participation and discussion.

Students will represent their coors.

Peace of Mind
Akil Srinivasan, 1st Semester 2019-20
Dance Room - B01 : Fri 13:50-14:30

UE - Student Activity / 0.15

We will practice weekly formal mindfulness meditation. No experience necessary! Many studies show that daily meditation can help us deal with a host of mental health issues such as anxiety and depression and help with stress reduction as well!

Planet Nova, Friday edition
Adam Croft, 1st Semester 2019-20
Room 202 and beyond : Fri 13:50-14:30

UE - Leadership / 0.15

Let’s tend to our school’s relation to the Earth and each other, including through maintaining and strengthening our systems for composting, energy conservation, environmental justice, ecological awareness, and anything else we can do for our living community.

Planet Nova, Tuesday edition
Adam Croft, 1st Semester 2019-20
Room 202 and beyond : Tue 13:50-14:30

UE - Leadership / 0.15

Let’s tend to our school’s relation to the Earth and each other, including through maintaining and strengthening our systems for composting, energy conservation, environmental justice, ecological awareness, and anything else we can do for our living community.

POC Committee
Melissa Park, 1st Semester 2019-20
Tuesdays & Wednesdays: Melissa's room, Moon 101 : Tue/Wed 13:50-14:30

SS - Student Government / 0.15

This governing committee, the People of Color Committee (POCC), is a meeting place for students and staff who identify as people of color.

On Tuesdays we are especially focused on citizenship teaching and learning (e.g. POCC is one of several governing committees which give input to our administrators for Nova’s Mission/Vision C-SIP School Improvement Plan (an official document generated annually by Nova’s administrators that sets goals, enrichment, instructions programs, students’ achievement, and assessment of the school, and is published on our school’s SPS website).

We organize coat & warm clothing drives in the winter, field trips, pot-lucks, host movie nights, collaborate with local organizations, and program teaching events for the school. Additionally, students rotate facilitation duties of weekly committee meetings & short- and long-term projects.

On Wednesdays we meet to build community and hold space for POC students and staff to reconnect with each other, develop and grow our leadership skills, and discuss issues of race and equity in a safe and open environment. At times, we also use Weds to continue the work begun at our Tuesday meetings.

Students who attend and participate on both Tues (governing day) & Wed (activity day) will of course have more opportunities to meet more competencies (to earn more credit) than those who attend once a week. Students may also opt to work on projects outside of committee time to meet governing committee competencies/earn more credit. See Melissa for details.

Poster Brigade - TUES (Governing Committee)
Becky Laird, 1st Semester 2019-20
Becky's Room - 201 : Tue 13:50-14:30

SS - Student Government / 0.15

Poster Brigade works in collaboration with the rest of the Nova community to create posters and flyers for Nova events and to help disseminate important information to the community. Poster Brigade is held as a quiet space.

Recruitment Committee
Debbie Kuttner, 1st Semester 2019-20
Rm 220 : Tue/Thu 13:50-14:30

UE - Leadership / 0.25

Recruitment Committee oversees the functioning of all recruitment-related activities here at Nova. In particular, this committee can make decisions that effect how Nova is going about bringing new students into our community as well as how we are perceived by those potential new recruits.

We need students in order to be a school! And we need people to know about Nova and want to come here in order to get those students! Basically, Recruitment is essential to the survival of Nova and all that we are doing here.

Decisions are made through consensus-building whenever possible.

Safety
Eyva Winet, 1st Semester 2019-20
122 Brian's Room : Tue 13:50-14:30

SS - Student Government / 0.13

By popular demand and necessity for keeping our behinds covered, a new committee has been created to address issues of physical and emotional safety at Nova! It was given the following powers by United Nova: writing the district safety plan, improving our disaster preparedness, being in charge of drills, reviewing and evaluating emergencies and improving our process of addressing emergencies, managing shared public spaces at Nova, including outdoor spaces, helping resolve issues that make students, staff and/or the community feel unsafe, supporting restorative processes when Nova Norms are broken and physical or emotional safety is compromised.

Second Life for Misfit Toys
Lydia Wynn, 1st Semester 2019-20
207 - Winnie's Room

None assigned

Find and rebuild toys that have lived a previous life

Donate toys to children’s charities

Creatively re-invent toys

Collaborate on toy ideas and how to share them.

Second Life for Misfit Toys, Wednesday Edition
Adam Croft, 1st Semester 2019-20
Room 202 and beyond : Fri 13:50-14:30

UE - Leadership / 0.15

Students will will use various sewing and crafting skills to bring a second life to misfit toys.

This committee also meets in Lydia W.’s room, Friday afternoons.

Senior Committee
Mark Perry, 1st Semester 2019-20
Room 121

None assigned

Seniors will work collaboratively to:

1) support each other’s progress toward graduation.
2) create and facilitate the June 2020 graduation ceremony
3) develop and implement ideas on how to best mentor and support new Nova students
4) create a senior project as part of “giving back” to Nova

Sound Committee
Matthew Maley, 1st Semester 2019-20
Band Room : Tue 13:50-14:30

SS - Student Government / 0.13

Video Game Social Committee
Julia Reade, 1st Semester 2019-20
Room 208 : Fri 13:50-14:30

UE - Personal Growth / 0.25

This INVITE ONLY committee is a structured, student-lead committee designed to offer students an opportunity to further develop their social skills. The group will gather around a common interest—gaming—and engage in discussions about this topic.

Walk the Walk 2019-20
Jennifer Spigner, 1st Semester 2019-20
Room 111 : Thu 13:50-14:30

SS - Student Government / 0.15

The Walk The Walk Committee is committed to providing a centralized list of service learning opportunities for students with a social justice focus to volunteering in the community. This committee will keep a list of service learning opportunities for students and staff to access. The committee is in the initial stages so we are asking staff to please forward any opportunities to the three of us members listed below so we can start compiling the service learning list.

Elective

Chess and its Variants
Stefan Gruber, 1st Semester 2019-20
Animation Lab : Wed 11:40-12:20

N/A / 0.25

Your objective will be to improve your chess playing abilities, and learn some variations on the chess rules.

Music Theory
Matthew Maley, 1st Semester 2019-20
Band Room : Mon/Wed 14:35-16:00

ART - Music Theory / 0.5

Prerequisites: A willingness to learn music theory and use them to write music. Musical talent is not required. Sign up early, the class is limited to 15 students!

Level: What you make it.

Description: This is a class in which you will learn the fundamentals of music and use them to write your own music. If you have always wanted to write music, or even if that urge is brand new, this is your chance. You do not need to already know how to play an instrument or write lyrics, you only need a love of music and a willingness to participate. Units will include: Introduction to Rhythm, Reading music, Scales and chords, Writing lyrics, melodies and harmonies, and Genre and composition

Study! (M/W 10:15)
Becky Laird, 1st Semester 2019-20
Becky's Room (201) : Mon/Wed 10:15-11:40

None assigned

This course is designed for students with and without Individual Education Plans. Students will use this time to set goals, stay current on assignments, plan for completing long term assignments and practice strategies that will benefit them academically.

Study! (M/W 12:20)
Becky Laird, 1st Semester 2019-20
Becky's Room (201) : Mon/Wed 12:20-13:45

None assigned

This course is designed for students with and without Individual Education Plans. Students will use this time to set goals, stay current on assignments, plan for completing long term assignments and practice strategies that will benefit them academically.

Study! (T/Th 12:20)
Becky Laird, 1st Semester 2019-20
Becky's Room (201) : Tue/Thu 12:20-13:45

None assigned

This course is designed for students with and without Individual Education Plans. Students will use this time to set goals, stay current on assignments, plan for completing long term assignments and practice strategies that will benefit them academically.

Yes, and...
Julia Reade, 1st Semester 2019-20
Guest Teacher

ART - Theatre 1/Acting / 0.5

Improv and art games. This class will be in two parts: weekly improve workshops with Action Faction (an improve school for nuero-divergent learners) and visual art workshops hosted by Vida. The joining theme will be participatory, process focused, student-centered curriculum.

Fine Arts

Art Survey: Jewelry Exploration (M/W 12:20)
karen kosoglad, 1st Semester 2019-20
219 : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:20-13:45

ART - Art Survey / 0.5

Learning Objectives

This is an advanced art class and a prerequisite of other art classes is required or student can show a portfolio of work. New students are encouraged to build a foundation in slow time and drawing into printmaking.

We will be developing processes to make all kinds of wearable art including enameling, soldering, metal etching, sawing metal, reclaimed/up cycling,small sculpture, fiber arts and more. This class will include research, inquiry, material acquisition, creative play. Wire and combining materials will be explored. We will use sketching nature and natural forms for inspiration.

This is an art survey class of both 2 and 3 dimensional design. Students will be invited to explore many art mediums and techniques. Printmaking ,drawing, painting, and sculpture will be offered. There will be a focus on the foundations of visual art and design.

A Sketchbook is required.

Learning Requirements

1.
The student understands and applies arts knowledge , and visual arts.
1.1.
Understands and applies arts concepts and vocabulary.
1.2.
Develops arts skills and techniques.
1.3.
Understands and applies arts genres and styles of various artists, cultures, and times.
2.1.
Applies a creative process to the arts.
2.2.

The student communicates through the arts.

Ceramics (M/W 8:45)
karen kosoglad, 1st Semester 2019-20
Art Room 219 : Mon/Wed 8:45-10:10

ART - Ceramics / 0.5

This class is for all levels. Students will be introduced to basic techniques of working with clay. Learning how to center the clay, hand building and sculpture will be explored. Many different glaze applications will be introduced. Students will learn about function and form through their exploration of clay and process.

INDEPENDENT CONTRACT
karen kosoglad, 1st Semester 2019-20
219

None assigned

INDEPENDENT CONTRACT

Brief course description from the student- intention to study specific art medium inquiry and investigation

Learning goals and purpose will be written with specific study and ideas – through practice experimentation and revision investigate materials processes and ideas.

Meeting schedule- students and teacher will set 2x a month for a formal check in and conversation to look at portfolio .

expected outcomes will be a collaboration of ideas that can change and be modified.

Method of evaluation- portfolio and sketchbook with 3 reflections on goals and personal growth.-communication and reflection-communication of ideas about art and design

Verification of credit will be completed by the end semester .

ct -

Individual content goals, EALR’s and course/credit code(s) will be included in the enrollment section for each student contract.

Learning Requirements
Communication
1.
The student uses listening and observation skills and strategies to gain understanding. To meet this standard, the student:
1.1.
Uses listening and observation skills and strategies to focus attention and interpret information.
1.2.
Understands, analyzes, synthesizes, or evaluates information from a variety of sources.
2.
The student uses communication skills and strategies to interact/work effectively with others. To meet this standard, the student:
2.1.
Uses language to interact effectively and responsibly in a multicultural context.
2.2.
Uses interpersonal skills and strategies in a multicultural context to work collaboratively, solve problems, and perform tasks.
2.3.
Uses skills and strategies to communicate interculturally.
3.
The student uses communication skills and strategies to present ideas and one’s self in a variety of situations. To meet this standard, the student:
3.1.
Uses knowledge of topic/theme, audience, and purpose to plan presentations.
3.2.
Uses media and other resources to support presentations.
3.3.
Uses effective delivery. The student analyzes and evaluates the effectiveness of communication. To meet this standard, the student:
4.1.
Assesses effectiveness of one’s own and others’ communication.
4.2.
Sets goals for improvement.

Sketch Book Mixed Media Collage A (M/W 8:45)
karen kosoglad, 1st Semester 2019-20
Art Room 219 : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

ART - Multimedia 1 / 0.5

Facilitate and introduce a variety Arts Medium with a focus on sketch books. students will collage and learn printmaking techniques and produce individual portfolios. Exploration of a diverse approach to printmaking through, mono prints, collographs, linoleum block, dry point, silk screen, reduction prints, 3 color blocks and image transfers. Through a combination of many printing techniques students can combine and alter their final images..

Sketch Book Mixed Media Collage B (M/W 12:20)
karen kosoglad, 1st Semester 2019-20
Art Room 219 : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:20-13:45

ART - Multimedia 1 / 0.5

Facilitate and introduce a variety Arts Medium with a focus on sketch books. students will collage and learn printmaking techniques and produce individual portfolios. Exploration of a diverse approach to printmaking through, mono prints, collographs, linoleum block, dry point, silk screen, reduction prints, 3 color blocks and image transfers. Through a combination of many printing techniques students can combine and alter their final images..

Health

Gender Tea
Eyva Winet, 1st Semester 2019-20
Sanctuary B20 : Wed 13:50-14:30; Fri 13:50-14:30

UE - Personal Growth / 0.25

Gender Tea
Is the gender binary getting you down? How about the gender hierarchy? Tired of other people telling you what your identity is or should be or that your doing it wrong? Want to drink tea and chat with other rad people who want to talk about gender, sex and sexuality in a safe and supportive space? Want to imagine space where all bodies are safe, free and celebrated? Want to work toward creating that here and now? Everyone is welcome and encouraged to come as long as you can agree to the safety norms grown in the group.

We will also be reading books this semester. Talk to Eyva about Health or other kinds of credit.

Health
Susan Barth, 1st Semester 2019-20
Room #B3 : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:15-11:40

HE - Health Education HS / 0.5

We will be exploring deeper meaning and connections within your physical, mental and social well being and how to relate them to yourself, those close to you and your local and global communities. You will gain a holistic understanding of how to recognize when aspects of your health are out of balance, how to create safe practices surrounding your health and the choices you make. We will explore what is needed to keep your body, identity and community healthy. We will work on positive goal setting around your health and aspects that may affect it. You will create ways in which you can empower yourself in your own health and take positive action.

Communicating Ideas in Health
Students will be able to share and teach information that they have gathered on issues of importance for their own health.
Intro to the Adam Project, including Service Learning.
The student can create traditional presentations of information. i.e. research posters and/or presentations
The student can create non-traditional presentations of information. i.e. artistic responses, games, coloring books, comic books, technology, etc.
The student can communicate understanding to peers, experts and laypersons.
The student will use technology to communicate, educate and call to action for conservation projects. This will include websites, blogs, social media etc.

Language Arts

A-Lit
Debbie Kuttner, 1st Semester 2019-20
Rm 220 - Debbie's room : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

LA - 12A Comparative Lit & Comp / 0.5; LA - 12B Comparative Lit & Comp / 0.5

Take your passion(s) and make one huge semester-long inquiry project that is all about: Social Justice, Educating Others, Research, Writing, and Presenting. We will build a community together where everyone in the room will be getting credit for their service learning, senior project and presentation, and senior research paper (and maybe more!). Wow! The “a” in A-Lit secretly stands for Adam, because it was Adam who suggested that 2018-2019 be a pilot year for trying to roll up all the senior requirements into one HUGE social justice inquiry project. PIlot year is over. This is the real deal! (Please note: if you are looking for a slighly different senior class, come talk to me and maybe we can make this class be your … how to get into college, write a 12-15 page research paper, finish your credits for graduation, or all-around joy-infused senior year extravaganza!)

Blog on Novaknows.com
Debbie Kuttner, 1st Semester 2019-20
Debbie's Room 220 : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:20-13:45

LA - Journalism Writing / 0.5

There is an art to writing for yourself. Some call it narrative essay, some call it blogging, or journalling or sometimes it’s just about getting your ideas out there onto the interwebs and sharing your thoughts about music, movies, books, video games, politics, art, etc. In this class students will learn how to communicate ideas to an audience. There will be opportunities for writing reviews, interviews, research, and narratives. Some students will step up to be peer editors, some to work on the technical side (wordpress is our platform); some students will choose to write weekly columns, or to be investigative reporters. We will make decisions as a community of learners, perhaps tying ourselves directly with committees or other Nova/community entities (like facilitating a space for the PTSA, coor groups, Douglas Truth library, and more).

Check out novaknows.com and come and make it more of what it is, or something completely different.

Freshfolks
The Dark Knight Batman, 1st Semester 2019-20
102 : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

LA - 9A Intro to LIT & COMP / 0.5

This class can only being considered for LA 9A.

WARNING: THERE WILL BE NO CELL PHONES ALLOWED IN THIS CLASS. IF YOU CAN’T DEAL WITH THAT IT IS GOING TO BE A LONG SEMESTER. IF YOU TAKE A CELL PHONE DURING CLASS WITHOUT PRIOR PERMISSION FROM YOUR COORDINATOR YOU WILL BE MARKED AS ABSENT FOR THE DAY. AT YOUR 7TH ABSENCE YOU WILL LOSE HALF OF YOUR CREDIT.

This Freshfolks class is designed to orient and introduce you to how Nova works and what language arts classes are like here. As the course title suggest, we hope to move from inquiry (how to pose inquiry and to take ownership over your learning) to understanding (understanding Nova norms and inquiry-based approach to teaching and learning). During the class you will read stories, a novel, watch films and documentaries, and practice your philosophical, writing, and communication skills. You will write an essay, a research paper, and at least one piece of creative writing (a story or poem). You will also do a book project (not report).
Additionally, as you experiment with writing in different genres, you will learn something about analyzing a text (i.e., a story, poem, film, or image) and how to give an account of how something means what it does (or what you think it does). Students in this course will be encouraged to read and reflect on their own ideas and experiences and then examine these ideas in relation to the films and other texts we read and analyze together.

Our goal for the semester will be to read, write, think, and discuss things that matter most to us. In other words, we want to find things we care about and then talk and write about them together. We will strive to develop an inquiry community where we can respectfully share, discuss, and critique our ideas and the ideas of others. We will push each other to think carefully about our beliefs and assumptions about the world as well as how we’ve come to understand the world and ourselves in particular ways. With an eye toward these ends, students will engage in daily, meaningful reading, writing, speaking, and listening tasks in English class and at home.

Me Vs. You
Chelsey Richardson, 1st Semester 2019-20
Melissa's Room - Moon 101 : Mon/Wed/Fri 14:35-16:00

LA / 0.5

“Me Verses You”, will be an exploration of R&B music, poetry, and literature from the 80’s, and 90’s. We will examine the ways in which these artistic mediums depict and perpetuate ideas about gender, race and class. Students will take what they’ve learned and engage in research from the perspective of their generation’s artistic expression of R&B music, poetry, and literature. We will think critically about what we read and listen to and investigate the ways in which language and guide society. Students will engage in learning in a variety of ways. We will read, write, watch music videos, and movies.

This class is taught by Chelsey!

Playwriting
Susan Watters, 1st Semester 2019-20
Dance Room : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:15-11:40

LA - Creative Writing / 0.5

Young Playwrights Program (YPP) sponsored by ACT Theatre. Facilitator: K. Brian Neel

This playwriting class will equip you with tools for creative self-expression, endowing self-confidence and the sense that ideas—about yourself, the world, and the challenges you face—matter. Your voice will be heard. All aspects of writing for the theater will be explored, including character, story, conflict, genre, driving action through dialogue, and the power of the unspoken word. There will be much improvisation and game-play. We will write quickly and fearlessly in an atmosphere of risk taking, with positive and constructive feedback.

Students in this class can receive either LA-Creative Writing credit or FA-Theatre 8/Playwriting credit.

Poetry
Melissa Park, 1st Semester 2019-20
Melissa's room, Moon 101 : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:20-13:45

LA - Poetry / 0.5

This is a class about the power of language to heal, to incite, to inform, to describe, to express feelings. It has two main goals: to practice/learn how to read poetry for meaning and purpose, and to write your own poems. Writing, after all, is a form of thinking—about your life, about your world. Imagine what’s possible when one develops a regular (even daily) practice of writing, for yourself. To get good at it also requires that you read—A LOT. This builds your “ear for language” muscles, your growing breadth of human experiences as expressed in others’ stories/words, and growing your awareness of/engagement with all kinds of experimental, beautiful, wacko, rhyming, narrative, heartfelt, and powerhouse literature out there waiting to be read—and a reminder that you can always be part of that world too.

Earning full credit includes turning in a portfolio of 16 original poems written this semester AND a portfolio of 20 analyses of other people’s poems (you will have lots of time in class to do these). This semester I am changing the format of how students can share their analyses/interpretations of poems—and will post details here ASAP. Students will still be required to lead one seminar in front of the class that lasts 15-20 minutes.

Expect to read and discuss A LOT of poems to explore a range of how poets in different places and eras have used language to describe the “unsayable” in their lives. Expect to really use your ears and listening skills to develop a feel for the music, tone, and rhythm in others’ poetry and our own. Expect to sit with big questions most all humans face. Expect to work on strategies to push through frustrations with writing. We’ll do writing games, exercises from prompts, and experiment with various poetic forms. Taking this class means you’re expected to actively participate in building and sustaining a writing community—one that cultivates sincerity, respect for others, mindfulness, and really listening.

We may do ‘poetry field trips’ to read and write outdoors and/or in different settings, and co-create a group poetry project that could look like hosting an open mic or poetry reading at or away from school, or a class poetry ’zine or cd, or something else entirely. Look forward to awesome guest poets and workshops. Students are also encouraged to participate in Youth Speaks Seattle writing circles, open mics, and local slams.

PLEASE REMEMBER, NO CELL PHONES ARE ALLOWED IN THE CLASS. SERIOUSLY. DO NOT SIGN UP FOR THIS CLASS IF YOU CAN’T HANDLE THIS. (You will be marked absent if your phone is out during class.)

ATTENDANCE: For 0.5 credit, students can miss up to six classes (excused or unexcused) until they need to complete projects to make up for missed community competencies. Students will have multiple options to demonstrate they’ve met these missed competencies.

Queer Eye for Film
The Dark Knight Batman, 1st Semester 2019-20
Rm 102 : Mon/Wed 10:15-11:40

LA / 0.5

CELL PHONES WILL NOT BE ALLOWED IN THIS CLASS. IF YOU CAN’T DEAL WITH THAT DO NOT TAKE THE CLASS. YOU WILL BE MARKED ABSENT IF YOU TAKE IT OUT. AFTER SEVEN ABSENCES YOUR POSSIBLE CREDIT WILL BE CUT IN HALF.

This class will be examining queer films. We will examine these films through the lens of gender identity and sexuality. We will also look at film making in general, film tropes, representation and its aspects in conjunction with a capitalist society, symbolism and theme in films, and how all of this is relevant to you. You will do a project on each film that is reflective in nature. You will examine your own history and education regarding gender identity and sexuality as well as understand and contemplate the concept of gender fluidity and the deconstruction of a gender binary. We will also be looking at intersectional issues regarding gender and race.

Possible films we may watch are:
The Celluloid Closet
Moonlight
Paris is Burning
Rafiki
But I’m a Cheerleader
TransAmercia
Bird Cage
and many more.

Work for this class will have to be done outside of the class since we will devote as much time as possible to watching and discussing the films.

Series of Fortunate Events
Julia Reade, 1st Semester 2019-20
Various

LA / 0.25; LA / 0.25

As the name states, this is a series of intensives. Students could take the entire series or a single intensive, using the remainder of the time as a structured study hall. Each intensive will be for .25 credit. Perfect for those students missing a tad of credit here and there.

The first class in the series will be taught by Julia and Jared. The theme is games! Students will play and bring to life their favorite sedentary games.

Dates: 9/11-10/25
Days: M,W, Every Friday

Description: We will be bringing our favorite sedentary games to life! By reimagining their games such as D&D, chess, Magic, Plants vs Zombies, students will have the opportunity to demonstrate competency in PE and/or Language Arts towards a total of .25 credit. Students may also work with Jared, Julia, and a math teacher to identify and demonstrate missing math competencies in a way similar to the opportunities Mike provided in Infernal Casino. Opportunities to demonstrate other academic competencies towards missing credit may be available upon request

The Art of Fiction
Debbie Kuttner, 1st Semester 2019-20
Rm 220 - Debbie's Room : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

LA - 11B Amer LIT & COMP / 0.5

Let’s read books! Wait, what is a book in the 21st century? Let’s look at a variety of genres (science fiction, fantasy, sci fi, dystopias, horror, alternate history, historical fiction, and more). And while we are at it, let’s make our own multimedia books—using found materials. Let’s build something we can all be proud of.
Students will be expected to read, sometimes with ears, sometimes with eyes, and sometimes with both. Students will be expected to write, sometimes with mouth, and sometimes with fingers—using a variety of implements.

The Good Death
The Dark Knight Batman, 1st Semester 2019-20
Room 102 : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

LA-H / 0.5

YOU WILL HAVE TO GET A PERMISSION SLIP SIGNED BY YOU AND YOUR PARENT/GUARDIAN TO SIGN-UP FOR THIS CLASS. YOU CAN OBTAIN THIS FROM TERRANCE. AGAIN, I WILL NOT ALLOW YOU TO SIGN-UP FOR THIS CLASS WITHOUT A COMPLETED PERMISSION SLIP.

PLEASE READ THE TRIGGER WARNINGS BELOW. PLEASE DO NOT TAKE THIS CLASS IF YOU ARE SUICIDAL, HAVE INTENSE PROBLEMS WITH DISSOCIATION, DEPRESSION, OR OTHER MENTAL DISORDERS THAT COULD BE ADVERSELY AFFECTED BY TALKING ABOUT DEATH, CANNOT HAVE COMPASSION FOR OTHER HUMANS, CANNOT ALLOW OTHERS TO EITHER BE OR NOT BE RELIGIOUS OR SPIRITUAL OR ATHEISTIC OR AGNOSTIC, OR STRUGGLE TO PROVIDE PEOPLE SPACE TO EXPLORE WHAT THEY BELIEVE OR DON’T UNDERSTAND.

TRIGGER WARNINGS (Please read): Clearly, we will be talking about death. Death comes in many forms so we will be discussing those as well – suicide, violence, etc. We will be talking about different types of reality, meaning, and belief systems. We will explore the physical manifestation in the body of death and the burial/death rituals of many different cultures. This will involve in some cases visuals of the dead and perhaps blood or other viscera.

CELL PHONES WILL NOT BE ALLOWED IN THIS CLASS. IF YOU CAN’T DEAL WITH THAT DO NOT TAKE THE CLASS. YOU WILL BE MARKED ABSENT IF YOU TAKE IT OUT. AFTER SEVEN ABSENCES YOUR POSSIBLE CREDIT WILL BE CUT IN HALF.

Okay, now for the description.

This class is important.

You live in a country that has a very overt fear of death. So much so that it is both trivialized, exploited, and not spoken of all at the same time.

So, I want to boldly start a conversation and an exploration into death.

We will explore what this fear has created in both this culture and you (if anything). You will deeply explore what you think/feel about death while you hear from your peers what they think and feel as well. You will research other cultures so you can get an idea of how these cultures treat death and the dead. We will hear from doctors about what actually happens to the body when it dies. I am trying to get an undertaker to come in and talk with you all about their job. We will also mediate in this class on death as well as life. We will look at poetry, stories, art, film, and so much more on the subject of death. We will examine grief as much as we examine love.

Your responsibility will be to try and be there while all this happens.
Your responsibility will be to work hard to discover what you believe.
You also have the responsibility to engage in the work of trying to discover what it means to you to have a good death and then take on the grail quest to deliver these revelations back to your classmates through a presented project.

You will write an essay, a short research paper, keep a journal, write reflections, learn about dreams and interpreting them, and do multiple projects throughout the course of this class.

We will read texts and look at how literature uses the dead, speaks of the dead, teaches us about dying.
We will watch films to see visuals of how death is taught, or not taught.

Your responsibility is to listen to your peers and do everything you can to learn from them and be compassionate.
Your ultimate responsibility is to become human and perhaps this is a good start.

Words of Many Colors
The Dark Knight Batman, 1st Semester 2019-20
Rm 102 : Tue/Thu 8:45-10:10

LA / 0.5

THIS IS AN ETHNIC STUDIES CLASS AND WILL FULFILL THE GRADUATION REQUIREMENT FOR IT.
ALSO, THIS IS PRIMARILY A READING CLASS. You have the possibility to read or listen to multiple pieces in this class, but you will be required to do the work in order to get credit. If you feel that a piece of writing is above your level, simply tell me, or your coordinator, or any one in this building, or your folks/guardians and have them tell me, and I will find you something that is at your level.
NO CELL PHONES ARE ALLOWED OUT IN THIS CLASS WITHOUT PERMISSION. YOU WILL BE COUNTED ABSENT FOR THE CLASS IF YOU TAKE IT OUT IN CLASS. IF YOU CAN’T HANDLE THAT THEN DO NOT SIGN UP FOR THIS CLASS.

This class will take the approach of ethnic studies through the critical lens of literature, poetry, play, and essay. We will read a few books, a couple plays, maybe see a few films, and have discussions. This will ultimately all lead to you creating an action project around being an antiracist.
This class will work exclusively toward decentering the White narrative. This means we will be exploring what dominant narratives are and how they affect our lives. We will be looking at critical narratives provided through the stories told by others. We will look at how People of Color have resisted and still resist the oppression and repressions that they have been subjugated to for the last 400 years in this culture. We will look at how unequal power, racism, and racist policies have served to create great wealth, as well as many other privileges, for certain people in this country.
Please expect to READ A LOT. We will do a lot of reading in class, where I read to you, but you will have to do some reading at home. I won’t make it a crazy amount of reading at home, but please understand you will have to take the time to do some at home. Again, when possible, you are more than welcome to listen to a book if that is easier for you. Watching a movie of the book is not the same thing since movies leave out many aspects of novels.
Here are some of the books we will be reading or reading from:

How to Be an AntiRacist – Ibram Kendi
The Truth about Stories – Thomas King
There There – Tommy Orange
The Hate U Give – Angie Thomas (Film too)
Exit West – Mosin Hamid
They Called Us Enemy (graphic novel) – George Takei
The White Card (play) – Claudine Rankin
Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom (play) – August Wilson
A Raisin in the Sun (play) – Lorraine Hansberry (Film too)

Please expect to do projects that reflect on who you are, where you come from, how you know what you know, and what you would do in certain situations pertaining to race. Ultimately, you will create an action project around social justice/antiracism, put it into effect, collect data on it and report back to the class on what you learned. This will be your final project of the class.

World Building
Debbie Kuttner, 1st Semester 2019-20
Rm 220 - Debbie's Room : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

LA - 11B Amer LIT & COMP / 0.5

Let’s create worlds. On Mondays students will engage in their own world building project that will last the whole semester. They will be guided via on-line feedback and one-on-one teacher meetings where teacher and student will build and assesss their competencies together. On Wednesdays, the whole class will engage in building one world together, which will involve colloboration for creation as well as creations that then will be collaboarted upon. Students will be expected to read, sometimes with ears, sometimes with eyes, and sometimes with both. Students will be expected to write, sometimes with mouth, and sometimes with fingers, and sometimes via small group of whole class. Students will be expected to read at least one book for the semester, more if they are seeking honors credit and/or above LA10b credit.

Mathematics

Algebra 1A (TuThu 12:20)
Akil Srinivasan, 1st Semester 2019-20
Moon 120 - Science Lab : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

MA - Algebra 1A / 0.5

This is the first semester of Algebra I. This course is appropriate for any students who are interested in taking it, regardless of whether they feel confident in math or not. In addition to learning the fundamentals of algebra, we’ll be devoting weekly class time to developing number sense, mathematical inquiry skills, and pattern recognition. Additional support time is available outside of class for students who would like additional help or more advanced challenges.

This class will cover 5 areas:
1. Numbers and Properties
2. Variables and Equations
3. Intro to Functions
4. Linear Functions
5. Linear Functions, Part II

In addition to the mathematics content, students are expected to

  • listen with respect to another person’s explanation;
  • provide help when asked;
  • ask for help when needed;
  • play an active role in sustaining a safe and encouraging learning space for one another; and
  • treat all materials gently so that they may be reused.

Algebra 1A Tue/Thur 8:45am Rm221
Lance Brown, 1st Semester 2019-20
room 221 : Tue/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

MA - Algebra 1A / 0.5

This is the first semester of Algebra I. This course is appropriate for any students who are interested in taking it, regardless of whether they feel confident in math or not. In addition to learning the fundamentals of algebra, we’ll be devoting weekly class time to developing number sense, mathematical inquiry skills, and pattern recognition. Additional support time is available outside of class for students who would like additional help or more advanced challenges.

This class will cover 5 areas:
1. Numbers and Properties
2. Variables and Equations
3. Intro to Functions
4. Linear Functions
5. Linear Functions, Part II

In addition to the mathematics content, students are expected to

  • listen with respect to another person’s explanation;
  • provide help when asked;
  • ask for help when needed;
  • play an active role in sustaining a safe and encouraging learning space for one another; and
  • treat all materials gently so that they may be reused.

Algebra 2A (MWF 12:20)
Akil Srinivasan, 1st Semester 2019-20
120 - The Science Laboratory : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:20-13:45

MA - Algebra 2A / 0.5

This is the first of two semesters of Algebra 2. This course is appropriate for any students who are interested in taking it, and have taken geometry; it is the 3rd course in the math sequence at Nova. In addition to reviewing the fundamentals of algebra, we’ll be learning about a host of new functions. The main focus will be how to use functions in real-life situations!

Our class will spend time on mathematical inquiry skills, mechanical skills, and how to apply these ideas to real life problems in engineering, science, and student-driven areas of interest.

There will be about 2 hours of homework/studying per week. Be prepared to practice your math skills and collaborate on projects. We will also follow the 8 absence attendance policy, which will help keep you on top of things in this class.

This class will cover the following areas:

  • Re-acquainting with linear functions and mathematical thinking
  • Quadratics
  • Polynomials
  • Rational exponents & Radical functions
  • Exponential & Logarithmic Functions part 1

In addition to the mathematics content, students are expected to

  • Listen with respect to another person’s explanation
  • Engage in discussion
  • Communicate ideas both informally and formally
  • Provide help when asked
  • Ask for help when needed;
  • Play an active role in sustaining a safe and encouraging learning space for one another
  • Treat all materials gently so that they may be reused.

Algebra 2A (TuThuF 8:45)
Akil Srinivasan, 1st Semester 2019-20
120 - The Science Laboratory : Tue/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

MA - Algebra 2A / 0.5

This is the first of two semesters of Algebra 2. This course is appropriate for any students who are interested in taking it, and have taken geometry; it is the 3rd course in the math sequence at Nova. In addition to reviewing the fundamentals of algebra, we’ll be learning about a host of new functions. The main focus will be how to use functions in real-life situations!

Our class will spend time on mathematical inquiry skills, mechanical skills, and how to apply these ideas to real life problems in engineering, science, and student-driven areas of interest.

There will be about 2 hours of homework/studying per week. Be prepared to practice your math skills and collaborate on projects. We will also follow the 8 absence attendance policy, which will help keep you on top of things in this class.

This class will cover the following areas:

  • Re-acquainting with linear functions and mathematical thinking
  • Quadratics
  • Polynomials
  • Rational exponents & Radical functions
  • Exponential & Logarithmic Functions part 1

In addition to the mathematics content, students are expected to

  • Listen with respect to another person’s explanation
  • Engage in discussion
  • Communicate ideas both informally and formally
  • Provide help when asked
  • Ask for help when needed;
  • Play an active role in sustaining a safe and encouraging learning space for one another
  • Treat all materials gently so that they may be reused.

Calculus A Group Independent
Akil Srinivasan, 1st Semester 2019-20
Moon 120 - Science Lab : Mon 14:35-16:00

MA - Calculus A / 0.5

This is the first of two semesters of Calculus. This course is appropriate for any student interested in taking it, but they must have taken precalculus. It is a course in differential and integral calculus. We will focus on both theory (rigorous proofs) and applications. We will treat it as a group independent and learn through textbook readings, discussion, and interesting problems posed by students. Calculus applications are found everywhere, including physics, chemistry, biology, engineering, economics, and practically anything having to do with “change” in the world!

This is group independent that meets to check in every week on only Monday at 2:35 with Lydia W. and Akil
Students must be willing to do most of the learning as an independent outside of the Mon check in time

Competency Recovery
Lydia Wynn, 1st Semester 2019-20
207 - Winnie's Room : Mon/Wed 12:20-13:45

MA - Algebra 1A / 0.5; MA - Algebra 1B / 0.5; MA - Algebra 2A / 0.5; MA - Algebra 2B / 0.5; MA - Geometry A / 0.5; MA - Geometry B / 0.5

The objective of Competency Recovery is to satisfy the requirements of missed competencies in prior math classes. This course will be driven by individual student needs. Each student will complete their own portfolio based on the competencies that they need to complete or strengthen to be on track for graduation.

While building content competencies, students will also develop their skills of:
Perseverance
Communication/Relationship
Modeling
Building Connections

Financial Algebra T/Th Rm221
Lance Brown, 1st Semester 2019-20
B19 Lance's Room : Tue/Thu 8:45-10:10

MA - Algebra 2B / 0.5

In this class we will alternate between the personal and the general. We will learn the everyday skills adults need to establish a budget, bank, save and borrow money, and pay local and national taxes. At the same time, we will be exploring the finances of the country. Just as we look at our own budgets, we will explore the topic of balancing the federal budget and learn about the issues that surround the federal deficit. As we explore the distinction between “wants” and “needs” in our own budgets, we will examine the choices our own country makes in its military spending. As we explore the way taxes are taken out of paychecks (FICA) we will look at the structure and sustainability of Social Security and Medicare. We will explore income tax models comparing fixed-amount taxation to flat/proportional taxes, to the progressive tax model.

This is a math course for students who learn best by doing. It has been designed for those who “think with their hands” and who like to use math in real situations from the get go. We will do many labs and short term projects in this course. In addition to the math, we will be working throughout on problem solving skills, communication skills, and the ability to work on a team, the three attributes employers say are the most important to them.

Geometry A (A) MON 10:15 Rm221
Lance Brown, 1st Semester 2019-20
room 221 : Mon/Wed 10:15-11:40

MA - Geometry A / 0.5

Geometry A (B) MON 12:20 Rm 221
Lance Brown, 1st Semester 2019-20
room 221 : Mon/Wed 12:20-13:45

MA - Geometry A / 0.5

Introduction to Programming
Akil Srinivasan, 1st Semester 2019-20
Moon 120 - The Laboratory : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

MA - Math Analysis A / 0.5

Interested in coding? Want to make some cool applications and games? This is an introduction to the engineering of computer applications emphasizing modern software engineering principles: object-oriented design, decomposition, encapsulation, abstraction, and testing. We’ll use the Java programming language.

This is for students completely new or have little experience with programming

The emphasis is on good programming style, built-in facilities of the Java language, and good software design principles (not your average hack jobs!). No prior programming experience required!

Important: You will watch ~45 min lectures on your own and/or read outside of class. To show evidence of learning the background knowledge, you’ll write brief reflections. Time in class will be spent working on coding projects and getting feedback. You have to be ok spending time watching lectures and/or reading on your own!

Credit: Competencies will be shown through 6 programming projects and lecture/reading reflections.
Available for 3rd year math credit or science seminar credit

We will also follow the 8 absence attendance policy, which will help keep you on top of things in this class.

In addition to the programming content, students are expected to

  • Listen with respect to another person’s explanation
  • Engage in discussion
  • Communicate ideas both informally and formally
  • Provide help when asked
  • Ask for help when needed;
  • Play an active role in sustaining a safe and encouraging learning space for one another
  • Treat all materials gently so that they may be reused.

Pre Calculus A
Lydia Wynn, 1st Semester 2019-20
207 - Winnie's Room : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

MA - Pre-Calculus A / 0.5; MA - Pre-Calculus A H / 0.5

Pre Calculus Learning Objectives

A chance to take mathematics to a whole new level. Using prior mathematics learning (Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2) as a foundation, we are going to explore how math can apply to your world with an introductory Calculus lens. From working with functions as a descriptor of relationships and change, to developing connections between triangles, circles, and functions (trigonometry). We will open our minds to the language that is used to describe the patterns of the world and strengthen your comfort towards working with mathematical notation, graphical representation, and manipulation.

Experience in Algebra 1, Geometry, and Algebra 2 is highly encouraged as they represent the foundation of what we do in Pre Calculus. Complete mastery is not necessary, however genuine effort and honest question asking are welcomed! Please come to class with an open mind about where mathematics can take you in the world.

Statistics/Quantitative Reasoning A
Lydia Wynn, 1st Semester 2019-20
207 - Winnie's Room : Mon/Wed 10:15-11:40

MA - Probability & Statistics A / 0.5

Hello future statisticians!
The goal of this course is to help students build the necessary tools to help them understand the world from an analytical perspective. By building confidence with quantitative reasoning and communication of data, students will explore topics that help people make decision about the status of the world and anything it is. From mean, median, and mode to distribution models, to regression analysis strategies, students will leave this class with a base level understanding of qualitative and quantitative statistical analyses.

Physical Education

Bombardment Society
The Dark Knight Batman, 1st Semester 2019-20
Garfield Community Center : Fri 13:50-14:30

PE - Individual/Dual Activity 1 / 0.25

This class can be Individual/Dual Activity 1.

Students will develop eye hand coordination and learn teamwork through the age old game of dodge ball.

Rethinking PE
Julia Reade, 1st Semester 2019-20
Julia's Room 208 : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

PE - Lifetime Activities 1 / 0.5

Why PE? I can promise you it’s about so much more than merely getting the credits to graduate. There are so many wonderful benefits to being active—stress relief, meeting new people, and just plain old feeling awesome! Together, we will explore creative and traditional activities, starting with their histories and centering stories of marginalized people and groups who participate in the sport. In addition to actively participating in the focus activity, we will brainstorm ways to conduct community outreach in an effort to engage others in more physical activity. Be ready to try a variety of activities from hacky sack to strength circuits to hiking. No previous experience in any sport is required, just an open mind and willingness to try.

Science

Biology
Susan Barth, 1st Semester 2019-20
Susan's RM 3 : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:15-11:40

SC - Biology A / 0.5

Come explore Biology. This class will include, inquiry based science, research, modeling of systems and creating projects. You will hone your experimental skills, creating experiments to further your learning and expand your mind. This class will highlight Cell Biology topics. There will be terminology to learn and apply. As a Biologist, you will share your work with your peers and beyond.

Students will be expected to enter their work in the annual SNART Fair.

There will be a minimum of 2 hours of homework/studying per week. Be prepared to practice your study skills or build them if that is new to you. You will be expected to learn and apply study techniques.

This class will be offered for Biological Science credit. It’s expected that you have some science background. If you need a boost before this class, take Life, Labs and Learning.

Attendance: This class will follow the 6 absence attendance policy, although you should plan to attend class regularly, which will help keep you on top of things in this class. After 6 absences, you will need to complete a project outside of class to have the possibility to earn full credit.

Expectations _ You will be expected to show up and contribute to this class.

Chemistry
Eyva Winet, 1st Semester 2019-20
RM #120 : Mon/Tue/Wed/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

SC - Chemistry A / 0.5; SC - Chemistry B / 0.5

This course is an experiential journey through the essential themes, concepts, models, laboratory skills, mathematics and thinking processes that characterize a molecular understanding of the world. This class emphasizes creating a context for chemistry by understanding the history, philosophy, multi-ethnic perspectives, ethics, applications and relevance of chemistry. Chemistry is a study of the atomic theory, the structure of matter, bonding, nuclear chemistry, fuel chemistry, the periodic table, stoichiometry, reaction chemistry, equilibrium, kinetics, oxidation-reduction chemistry and more. These reactions and concepts explain and control the environment, product manufacturing, the human body, scientific arts like photography and ceramics, food, fermentation and combustion! Expect labs, color changes, burning stuff, and fun! We will also discuss pressing chemical issues and chemical ethics. There is math and writing in this course so get ready to use your whole brain!

Earthology
Adam Croft, 1st Semester 2019-20
Room 202 and beyond : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

SC - Earth Science / 0.5

Students will explore the science and history of the living Earth. In particular, we will pursue an understanding of Gaia Theory as developed by James Lovelock, Lynn Margulis, and other scientists. Students will be expected to develop a broad understanding of the dynamics of the living Earth while also taking on an inquiry and teaching project exploring a particular aspect of Gaia.

Scope and sequence:

I. What is happening here on Earth? How do we find answers to this question? [observe, research, experiment, model]
a. Explore current status of:
i. Lithosphere: rocks, soils, tectonic plates, volcanoes, earthquakes, etc.;
ii. Hydrosphere: oceans (acidification, over-fishing, sea-level rise), fresh water (rivers, lakes);
iii. Cryosphere: ice caps, ocean ice, glaciers, mountain snow/ice;
iv. Atmosphere: carbon dioxide, pollution (sulfur, nitrogen, particulates, etc.), temperature ;
v. Biosphere : habitat destruction, deforestation, mass extinction, invasive species, etc.
b. Project: model an Earth system and how it is changing.

II. How did it get to be this way? How did it used to be? [research, experiment, design]
a. Explore history and dynamics of each Gaia-sphere
b. Project: design a life-supporting planet fundamentally different than the Earth.

III. How could it be again? What can we do as responsible participants in the Earth? How can social justice (ie. Black Lives Matter, NoDAPL Water Protectors, Occupy, etc.) interconnect with Earth justice?
a. Research and discuss key questions related to application of Earth knowledge in conjunction with social justice
b. Project: action-research project linking social and Earth justice.

IV. Final portfolio:
a. Guiding questions:
i. What have you accomplished?
ii. What have you learned?
iii. What are you still pondering?
iv. What are you still struggling over?
v. What will you take with you from this experience?
b. Portfolio:
i. Collected works from the semester
ii. Written reflection on above questions

Environmental Justice
Adam Croft, 1st Semester 2019-20
Room 202 and beyond : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

SC - Science Seminar / 0.5

Students will explore the relations of human groups and places. In this course, we will question, challenge, analyze, and create the relations between humans and the Earth and how these relations have changed throughout human/Earth history. Most class topics will be determined by the course participants, though we will continue to relate these histories to those of the place within which this course is situated: Seattle, Puget Sound, Washington, Pacific Northwest, North America, …

In particular, we will seek to understand and create an ethic of place. Students will leave the course with a set of questions and understandings to help guide future relations between people and place.


WA State History credit is available for this course.*

Questions to be addressed by students participating in this course include:
- how have humans lived in this and other places?
- how are humans currently living in this and other places?
- how could humans live in this and other places?
- how does the Earth live in this and other places upon the Earth?
- what is the state of the planet and its life today?
- how is health/pollution distributed across the planet today and in this place?
- how has the climate crisis come about, and what is its relation to this place?
- how are/will these changes affect(ing) communities differently depending upon race, class, gender, age, sexuality, ability, etc.?
- how are/will these changes affect(ing) plants, animals, ecosystems, oceans, and the living planet (Gaia)?
- what does environmental justice look like in this and other places?
- what does a healthy human civilization living with and upon a healthy planet look like, in this and other places?

Life on Earth
Adam Croft, 1st Semester 2019-20
Room 202 and beyond : Tue/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

SC - Biology B / 0.5

Students will explore the science and history of life on Earth. Students will be expected to develop a broad understanding of the dynamics of life on Earth while also taking on an inquiry and teaching project exploring a particular aspect of Earth’s life. This course will also prepare students for half of the Biology EOC competencies.

Scope and sequence:

I. What is life? How do we answer such a question? [research, classify, design]
a. Zones of exploration
i. Definition of life;
ii. Requirements for life;
iii. Classification of life.
b. Project: Design a viable creature.

II. How do organisms live together? How do we study these interactions? [research, observe, design, experiment]
a. Zones of exploration
i. Ecological relations;
ii. Human-induced changes.
b. Project: Design and conduct a field study.

III. How do organisms change over time? How do we know? [research, scheme]
a. Zones of exploration
i. Evolution by natural selection;
ii. Examples of evolution;
iii. Human evolution.
b. Project: Plausible evolution of creature.

IV. Biology EOC: practice and review

V. Final portfolio:
a. Guiding questions:
i. What have you accomplished?
ii. What have you learned?
iii. What are you still pondering?
iv. What are you still struggling over?
v. What will you take with you from this experience?
b. Portfolio:
i. Collected works from the semester
ii. Written reflection on above questions

Life, Labs and Learning
Susan Barth, 1st Semester 2019-20
Room #B3 : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

SC - Life Science 1 / 0.5


This is an introductory Life Science class. If you already have experimental/lab skills and knowledge in topics like DNA, photosynthesis and genetics, then please take Biology.

This class is for people who like living things, but have not had a lot of experience with studying them. We will be doing experiments in biological topics, learning to ask scientific questions, creating experiments, collecting data and completing lab reports. We will use microscopes, balances and other lab equipment. We will focus on some major topics: Lab Safety and Skills, Critical Thinking in Biology, Ecosystems and Conservation, Study Skills. This class will cover tiny to big Biology. You will explore citizen science projects (Citizen science projects can earn service learning credit), research scientists and current events. Ever wonder what’s in pond water or how forests rely on fungus to survive? Let’s find out. This class will be great for those who are science shy or inexperienced. This is a great prerequisite for Biology, unless you can show that you have some solid experience in these areas to your coordinator.

Social Justice Community

Room of Requirements, theme of knitting and crocheting
Debbie Kuttner, 1st Semester 2019-20
Room 220 : Fri 13:50-14:30

CTE - Apparel & Textiles I / 0.25

If you know how to knit or crochet: create; and if you don’t, learn how to knit or crochet (occ ed credit offered if you document your work and learning) and then either share your individual and group creations with the linus project and/or Seattle World School families, and/or other agencies or persons in need of some hand-knit creations, OR if you provide your own yarn, you are welcome to use your creations any way you like.

Social Studies

AGE on Earth
Adam Croft, 1st Semester 2019-20
room 202 and beyond : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:20-13:45

SS - American Government & Economics / 0.5

We’ll work together to learn how best to explore and confront US systems of governance and economics. How do we participate in government policy making and enforcement? What are methods of social change people and movements have used outside of government institutions? How can our governance and economy responsibly relate to (and even heal) the living Earth systems upon which we all depend?

Be prepared to question, research, take action, reflect, and educate, both within and outside of the Nova community.

Students will learn how to write, research for, and complete a Constitutional Issues Competency-Based Assessment (the “CBA”, a short paper examining a Constitutional issue) that is a state requirement for graduation. ALSO: through this class, interested seniors may complete their culminating social justice inquiry project, and juniors can get a head start!

Course expectations include the following:

COMMUNITY & SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY:
- Student will participate in collective, democratic processes
- Be able to sit with, hold space for, and respect viewpoints different than your own while continuing to think independently
- Listen to the ideas of others and contribute your own ideas
- Take action that contributes meaningfully to the community
- Student will work to cause no harm to self, other beings and the environments we inhabit and will take responsibility for harm that you cause to self, other beings and their environments, regardless of intention
- Student will develop an understanding of systemic harm
- Student will develop an understanding of the inter-connectedness of systemic harm
- Student will take action to change systems that cause systemic harm

American Government and Economics
Brian Aytch, 1st Semester 2019-20
122 : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

None assigned

Human Geography (WH/Ethnic Studies)
Melissa Park, 1st Semester 2019-20
Melissa's room / Rm 101 : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

SS - Ethnic Studies / 0.5

THIS IS AN ETHNIC STUDIES CLASS AND WILL FULFILL THE GRADUATION REQUIREMENT FOR IT.

Human Geography is a shiny new world history & ethnic studies class that aims to take a decolonized approach to studying the how’s and why’s of movements (migrations) of peoples on the planet in past eras through today. How did those movements shape history and ideas of home (what is home?), nation, who gets to belong, who doesn’t belong, and how is the latter group treated as a result of the rules of who gets to belong? How have power and oppression shaped people’s identities, and your own? How have constant human stories of resistance and striving for liberation shaped people’s identities, and your own? How have people held onto cultural traditions, knowledge of family, ancestors, sense of self, if/when they must—or choose to—or are forced to—pick up and leave? What gets lost in the leaving? What is gained? What does it mean to be “from” a place? What does it mean if your people don’t have a physical homeland?

This history class will not focus on memorizing names, dates, and places. Instead, it will challenge students to think deeply about historic trends and tensions within human society. We’ll approach history as a contested subject, one in which a multitude of stories from different perspectives must be weighed and considered as we search for the truth of the origins for why things are the way they are in 2019. We’ll ask what sorts of power do groups of people have, and what ways does power flow? In studying various time periods, we’ll constantly question everything about what it means to be a human who belongs, and critical & dominant narratives about who is seen as a human (and treated accordingly). By the end of the semester, students should be able to construct cohesive narratives that connect current events to past stories.

We will also have lots of fun with maps! Maps act as backdrops for statements about politically imposed boundaries, territoriality, and other notions of power and projection. They can also act as metaphors for seeking location and experiencing dislocation, charting new terrain, exploring ratios to scale, and bringing order to chaos.

  • We will study maps (e.g. how have world borders changed through war, colonialism, and immigration, etc.? Perhaps we’ll shake our heads at outdated ways of grouping people, and take real stock of our version of this/how we are doing it today, and what will future humans think of how we view/treat our world’s land, resources, and inhabitants?).
  • We will make maps (e.g. we’ll try some experimental mapping of things/experiences/ways of being in our own lives today; perhaps we’ll develop a local participatory mapping project to collaborate on with others outside of the class?).
  • We will complete map-based projects as ways of working through some of the above questions (e.g. we’ll explore psychogeography which explores systems and relationships rather than imagery; explore mapping psychological terrain rather than geographical features. In this way maps may be really interesting tools for us to examine critical and dominant narratives.)

PLEASE REMEMBER, NO CELL PHONES ARE ALLOWED IN THE CLASS. SERIOUSLY. DO NOT SIGN UP FOR THIS CLASS IF YOU CAN’T HANDLE THIS. (You will be marked absent if your phone is out during class.)

ATTENDANCE: For 0.5 credit, students can miss up to six classes (excused or unexcused) until they need to complete projects to make up for missed community competencies. Students will have multiple options to demonstrate they’ve met these missed competencies.

US History Intensive
Melissa Park, 1st Semester 2019-20
Melissa's Room / Moon 101 : Mon/Tue/Wed/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

SS - US History 11A / 0.5; SS - US History 11B / 0.5

THIS CLASS MEETS DAILY, MON THRU FRI!

This U.S. History intensive will use reading, writing, art, poetry, discussion, debates, storytelling, role plays, videos, and classroom research to engage ourselves in a process of uncovering our collective and personal histories. We’ll approach history as a contested subject, one in which a multitude of peoples’ stories from different perspectives must be weighed and considered as we search for larger trends and truths in U.S. society. Examining history through a lens of race, class, gender, and power, and also rooted in centering peoples’ humanity, we’ll constantly ask whether the common stories we tell in U.S. history might be biased. If so, what purposes do they serve?

This class will cover American history from the Americas before the arrival of settler-colonialists through modern events and the present day. Examining the origins and maintenance of policies and ideas that shaped the concrete situations of our lives today is a major focus of the class. It will not focus on memorizing names, dates, and places. Instead, it will challenge students to think deeply and critically about historic trends and tensions within U.S. society. We’ll ask what sorts of power do groups of American people have, and what ways does power flow? In studying various time periods, we’ll question everything about what it means to be American and critical & dominant narratives about who is American? (See page 3 for a list of portfolios by historical topics). By the end of the semester, students should be able to construct cohesive narratives that connect current events to early U.S. history, including to our founding documents.

We’ll put a strong emphasis on developing history skills, including researching primary and secondary resources, oral histories, and public memory, spotting and evaluating bias, and developing critical and supported arguments. All students are eligible to earn honors credit, which will involve reading/listening to and working with Ibram X. Kendi’s Stamped From the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America, (and/or additional materials, TBD).

ALSO: through this class, interested seniors may complete their culminating social justice inquiry project, and juniors can get a head start!

This semester, we’ll be completing 6 portfolios. Tentatively, here’s what you can expect:
1. Portfolio 1: Indigeneity, the Americas & Native American Representation through the lens of pre-1492-1620
2. Portfolio 2: Settler-Colonialism, Slavery, Race & Capitalism [American Revolution & the Constitution], through the lens of 1600-1770; 1770-1800
3. Portfolio 3: Abolitionism, Reconstruction, and “democracy” through the lens of 1840-1877
4. Portfolio 4: Industrialization, Progressivism, Imperialism, and “the nadir of race relations” through the lens of 1877-1930
5. Portfolio 5: Migration, Immigration, and the American Dream through the lens of 1870s-1960s
6. Portfolio 6 part 1: Civil Rights Then & Now; Evolution of Mass Incarceration through the lens of 1870s-1975-2019
Portfolio 6 part 2: Vietnam, the Cold War, and Global Power through the lens of 1940s-2019

IMPORTANT: This is not one of those classes that has no homework. This is an upper level class, meaning that I’ll frequently require you to read, write, reflect, watch documentaries, and work on group projects outside of class. I try to space work out and be kind, but if you blow off the work, you’ll get behind and overwhelmed. You will not receive US History credit without completing the work outside of class. PLEASE KNOW that I am SO down to help you whenever and however I can so you can be successful in your learning and credit-earning in this class! Also, this IS a class in which interested seniors (and juniors wanting to get a head start) may complete their culminating social justice inquiry project.

PLEASE REMEMBER, NO CELL PHONES ARE ALLOWED IN THE CLASS. SERIOUSLY. DO NOT SIGN UP FOR THIS CLASS IF YOU CAN’T HANDLE THIS. (You will be marked absent if your phone is out during class.)

ATTENDANCE: For 1.0 credit, students can miss up to ten classes (excused or unexcused) until they need to complete projects to make up for missed community competencies. Students will have multiple options to demonstrate they’ve met these missed competencies.

Washington State History
Adam Croft, 1st Semester 2019-20
Schoology and the city

SS - WA State History (Credit Bearing) / 0.25

Students will explore the history of the state of Washington through the following topical strands:
- Social justice;
- Oral histories;
- First nations;
- Civics and government structures;
- Geography;
- Earth and ecological history and dynamics;
- Economics.

• The class awards 0.25 WA State History credit. This counts as elective credit and fulfills the WA State History graduation requirement.
• There will be a 30 minute in-person orientation that every student must attend to be enrolled. We’ve got two options for that: Thursday, February 18th and Friday, February 19th. On both days, the orientation will happen at 2:30 in the computer lab. If students register for the class later in the semester, they’ll organize a one-on-one orientation with me or Adam.
• The class will be run entirely through Schoology, with all assignments posted there and turned in there.
• The class will require students to travel places around town (such as neighborhoods, parks, and museums) to complete some assignments.
• Students will be required to complete an online check-in at a minimum each week. This online check-in is our equivalent of attendance.
• Students are encouraged to collaborate and complete assignments together, but can also do them solo if they’d like.

World Economics 1
Brian Aytch, 1st Semester 2019-20
122 : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:15-11:40

None assigned

The objective of this course is to examine world history by analyzing economics trends that have shaped today’s societies and nations. This course will explore topics such as trade, migration, employment, free markets and other macroeconomic factors. This class will also focus on geography and natural resources. This course is intended for freshman.

World Economics 2
Brian Aytch, 1st Semester 2019-20
122 : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

None assigned

The objective of this course is to examine world history by analyzing economics trends that have shaped today’s societies and nations. This course will explore topics such as trade, migration, employment, free markets and other macroeconomic factors. This class will also focus on geography and natural resources. Students in this course will analyze the U.S. Stock Market and it’s impact on world trade. China, India, Mexico and other important trade partners will be examined in this course. This course is intended for juniors and seniors.

World Languages

French Studies
Lydia Condrea, 1st Semester 2019-20
RM #204 : Mon/Wed 10:15-11:40

WL - French 1A / 0.5; WL - French 1B / 0.5

All world language classes will start with a week of introduction to Language Acquisition, taught in English. The goal of this part of the course is to provide students with understanding of language acquisition/learning process and to empower them in their endeavor of mastering a new language by making them aware about most effective strategies to be used for reaching that purpose. Afterwards, participants will explore different aspects of French culture, learning linguistic pattern, and applying them in various situations. The instruction is in French. Teaching strategies, as in all language classes at Nova, are targeting language acquisition rather than learning.
EARNING CREDIT: FULL CREDIT upon the condition of 1) PERFECT ATTENDANCE 2) HOMEWORK COMPLETED. Homework is to be completed, there is no such thing as turning the homework in, getting a grade on it or such, homework is the material with which we are working in class, students are changing whatever needs to be changed, take notes, more experienced students are contributing more, beginners observe, follow, progress. Those who do not complete the homework on a regular basis will receive partial credit, absences as well result in lost of part of the credit.
When the student feels ready to demonstrate competencies for 2B level (does not even have to take the class), they are to:
1) Take a written test; 2) Go through an interview; 3) Prepare a project in French, and present it to the class.

Demonstrating 2B or higher competencies assures for that student levels 1A, 1B, 2A, and 2B (or more for higher levels) on their transcript.

German Studies
Lydia Condrea, 1st Semester 2019-20
RM #204 : Fri 13:50-14:30

WL - German 2 Comp NH (Novice High)*1.0 CR / 0.5

All world language classes will start with a week of introduction to Language Acquisition, taught in English. The goal of this part of the course is to provide students with understanding of language acquisition/learning process and to empower them in their endeavor of mastering a new language by making them aware about most effective strategies to be used for reaching that purpose. Afterwards, participants will explore different aspects of German culture, learning linguistic pattern, and applying them in various situations. Teaching strategies, as in all language classes at Nova, are targeting language acquisition rather than learning.

EARNING CREDIT: FULL CREDIT upon the condition of 1) PERFECT ATTENDANCE 2) HOMEWORK COMPLETED. Homework is to be completed, there is no such thing as turning the homework in, getting a grade on it or such, homework is the material with which we are working in class, students are changing whatever needs to be changed, take notes, more experienced students are contributing more, beginners observe, follow, progress. Those who do not complete the homework on a regular basis will receive partial credit, absences as well result in lost of part of the credit.
When the student feels ready to demonstrate competencies for 2B level (does not even have to take the class), they are to:
1) Take a written test; 2) Go through an interview; 3) Prepare a project in German, and present it to the class.

Demonstrating 2B or higher competencies assures for that student levels 1A, 1B, 2A, and 2B or, respectively, higher on their transcript.

Italian Studies
Lydia Condrea, 1st Semester 2019-20
RM #204 : Mon/Wed 14:35-16:00

WL - Italian 1 Comp NM (Novice Mid)*1.0 CR / 0.5; WL - Italian 2 Comp NH (Novice High)*1.0 CR / 0.5

All world language classes will start with a week of introduction to Language Acquisition, taught in English. The goal of this part of the course is to provide students with understanding of language acquisition/learning process and to empower them in their endeavor of mastering a new language by making them aware about most effective strategies to be used for reaching that purpose. Afterwards, participants will explore different aspects of Italian culture, learning linguistic pattern, and applying them in various situations. The instruction is in Italian. Teaching strategies, as in all language classes at Nova, are targeting language acquisition rather than learning.

EARNING CREDIT: FULL CREDIT upon the condition of 1) PERFECT ATTENDANCE 2) HOMEWORK COMPLETED. Homework is to be completed, there is no such thing as turning the homework in, getting a grade on it or such, homework is the material with which we are working in class, students are changing whatever needs to be changed, take notes, more experienced students are contributing more, beginners observe, follow, progress. Those who do not complete the homework on a regular basis will receive partial credit, absences as well result in lost of part of the credit.
When the student feels ready to demonstrate competencies for 2B level (does not even have to take the class), they are to:
1) Take a written test; 2) Go through an interview; 3) Prepare a project in Italian, and present it to the class.

Demonstrating 2B or higher competencies assures for that student levels 1A, 1B, 2A, and 2B on their transcript.

Japanese Studies, intermediate
Lydia Condrea, 1st Semester 2019-20
Mon - room 201, Wed - room 204 : Mon/Wed 14:35-16:00

UE - Teacher Assistant (.25) / 0.5; WL - Japanese 1A / 0.5; WL - Japanese 2A / 0.5; WL - Japanese 3A / 0.5

All world language classes will start with a week of introduction to Language Acquisition, taught in English. The goal of this part of the course is to provide students with understanding of language acquisition/learning process and to empower them in their endeavor of mastering a new language by making them aware about most effective strategies to be used for reaching that purpose. Afterwards, participants will explore different aspects of Japanese culture, learning linguistic pattern, and applying them in various situations. This is an exploratory course, lead by students, advised and directed by Lydia. Learning strategies, as in all language classes at Nova, are targeting language acquisition rather than learning.

EARNING CREDIT: FULL CREDIT upon the condition of 1) PERFECT ATTENDANCE 2) HOMEWORK COMPLETED. Homework is to be completed, there is no such thing as turning the homework in, getting a grade on it or such, homework is the material with which we are working in class, students are changing whatever needs to be changed, take notes, more experienced students are contributing more, beginners observe, follow, progress. Those who do not complete the homework on a regular basis will receive partial credit, absences as well result in lost of part of the credit.
When the student feels ready to demonstrate competencies for 2B level (does not even have to take the class), they are to:
1) Take a written test; 2) Go through an interview; 3) Prepare a project in Japanese, and present it to the class.

Demonstrating 2B or higher competencies assures for that student levels 1A, 1B, 2A, and 2B on their transcript.

Modern Greek Studies
Lydia Condrea, 1st Semester 2019-20
room 204 : Fri 14:35-16:00

WL - Greek 1 Comp NM (Novice-Mid)*1.0 CR / 0.5

All world language classes will start with a week of introduction to Language Acquisition, taught in English. The goal of this part of the course is to provide students with understanding of language acquisition/learning process and to empower them in their endeavor of mastering a new language by making them aware about most effective strategies to be used for reaching that purpose. Afterwards, participants will explore different aspects of Greek language and culture, learning linguistic pattern, and applying them in various situations. Listening activities will be prevalent, attendance is key to success. Teaching strategies, as in all language classes at Nova Project, are targeting language acquisition rather than learning.

EARNING CREDIT: FULL CREDIT upon the condition of 1) PERFECT ATTENDANCE 2) HOMEWORK COMPLETED. Homework is to be completed, there is no such thing as turning the homework in, getting a grade on it or such, homework is the material with which we are working in class, students are changing whatever needs to be changed, take notes, more experienced students are contributing more, beginners observe, follow, progress. Those who do not complete the homework on a regular basis will receive partial credit, absences as well result in lost of part of the credit.
When the student feels ready to demonstrate competencies for 2B level (does not even have to take the class), they are to:
1) Take a written test; 2) Go through an interview; 3) Prepare a project in Moderne Greek, and present it to the class.

Demonstrating 2B or higher competencies assures for that student levels 1A, 1B, 2A, and 2B on their transcript.

Russian Studies
Lydia Condrea, 1st Semester 2019-20
room 204 : Mon/Wed 12:20-13:45

WL - Russian 1 Comp NM (Novice Mid)*1.0 CR / 0.5; WL - Russian 2 Comp NH (Novice High)*1.0 CR / 0.5; WL - Russian 3 Comp IL (Interm Low)*1.0 CR / 0.5

All world language classes will start with a week of introduction to Language Acquisition, taught in English. The goal of this part of the course is to provide students with understanding of language acquisition/learning process and to empower them in their endeavor of mastering a new language by making them aware about most effective strategies to be used for reaching that purpose. Afterwards, participants will explore different aspects of Russian culture, learning linguistic pattern, and applying them in various situations. The instruction is in Russian. Teaching strategies, as in all language classes at Nova, are targeting language acquisition rather than learning.

EARNING CREDIT: FULL CREDIT upon the condition of 1) PERFECT ATTENDANCE 2) HOMEWORK COMPLETED. Homework is to be completed, there is no such thing as turning the homework in, getting a grade on it or such, homework is the material with which we are working in class, students are changing whatever needs to be changed, take notes, more experienced students are contributing more, beginners observe, follow, progress. Those who do not complete the homework on a regular basis will receive partial credit, absences as well result in lost of part of the credit.
When the student feels ready to demonstrate competencies for 2B level (does not even have to take the class), they are to:
1) Take a written test; 2) Go through an interview; 3) Prepare a project in Russian, and present it to the class.

Demonstrating 2B or higher competencies assures for that student levels 1A, 1B, 2A, and 2B on their transcript.

Spanish Studies
Lydia Condrea, 1st Semester 2019-20
RM #204 : Mon/Wed 8:45-10:10

WL - Spanish 1A / 0.5; WL - Spanish 1B / 0.5; WL - Spanish 2A / 0.5; WL - Spanish 2B / 0.5

All world language classes will start with a week of introduction to Language Acquisition, taught in English. The goal of this part of the course is to provide students with understanding of language acquisition/learning process and to empower them in their endeavor of mastering a new language by making them aware about most effective strategies to be used for reaching that purpose. Afterwards, participants will explore different aspects of Spanish culture, learning linguistic pattern, and applying them in various situations. The instruction is in Spanish. Teaching strategies, as in all language classes at Nova, are targeting language acquisition rather than learning.

EARNING CREDIT: FULL CREDIT upon the condition of 1) PERFECT ATTENDANCE 2) HOMEWORK COMPLETED. Homework is to be completed, there is no such thing as turning the homework in, getting a grade on it or such, homework is the material with which we are working in class, students are changing whatever needs to be changed, take notes, more experienced students are contributing more, beginners observe, follow, progress. Those who do not complete the homework on a regular basis will receive partial credit, absences as well result in lost of part of the credit.
When the student feels ready to demonstrate competencies for 2B level (does not even have to take the class), they are to:
1) Take a written test; 2) Go through an interview; 3) Prepare a project in Spanish, and present it to the class.

Demonstrating 2B or higher competencies assures for that student levels 1A, 1B, 2A, and 2B on their transcript.