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Found 103 courses.

Career & Technical Education CTE)

Animation Induction (Level 1, 10th grade and up)
Stefan Gruber, 1st Semester 2018-19
Animation Lab 205 : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

CTE - Animation Tech Graphics 1 / 0.5

Open to all people of all levels of artistic talent from none to godly. Animation is a different art from drawing, so no drawing skills are necessary, only braveness. We’ll be exploring many techniques including 2D puppet, pixelation, flipbooks, clay. It’s a lot of fun and really good exercise for the imagination. We’ll also watch a lot of animation in here to get inspiration and meet with guest animators who make artistic animation for a living.

Fashion Design
Susan Watters, 1st Semester 2018-19
B-07 : Tue/Wed/Fri 10:15-11:40

CTE - Apparel & Textiles I / 0.5

This class will be facilitated by Dorothy Le from Foundry 10.

All experience levels are welcome but be prepared to work in class, this is a “hands on” class.

We will read & create patterns, cut, serge, sew, iron.

Freshamation (Level 1, 9th grade priority)
Stefan Gruber, 1st Semester 2018-19
Animation Lab 205 : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:15-11:40

CTE - Animation Tech Graphics 1 / 0.5

This is the same offering as Animation Induction, but open to freshfolks as a priority.

Open to all people of all levels of artistic talent from none to godly. Animation is a different art from drawing, so no drawing skills are necessary, only braveness. We’ll be exploring many techniques including 2D puppet, pixelation, flipbooks, clay. It’s a lot of fun and really good exercise for the imagination. We’ll also watch a lot of animation in here to get inspiration and meet with guest animators who make artistic animation for a living.

Nova Farm
Susan Barth, 1st Semester 2018-19
Susan's Room #3 and the garden : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:20-13:45

CTE - Env Horticulture 1 / 0.5

In this class, you will experience botany, horticulture, farming, and social justice around food. You will work on the farm, cultivate crops, cook, create and carry out inquiry based experiments to support your learning, learn about environmental issues surrounding agriculture and do projects catered to your interests, including leadership, internships, and career paths. Be prepared to get dirty. This fall, we work on putting some of the garden to bed, planting hardy winter crops and landscaping, art and building. Come ome learn how to use power tools. Grow stuff, the bees need you.

This class can be taken for Occ. Ed. or Science, depending on what your focus is. You will need to work the details out with Susan.

A graduation Social Justice Project could be done in this class.

Open Animation Portal
Stefan Gruber, 1st Semester 2018-19
Room 205 : Mon/Wed/Fri 14:35-16:00

CTE - Animation Tech Graphics 2 / 0.5

Open Portal is a way to extend your projects from other animation classes into a bigger project. For instance, if you have a 300 frame animation piece and want to color it, add shadows, and textures for a more professional feel, this is the place to do that. It also doubles as a place where you can be if you want extra time working on your assignments for Comics, Games, and Animation Class.

Work Site Coordination
Christina Wright, 1st Semester 2018-19
Nova Office

None assigned

Work-based learning activities extend the classroom into the workplace, connecting acquired knowledge and skills to a student‘s future employment. Each student’s individual learning objectives, or goals, will be articulated in the first meeting among the student, their supervisor, and the WBL coordinator (me.) They will be different for each student.

I will enter theses goals after the first meeting.

Yearbook and Building Art
Susan Barth, 1st Semester 2018-19
Rm 3- Susan : Tue/Thu 13:50-14:30

CTE - Publishing Yearbook 1 / 0.25

The Yearbook and Building Art Committee will meet both Tuesday’s and Thursday’s in Susan’s Room B03. We will have multiple threaded focuses. We will be working on creating art for our building and art shares, photographing events and creating our yearbook. We are looking for all types of folks to brainstorm, create, work with technology, organize etc. No experience necessary, just a strong willingness to contribute.This class will be facilitated by Allison, Susan and Karen. We have a number of goals:

1. Yearbook: We are looking for motivated, organized, creative types (you do not need to have all of those traits together). We want photographers, designers, and computer types to help us. We want to capture the amazingness of our community. We also want the yearbook to be affordable for all who want it. So, we will be figuring out new and creative ways to fund raise.

2. Art: Create and solicit other Nova to students to create and display art in and around the Mann Building. We want this building to reflect our creativity and personality.

3. Art Shares: Planning and orchestrating monthly Art Shares.

4. Nova Art History: Documenting for future Nova generations the Art of Nova. Photographing and cataloging all the permanent/semi-permanent art in and around the Mann building. This will include artist information, dates and stories of the art.

The basic credit is .25 per semester, depending on the amount of work you put in.

Committee

Action Faction
Eyva Winet, 1st Semester 2018-19
Moon 120 and Trans Resource Center : Thu 13:50-14:30

UE - Leadership / 0.15

Action Faction Mission Statement:
As an all-inclusive committee, we work to create a safe and respectful community for all genders and sexualities. We combat sexuality and gender identity oppression by creating positive actions in Nova and beyond. Positive actions include maintaining safe spaces for discussions, resources and events. We believe that any social justice movement must work towards inclusion of other social justice goals. We recognize that all oppressions are connected and in no way do we want our actions to propagate other forms of oppression.
Competencies

plan and execute social justice projects that support organizations efforts to end gender and sexuality injustice
learn about power and privilege
explore the interdependence of multiple oppressions
create and execute our own projects that will work toward gender and sexuality injustices
find levity and joy in this hard work
spread sass and camp to the world

Budget Committee
Melissa Park, 1st Semester 2018-19
Lance's Room, B-19 : Thu 13:50-14:30

UE - Leadership / 0.15

This committee is responsible for the fiscal decisions of Nova. The Friends of Nova (formerly the PTSA) raises funds for student and teacher use. It’s the role of this committee to oversee the equitable distribution of these funds. Furthermore, Nova is the only school in the District that has the privilege of designating where and how our school budget is spent. This is the forum within which those conversations and decisions are made.

The learning goals of this committee are:
1. to learn how to read and interpret a fiscal spread sheet;
2. to participate in group decision making;
3. to engage in conversations about equity and opportunity within our community;
4. to provide a space where all students and school groups feel heard and valued and where their proposals are taken seriously;
5. to explore ways to communicate our decisions and dilemmas within the Nova community;
6. to observe and participate in a formal committee structure, including a mild form of Robert’s Rules of Order;
7. and to have the experience of facilitating the running of the committee.

College Prep
Debbie Kuttner, 1st Semester 2018-19
Rm 220 with Debbie & Jennifer : Wed 13:50-14:30

UE - Writing Essentials 1 / 0.15

Please come and meet with Debbie and Jennifer to ask questions, create study plans, work on understanding your graduation plan better, assistance with fafsa (and other ways of getting money to pay for college), plus many more possibilities. Jennifer is Nova’s new career and college counselor and Debbie has been teaching language arts and helping students graduate and get into college for almost twenty years. This committee slot is an opportunity for drop-in support or weekly check-ins about progress. We can review how to work on a college-ready transcript, how to choose colleges to apply to, demystifying the process of an applying. We can help you look into community college options. We can look at scholarships and other issues regarding paying for college. Are you curious about extracurriculars and Nova? Do you want to understand what we do without a gpa? Perhaps you want to work on your essay or have questions about how many letters of recommendation you should plan for. We have answers! We also can help you prep for higher test scores, or decide which tests to take when. Are you interested in AP options? Nova doesn’t have any AP classes, but you can still prep for and take AP exams!
Whatever you want to explore—we are here for you every Wednesday at committee time!

Dungeons and Dragons
Brian Aytch, 1st Semester 2018-19
RM# 122 : Wed 13:50-14:30

None assigned

Dungeons and Dragons is one of most famous and exciting role play game ever created. Imagine a world where a person can create their own character and go on great adventures under the guidance of a creative dungeon master. This is the committee where imagination is the only limit.

Femme
Julia Reade, 1st Semester 2018-19

None assigned

The rainbow of gender expression is beautiful, and expressing femme is great! But living in the patriarchy is hard. This is a safer space for existing as femme in the world. For sharing stories, actively listening and supporting each other. There no issue too big or too small: body autonomy, liquid eyeliner, intersectional feminism, Drake—it’s all on the table, with infinite encouragement. And snacks.

Guild of Calamitous Events
Julia Reade, 1st Semester 2018-19
Julia's Room 208

None assigned

Come plan Nova events and activities, such as prom!

Hiring and Review
Adam Croft, 1st Semester 2018-19
room 202 : Tue/Thu 13:50-14:30

UE - Leadership / 0.15

Terrance will be co-facilitating this committee!

This committee will collect feedback about teachers and coordinators at Nova and share that feedback with teachers and coordinators. We will also participating in hiring new positions and collecting information from the school about FTE needs when hiring needs to take place.

More Chess
Adam Croft, 1st Semester 2018-19
Room 202 : Wed 13:50-14:30

UE - Leadership / 0.1

Come play chess with fellow Nova students! Everyone welcome — no experience required.

Peace of Mind
Akil Srinivasan, 1st Semester 2018-19
Dance Room - B01 : Fri 13:50-14:30

UE - Student Activity / 0.15

We will practice weekly formal mindfulness meditation. No experience necessary! Many studies show that daily meditation can help us deal with a host of mental health issues such as anxiety and depression and help with stress reduction as well!

Planet Nova
Adam Croft, 1st Semester 2018-19
Room 202 and beyond : Tue/Fri 13:50-14:30

UE - Leadership / 0.15

Let’s tend to our school’s relation to the Earth and each other, including through maintaining and strengthening our systems for composting, energy conservation, environmental justice, ecological awareness, and anything else we can do for our living community.

POC Committee
Melissa Park, 1st Semester 2018-19
Tuesdays & Wednesdays: Melissa's room, Moon 101 : Tue/Wed 13:50-14:30

UE - Leadership / 0.25

The People of Color Committee (POCC) is a meeting place for students and staff who identify as people of color.

We meet to build community and hold space for POC students and staff to develop and practice their leadership skills and discuss issues of race and equity in a safe and open environment. Along with Chelsey, Akil, Brian, and Melissa, students will facilitate committee meetings & projects, on a rotating-signups basis.

We’re excited to re-connect with each other and new faces after the summer break, program and host school events, organize field trips, collaborate with local organizations, and teach & learn about our experiences as POC at Nova and Seattle at large.

Poster Brigade (Governing Committee)
Becky Laird, 1st Semester 2018-19
Becky's Room - 201 : Tue 13:50-14:30

UE - Leadership / 0.15

Poster Brigade works in collaboration with the rest of the Nova community to create posters and flyers for Nova events and to help disseminate important information to the community. Poster Brigade is held as a quiet space.

Quiet Coping and/or DBT
Eyva Winet, 1st Semester 2018-19
207 : Fri 13:50-14:30

UE - Personal Growth / 0.25

learn the skills to set boundaries while supporting peers and other loved-ones
practice them in life
share learning
build a community of students with stronger emotional intelligence

Recruitment Committee
Akil Srinivasan, 1st Semester 2018-19
Earth B20 : Thu 13:50-14:30; Tue 13:50-14:30

UE - Leadership / 0.25

Recruitment Committee oversees the functioning of all recruitment-related activities here at Nova. In particular, this committee can make decisions that effect how Nova is going about bringing new students into our community as well as how we are perceived by those potential new recruits.

We need students in order to be a school! And we need people to know about Nova and want to come here in order to get those students! Basically, Recruitment is essential to the survival of Nova and all that we are doing here.

Decisions are made through consensus-building whenever possible.

Safety
Eyva Winet, 1st Semester 2018-19
Moon 120 : Tue 13:50-14:30

UE - Leadership / 0.15

By popular demand and necessity for keeping our behinds covered, a new committee has been created to address issues of physical and emotional safety at Nova! It was given the following powers by United Nova: writing the district safety plan, improving our disaster preparedness, being in charge of drills, reviewing and evaluating emergencies and improving our process of addressing emergencies, managing shared public spaces at Nova, including outdoor spaces, helping resolve issues that make students, staff and/or the community feel unsafe, supporting restorative processes when Nova Norms are broken and physical or emotional safety is compromised.

Senior Committee
Mark Perry, COOR 2018-19
Mark's Room 121

None assigned

Senior Committee supports all of the 2017-18 potential graduates. The committee meets weekly and discusses and plans ways and activities to support seniors ability to graduate and walk at graduation. This year graduation committee is also planning community service activities. During second semester, Senior Committee will plan the graduation ceremony. Through this process students will learn to work together, develop and activate plans and create a graduation plan and ceremony for the 2017-18 graduation.

Spoken Word Committee
Melissa Park, 1st Semester 2018-19
Melissa's room, Moon 101 : Fri 13:50-14:30

UE - Student Activity / 0.1

Spoken Word Committee is a co-created writing community of poets and aspiring writers. Writing, sharing our writing, listening, walks outside, and poetry open mics are regular activities. We hope to continue collaborations with Youth Speaks Seattle and local poets for more rad poetry events and workshops at school and around the city. If you have any interest in writing and/or poetry, join us! ALL are welcome.

United Nova
Michelle Vecchio, 1st Semester 2018-19
105

None assigned

United States supports all school decision making and the committee system.

Video Game Social Committee
Julia Reade, 1st Semester 2018-19
Room 208 : Fri 13:50-14:30

UE - Personal Growth / 0.25

This INVITE ONLY committee is a structured, student-lead committee designed to offer students an opportunity to further develop their social skills. The group will gather around a common interest—gaming—and engage in discussions about this topic.

Wizards of the Toast
Julia Reade, 1st Semester 2018-19
TBD

None assigned

A space to play everyone’s favorite spell-slinging, monster-summoning, mana-flooded collectible card game. Pack your own janky Craw Wurm deck, or grab one of the pre-constructed available. Other board/card games totally welcome. The question on everyone’s mind is of course: “Will there be toast?”

Yearbook and Building Art - Thursday
Allison Sterrett, 1st Semester 2018-19
Rm 3- Susan : Tue 13:50-14:30

UE - Leadership / 0.15

The Yearbook and Building Art Committee will meet both Tuesday’s and Thursday’s in Susan’s Room B03. We will have multiple threaded focuses. We will be working on creating art for our building and art shares, photographing events and creating our yearbook. We are looking for all types of folks to brainstorm, create, work with technology, organize etc. No experience necessary, just a strong willingness to contribute.This class will be facilitated by Allison, Susan and Karen. We have a number of goals:

1. Yearbook: We are looking for motivated, organized, creative types (you do not need to have all of those traits together). We want photographers, designers, and computer types to help us. We want to capture the amazingness of our community. We also want the yearbook to be affordable for all who want it. So, we will be figuring out new and creative ways to fund raise.

2. Art: Create and solicit other Nova to students to create and display art in and around the Mann Building. We want this building to reflect our creativity and personality.

3. Art Shares: Planning and orchestrating monthly Art Shares.

4. Nova Art History: Documenting for future Nova generations the Art of Nova. Photographing and cataloging all the permanent/semi-permanent art in and around the Mann building. This will include artist information, dates and stories of the art.

The basic credit is .25 per semester, depending on the amount of work you put in.

Yearbook and Building Art - Tuesday
Allison Sterrett, 1st Semester 2018-19
Rm 3- Susan : Tue 13:50-14:30

UE - Leadership / 0.15

The Yearbook and Building Art Committee will meet both Tuesday’s and Thursday’s in Susan’s Room B03. We will have multiple threaded focuses. We will be working on creating art for our building and art shares, photographing events and creating our yearbook. We are looking for all types of folks to brainstorm, create, work with technology, organize etc. No experience necessary, just a strong willingness to contribute.This class will be facilitated by Allison, Susan and Karen. We have a number of goals:

1. Yearbook: We are looking for motivated, organized, creative types (you do not need to have all of those traits together). We want photographers, designers, and computer types to help us. We want to capture the amazingness of our community. We also want the yearbook to be affordable for all who want it. So, we will be figuring out new and creative ways to fund raise.

2. Art: Create and solicit other Nova to students to create and display art in and around the Mann Building. We want this building to reflect our creativity and personality.

3. Art Shares: Planning and orchestrating monthly Art Shares.

4. Nova Art History: Documenting for future Nova generations the Art of Nova. Photographing and cataloging all the permanent/semi-permanent art in and around the Mann building. This will include artist information, dates and stories of the art.

The basic credit is .25 per semester, depending on the amount of work you put in.

Elective

Chess and Variants
Stefan Gruber, 1st Semester 2018-19
Animation Lab : Wed 11:40-12:20

Electives / 0.25

Your objective will be to improve your chess playing abilities, and learn some variations on the chess rules.

The Right Thing?
The Dark Knight Batman, 1st Semester 2018-19
102

None assigned

This is an activity in which we will form a Philosophy Club around the basis of Ethics. We will study an ethical dilemma each time we meet to get us ready for the Ethics Bowl (for those who wish to be a part of that) in February.

Fine Arts

advanced studio art and portfolio
karen kosoglad, 1st Semester 2018-19
room 219 : Tue 13:50-14:30

ART - Exploring the Arts / 0.5

This is a 1.5 hour class meeting on Tues. at 2:35 This class is designed for advanced individualized studio exploration for portfolio creation. Ceramics, printmaking, drawing painting and mixed media collage will be available.

art survey: Jewelry Exploration
karen kosoglad, 1st Semester 2018-19
219 : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

ART - Art Survey / 0.5

Learning Objectives

This is an advanced art class and a prerequisite of other art classes is required or student can show a portfolio of work. New students are encouraged to build a foundation in slow time and drawing into printmaking.

We will be developing processes to make all kinds of wearable art including enameling, soldering, metal etching, sawing metal, reclaimed/up cycling,small sculpture, fiber arts and more. This class will include research, inquiry, material acquisition, creative play. Wire and combining materials will be explored. We will use sketching nature and natural forms for inspiration.

This is an art survey class of both 2 and 3 dimensional design. Students will be invited to explore many art mediums and techniques. Printmaking ,drawing, painting, and sculpture will be offered. There will be a focus on the foundations of visual art and design.

A Sketchbook is required.

Learning Requirements

1.
The student understands and applies arts knowledge , and visual arts.
1.1.
Understands and applies arts concepts and vocabulary.
1.2.
Develops arts skills and techniques.
1.3.
Understands and applies arts genres and styles of various artists, cultures, and times.
2.1.
Applies a creative process to the arts.
2.2.

The student communicates through the arts.

Ceramics
karen kosoglad, 1st Semester 2018-19
Art Room #31 : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:15-11:40

ART - Ceramics / 0.5

This class is for all levels. Students will be introduced to basic techniques of working with clay. Learning how to center the clay, hand building and sculpture will be explored. Many different glaze applications will be introduced. Students will learn about function and form through their exploration of clay and process.

Music Theory and Songwriting
Michelle Vecchio, 1st Semester 2018-19
Band Room : Tue/Thu 21:59-21:59

None assigned

Prerequisites: A willingness to learn music theory (chord progressions, rhythm, and melody) and
use them to write music. Musical talent is not required. Sign up early, the class is limited to 15
students!
Level: What you make it.
Description: This is a class in which you will learn the fundamentals of music and use them to
write your own music. If you have always wanted to write music, or even if that urge is brand
new, this is your chance. You do not need to already know how to play an instrument or write
lyrics, you only need a love of music and a willingness to participate.

Sketch book mixed medai collage and printmaking
karen kosoglad, 1st Semester 2018-19
Art Room #31 : Mon/Wed 8:45-10:10

ART - Printmaking / 0.5

Facilitate and introduce a variety Arts Medium with a focus on sketch books. students will collage and learn printmaking techniques and produce individual portfolios. Exploration of a diverse approach to printmaking through, mono prints, collographs, linoleum block, dry point, silk screen, reduction prints, 3 color blocks and image transfers. Through a combination of many printing techniques students can combine and alter their final images..

Slow Time Outside
karen kosoglad, 1st Semester 2018-19
Rooms 202 (Adam's) and 218 (Karen's) : Mon/Wed 14:35-16:00

ART - Art Survey / 0.25

  • This course is co-taught by Karen K. and Adam C.! *

How can we think with our senses? Can we think like a plant, or a stream, or the wind? How can we express the living world through drawing and other artistic media? How can we learn to see, listen, smell, and sense the living world through the practices of art and science?


We will practice drawing as a foundation to seeing the living world. Nature study is a process in seeing, taking visual cues from nature. Drawings are dialogues between shapes, slowing down the process of making in order to see in a new way.


This course will explore the common ground of art and science found in the practice of drawing the living world. Key themes and skills include: field observation, learning applications, drawing, use of different media (ink, collage, etc.), the role of imagination in perception, participation, depth.


Assessment will be based upon depth of exploration, participation, and development of understanding based within the course activities and outside research. Students will keep a journal for sketching and writing and also read and reflect upon relevant literature.


Scope and sequence:


I. Getting to know this place.
a. Guiding questions:
i. What is this place?
ii. What lives here?
iii. How does it all connect?
iv. What is the feeling sense of this place?
v. How is this place organized in space and time?
vi. How does this place change over time?
b. Project: weekly field observations, drawings, etc. of a place on or just off of campus, collected into long-term field journal with reflections.


II. Expression of life
a. Guiding questions:
i. How do we practice imagination in support of perception?
ii. What does it mean to observe?
iii. What are we able to observe?
iv. How do we express our imagination?
v. How do we use different media in pursuit of expression?
b. Project:
i. Art: Portfolio of an organism: observe, imagine, and express your understanding of and relation to another lifeform using media you have explored in this course.
ii. Science: Diary of an organism: observe, imagine, and research a particular organism, tracking its changes over time and communicating your understanding through words, diagrams, drawings.


III. Final portfolio:
a. Guiding questions:
i. What have you accomplished?
ii. What have you learned?
iii. What are you still pondering?
iv. What are you still struggling over?
v. What will you take with you from this experience?
b. Portfolio:
i. Collected works from the semester
ii. Written reflection on above questions

Fine Arts / Science

Summer Independent Contracts
Adam Croft, 1st Semester 2018-19
the world at large

None assigned

learning objectives dependent upon particular student’s inquiry

Yes, and...
Julia Reade, 1st Semester 2018-19
Vida Room 208

ART - Theatre 1/Acting / 0.5

Improv and art games. This class will be in two parts: weekly improve workshops with Action Faction (an improve school for nuero-divergent learners) and visual art workshops hosted by Vida. The joining theme will be participatory, process focused, student-centered curriculum.

Health

Gender Tea (with books)
Eyva Winet, 1st Semester 2018-19
Sanctuary B20 : Fri 13:50-14:30; Wed 13:50-14:30

UE - Personal Growth / 0.25

Gender Tea
Is the gender binary getting you down? How about the gender hierarchy? Tired of other people telling you what your identity is or should be or that your doing it wrong? Want to drink tea and chat with other rad people who want to talk about gender, sex and sexuality in a safe and supportive space? Want to imagine space where all bodies are safe, free and celebrated? Want to work toward creating that here and now? Everyone is welcome and encouraged to come as long as you can agree to the safety norms grown in the group.

We will also be reading books this semester. Talk to Eyva about Health or other kinds of credit.

Health
Julia Reade, 1st Semester 2018-19
Julia Room 208 : Mon/Wed 12:20-13:45

HE - Health Education HS / 0.5

Together, we will investigate the following health topics, decentering white narratives and centering the stories and experiences of marginalized groups. Students will follow their individual inquiry more deeply into related subtopics to create a project that communicates their research.

1. Wellness
2. Safety
3. Sexual Health
4. Social Emotional Health
5. Substance Abuse and Misuse
6. Nutrition

Health
Susan Barth, 1st Semester 2018-19
Room #B3 : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:15-11:40

HE - Health Education HS / 0.5

We will be exploring deep meaning and connections within your physical, mental and social well being and how to relate them to yourself, those close to you and your local and global communities. You will gain holistic understanding of how to recognize when aspects of your health are out of balance, how to create safe practices surrounding your health and the choices you make. We will explore what is needed to keep your body, identity and community healthy. We will work on positive goal setting around your health and aspects that may affect it. You will create ways in which you can empower yourself in your own health and take positive action.

Language Arts

Blog Your Heart Out
Debbie Kuttner, 1st Semester 2018-19
Debbie's Room 220 : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

LA - Journalism Writing / 0.5

There is an art to writing for yourself. Some call it narrative essay, some call it blogging, or journalling or sometimes it’s just about getting your ideas out there onto the interwebs and sharing your thoughts about music, movies, books, video games, politics, art, etc. In this class students will learn how to communicate ideas to an audience. There will be opportunities for writing reviews, interviews, research, and narratives. Some students will step up to be peer editors, some to work on the technical side (wordpress is our platform); some students will choose to write weekly columns, or to be investigative reporters. We will make decisions as a community of learners, perhaps tying ourselves directly with committees or other Nova/community entities (like facilitating a space for the PTSA, coor groups, Douglas Truth library, and more).

Check out novaknows.com and come and make it more of what it is, or something completely different.

Books of Many Colors
The Dark Knight Batman, 1st Semester 2018-19
Room 102 : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

None assigned

CELL PHONES WILL NOT BE ALLOWED IN THIS CLASS. IF YOU CAN’T DEAL WITH THAT DO NOT TAKE THE CLASS. YOU WILL BE MARKED ABSENT IF YOU TAKE IT OUT. AFTER SEVEN ABSENCES YOUR POSSIBLE CREDIT WILL BE CUT IN HALF.

YOU WILL HAVE TO READ OR LISTEN TO BOOKS IN THIS CLASS.

THIS CLASS WILL HELP YOU MAKE PROGRESS TOWARD READING THE 40 BOOKS REQUIRED FOR YOUR PORTFOLIO AND PROVIDE YOU THE POSSIBILITY OF COMPLETING ALL THE BOOK PROJECTS YOU NEED FOR IT AS WELL.

I have so many amazing books by authors of color that go unread by Nova students every year. At the end of last year the books cried out that they were lonely, that they wanted to give their stories to the students, that they wanted to be held and loved.
So, here is their and your chance to not only read authors of color but some of the greatest authors in the world, or that this world has EVER known.

Here are just some of the great choices:
The Autobiography of Malolm X
Love Medicine
Bailey’s Cafe
Sula
The Bluest Eye
House of the Spirits
Eva Luna
Mamma Day
If Beale Street Could Talk
Another Country
The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven
Tracks
The Kitchen God’s Wife
Like Water for Chocolate
Exit West (I am trying to get copies of this amazing book by Moshin Hamid)
And on and on and on…There are just so many!!!!

We will create reading groups and you will also choose at least one book to read on your own. We will have conversations about our books and do projects on them.

Please know this: ANY READING LEVEL IS WELCOME IN THIS CLASS. YOU JUST HAVE TO BE WILLING TO EITHER READ OR LISTEN TO THE BOOKS. I CAN WORK WITH YOU IN A HUNDRED WAYS TO GET BOOKS TO YOU.
We will do some reading in every class. In addition, you will work hard at learning how to gain deeper insights into the books you read by understanding how authors use symbolism and theme.

If you love reading, are interested in doing it, want to get better at it, want to read books by some of the greatest authors of color (and authors period) on the planet then take this class.

Freshfolks
The Dark Knight Batman, 1st Semester 2018-19
102 : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

LA - 9A Intro to LIT & COMP / 0.5

This class can only being considered for LA 9A.

WARNING: THERE WILL BE NO CELL PHONES ALLOWED IN THIS CLASS. IF YOU CAN’T DEAL WITH THAT IT IS GOING TO BE A LONG SEMESTER. IF YOU TAKE A CELL PHONE DURING CLASS WITHOUT PRIOR PERMISSION FROM YOUR COORDINATOR YOU WILL BE MARKED AS ABSENT FOR THE DAY. AT YOUR 7TH ABSENCE YOU WILL LOSE HALF OF YOUR CREDIT.

This Freshfolks class is designed to orient and introduce you to how Nova works and what language arts classes are like here. As the course title suggest, we hope to move from inquiry (how to pose inquiry and to take ownership over your learning) to understanding (understanding Nova norms and inquiry-based approach to teaching and learning). During the class you will read stories, a novel, watch films and documentaries, and practice your philosophical, writing, and communication skills. You will write an essay, a research paper, and at least one piece of creative writing (a story or poem). You will also do a book project (not report).
Additionally, as you experiment with writing in different genres, you will learn something about analyzing a text (i.e., a story, poem, film, or image) and how to give an account of how something means what it does (or what you think it does). Students in this course will be encouraged to read and reflect on their own ideas and experiences and then examine these ideas in relation to the films and other texts we read and analyze together.

Our goal for the semester will be to read, write, think, and discuss things that matter most to us. In other words, we want to find things we care about and then talk and write about them together. We will strive to develop an inquiry community where we can respectfully share, discuss, and critique our ideas and the ideas of others. We will push each other to think carefully about our beliefs and assumptions about the world as well as how we’ve come to understand the world and ourselves in particular ways. With an eye toward these ends, students will engage in daily, meaningful reading, writing, speaking, and listening tasks in English class and at home.

Essential Questions:

•What makes you who you are?
•What is a community?
•What is the role of an individual in a community?
•How do communities shape individuals? How do individuals impact communities?
•What do individuals sacrifice in order to participate in a community? What do they gain?
•How do different cultures view the roles of individuals and communities?

Overview:

Who are you? How does your community shape you, and how do you impact your community? What do we gain by participating in communities, and what do we give up? In this class, we will build the foundation of our language arts education at Nova through an exploration of the individual and community. As we read novels, poems and nonfiction texts; write creative and analytical responses and watch films we will consider big questions about ourselves and the world we live in.

Freshfolks - Why School?
Allison Sterrett, 1st Semester 2018-19
209 : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

LA - 9A Intro to LIT & COMP / 0.5

Freshfolks serves as an introduction for ninth graders new to the Nova community. Together we’ll explore how our unique school works, develop an understanding of inquiry and how you can take ownership of your learning, and practice foundational language arts skills that will serve you for the rest of your Nova experience.

In this section, we will explore the questions, “what is the purpose of school?” and “who decides (and ought to decide) that purpose?”. Through discussions, reading both fiction and nonfiction, watching films, and digging into our personal histories and the history of our nation, we will develop new understandings of what school has been and what school could be.

Have you ever felt that school should be different? Welcome. We’re looking forward to hearing your voice.

Fries Au Fore
Debbie Kuttner, 1st Semester 2018-19
Rm 220 - Debbie's Room : Mon/Wed/Fri 14:35-16:00

Electives / 0.5; LA - 10B World LIT & COMP / 0.5

We will take a look at all kinds of learning in this class. Reading with our ears and eyes, we will look at the gifts of ADD, ADHD, dyslexia, dysgraphia, dyscalculia, as well as depression and anxiety and how they effect learning. We will also look at multiple intelligences. As an inquiry-based seminar-styled place of learning, we will explore what and how we want to learn together beyond my initial ideas. So bring your questions, frustrations and joys about learning and come ready to learn about yourself and others.
For LA9a-10b credit you will show evidence of reading and responses as well as multiple forms of writing.
If you already have LA9a-10b credit, you can earn elective LA credit for this class.
You must have the permission of your coordinator or Debbie to sign up for this class.

Nanowrimo
Melissa Park, 1st Semester 2018-19
Melissa's room, Moon 101 : Mon/Wed/Fri 14:35-16:00

LA - Creative Writing / 0.5

Na tional No vel Wri ting Mo nth

This is a class for people who like to write, whether you believe yourself to be a good writer or not. The goal is to be able to say at the end that you have written a novel. Students will write a 50,000 word novel in the month of November, and spend the months leading up to November practicing writing skills and looking for a plot line for a full-length novel.

Nanowrimo is an international program, nanowrimo.org . While being in the class does not mean you have to register at the website, it is encouraged.

Nanowrimo will be taught by Nova alum, Beverly Poole, a working theater actor & director, and Jack Darling! The class meets in Melissa’s room (as will signups for the class on Mon 9/10).

Every November, an international community of writers come together digitally to write a 50,000 word novel for National Novel Writing Month. There are tears, there is sweat, there are a lot of adjectives, and at the end of this wild, seat-of-your-pants creative writing journey, there will be a novel that didn’t exist before. In this class we will work up to the month of November by discussing plot outlining, character making, inspiration, and more. During the month of November, we will write, write, write! Have an idea for a novel that you’ve always wanted to write? Great! Have no idea what story you want to tell? No problem! We’ll figure everything out in class. See you there!

Playwriting
Susan Watters, 1st Semester 2018-19
Dance Room : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:15-11:40

LA - Creative Writing / 0.5

Young Playwrights Program (YPP) sponsored by ACT Theatre. Facilitator: K. Brian Neel

This playwriting class will equip you with tools for creative self-expression, endowing self-confidence and the sense that ideas—about yourself, the world, and the challenges you face—matter. Your voice will be heard. All aspects of writing for the theater will be explored, including character, story, conflict, genre, driving action through dialogue, and the power of the unspoken word. There will be much improvisation and game-play. We will write quickly and fearlessly in an atmosphere of risk taking, with positive and constructive feedback.

Students in this class can receive either LA-Creative Writing credit or FA-Theatre 8/Playwriting credit.

Poetry
Melissa Park, 1st Semester 2018-19
Melissa's room, Moon 101 : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:20-13:45

LA - Poetry / 0.5

There is no way out of a spiritual battle
There is no way you can avoid taking sides
There is no way you can not have a poetics
no matter what you do…

-Diane di Prima, “Rant”/“Revolutionary Letter #75”

This is a class about the power of language to heal, to incite, to inform, to describe, to express feelings. It has two main goals: to practice/learn how to read poetry for meaning and purpose, and to write your own poems. Improving one’s writing requires that one reads A LOT and develops/maintains a regular and/or daily practice of writing.

NO CELL PHONES ARE ALLOWED IN THE CLASS. SERIOUSLY. DO NOT SIGN UP FOR THIS CLASS IF YOU CAN’T HANDLE THIS. (You will be marked absent if your phone is out during class.)

ATTENDANCE: For 0.5 credit, students can miss up to six classes (excused or unexcused) until they need to complete projects to make up for the lost hours not in class. If students don’t make up this time they are only eligible for a maximum of 0.25 credit until they do.

Earning full credit includes turning in a portfolio of 16 original poems written this semester AND a portfolio of 20 written analyses of poems (you will have lots of time in class to do these). Students will also be in charge of leading one seminar in front of the class that lasts 15-20 minutes.

Expect to read and discuss A LOT of poems to explore a range of how poets in different places and eras have used language to describe the “unsayable” in their lives. We’ll work on developing an ear and feel for the music, tone, and rhythm in others’ poetry and our own. We’ll do writing games, exercises from prompts, and experiment with various poetic forms. Taking this class means you’re expected to actively participate in building and sustaining a writing community—one that cultivates sincerity, respect for others, mindfulness, and really listening.

We’ll do ‘poetry field trips’ to read and write outdoors and/or in different settings, and co-create a group poetry project that could look like hosting an open mic or poetry reading at or away from school, or a class poetry ’zine or cd, or something else entirely. Look forward to awesome guest poets and workshops. Students are also encouraged to participate in Youth Speaks Seattle writing circles, open mics, local slams, and Spoken Word Committee on Fridays.

Senior Literature and Composition
Debbie Kuttner, 1st Semester 2018-19
Rm 220 - Debbie's room : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:15-11:40

LA - 12A Comparative Lit & Comp / 0.5; LA - 12B Comparative Lit & Comp / 0.5

In “Senior Literature” this semester we will be reading/viewing a number of works including some or all of the following: Yellow Wallpaper, Binti trilogy, The Poisonwood Bible, Frankenstein,The Color Purple, The Good Earth, Madame Bovary, Their Eyes Were Watching God, Oedipus Rex, Jasmine, Our Town. There will be a long list of supplementary reading for people who choose to read more. There will requirements for writings and book projects. This will constitute .5 literature credit.
Students who take this class must be seniors or juniors, or have permission of instructor.
In the and Composition component there is a requirement to write a well-researched essay of length (12-15 pages) and this coursework can fulfill the graduation requirement of a research paper. Students will also work on perfecting the 500 word narrative essay which can be used for college applications as well as the senior essay requirement.
Students will be expected to already have knowledge and experience with all forms of essay: thesis statements, transitions, dialogue; introduction, body, and conclusions; and also, the stages of writing: pre-writing, graphic organizers, drafting, self revisions, peer revisions, editing and polishing. The purpose of this class is to enhance and hone these skills through practice with writing, reading, peer editing, and class seminars. This class will have a heavy emphasis on creating a writers’ community and developing/individualizing one’s own expectations/requirements. Students will seminar an essay of their choosing. This will constitute an additional .5 LA credit for composition.

Studio Ghibli
Debbie Kuttner, 1st Semester 2018-19
Rm 220 - Debbie's : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

LA - 10B World LIT & COMP / 0.5

We will watch four or more films from Studio Ghibli, including but not limited to Princess Mononoke, Naussica of the Valley of the Wind, and Spirited Away. We will discuss, analyze, evaluate, and find joy in the films and then produce work reflective of our experiences intellectual and heartfelt. The four products from this class will include one project, one essay, and one creative writing. Each product will go through a drafting phase.

Summer - Meesh
Michelle Vecchio, SUMMER 2018

None assigned

The Good Death
The Dark Knight Batman, 1st Semester 2018-19
Room 102 : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

None assigned

YOU WILL HAVE TO GET A PERMISSION SLIP SIGNED BY YOU AND YOUR PARENT/GUARDIAN TO SIGN-UP FOR THIS CLASS. YOU CAN OBTAIN THIS FROM TERRANCE. AGAIN, I WILL NOT ALLOW YOU TO SIGN-UP FOR THIS CLASS WITHOUT A COMPLETED PERMISSION SLIP.

PLEASE READ THE TRIGGER WARNINGS BELOW. PLEASE DO NOT TAKE THIS CLASS IF YOU ARE SUICIDAL, HAVE INTENSE PROBLEMS WITH DISSOCIATION, DEPRESSION, OR OTHER MENTAL DISORDERS THAT COULD BE ADVERSELY AFFECTED BY TALKING ABOUT DEATH, CANNOT HAVE COMPASSION FOR OTHER HUMANS, CANNOT ALLOW OTHERS TO EITHER BE OR NOT BE RELIGIOUS OR SPIRITUAL OR ATHEISTIC OR AGNOSTIC, OR STRUGGLE TO PROVIDE PEOPLE SPACE TO EXPLORE WHAT THEY BELIEVE OR DON’T UNDERSTAND.

TRIGGER WARNINGS (Please read): Clearly, we will be talking about death. Death comes in many forms so we will be discussing those as well – suicide, violence, etc. We will be talking about different types of reality, meaning, and belief systems. We will explore the physical manifestation in the body of death and the burial/death rituals of many different cultures. This will involve in some cases visuals of the dead and perhaps blood or other viscera.

CELL PHONES WILL NOT BE ALLOWED IN THIS CLASS. IF YOU CAN’T DEAL WITH THAT DO NOT TAKE THE CLASS. YOU WILL BE MARKED ABSENT IF YOU TAKE IT OUT. AFTER SEVEN ABSENCES YOUR POSSIBLE CREDIT WILL BE CUT IN HALF.

Okay, now for the description.

This class is important.

You live in a country that has a very overt fear of death. So much so that it is both trivialized, exploited, and not spoken of all at the same time.

So, I want to boldly start a conversation and an exploration into death.

We will explore what this fear has created in both this culture and you (if anything). You will deeply explore what you think/feel about death while you hear from your peers what they think and feel as well. You will research other cultures so you can get an idea of how these cultures treat death and the dead. We will hear from doctors about what actually happens to the body when it dies. I am trying to get an undertaker to come in and talk with you all about their job. We will also mediate in this class on death as well as life. We will look at poetry, stories, art, film, and so much more on the subject of death. We will examine grief as much as we examine love.

Your responsibility will be to try and be there while all this happens.
Your responsibility will be to work hard to discover what you believe.
You also have the responsibility to engage in the work of trying to discover what it means to you to have a good death and then take on the grail quest to deliver these revelations back to your classmates through a presented project.

You will write an essay, a short research paper, keep a journal, write reflections, learn about dreams and interpreting them, and do multiple projects throughout the course of this class.

We will read texts and look at how literature uses the dead, speaks of the dead, teaches us about dying.
We will watch films to see visuals of how death is taught, or not taught.

Your responsibility is to listen to your peers and do everything you can to learn from them and be compassionate.
Your ultimate responsibility is to become human and perhaps this is a good start.

The Good Life
The Dark Knight Batman, 1st Semester 2018-19
Room 102 : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:15-11:40

None assigned

CELL PHONES WILL NOT BE ALLOWED IN THIS CLASS. IF YOU CAN’T DEAL WITH THAT DO NOT TAKE THE CLASS. YOU WILL BE MARKED ABSENT IF YOU TAKE IT OUT. AFTER SEVEN ABSENCES YOUR POSSIBLE CREDIT WILL BE CUT IN HALF.

TRIGGER WARNINGS (PLEASE READ!): Since we are talking about life we will also be talking about death. We will also talk about suicide (and the philosophical reasons around not doing it).

This is a class to try and uncover what it would look like to live a “good” life. In order to so this we will be examining the lives of others through their stories, poetry, films, art, etc. You will be responsible for interviewing several people and giving presentations on your findings. In this way, you will have the chance to hear a large variety of possible ways to live a good life. You will write short reflections, an essay, do a couple projects, and be responsible for reading one autobiography of your choice. Finally, you will be responsible for a final project presentation that details the hows and whys of what you believe, after going through this class, is the way to live a good life.

Women in Film & Literature
Debbie Kuttner, 2nd Semester 2017-18
Rm 220 - Debbie's room : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

LA - 12B Comparative Lit & Comp / 0.5

In this version of “Senior/Junior Literature” this semester we will be reading/viewing a number of works that depict fictional women created by women, men and others. Our novels will include some of the following: The Poisonwood Bible, The Color Purple, The Good Earth, Sula, Madame Bovary, Jasmine, Their Eyes Were Watching God. We will also look at women depicted in film, and may choose to watch some or all of the following: Strangers in Good Company, Set it Off, La Femme Nikita, Nausicaa Valley of the Wind, Spirited Away, Passion Fish, Mississippi Masala, Trans America, Babette’s Feast, He Loves Me/He Loves Me Not, and others. We may also choose to read some essays and short stories by authors like Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Alice Walker, Helene Cixous, Audre Lorde, and more. Come prepared to read, listen and watch a lot of stories! and to discuss and write about them.

Language Arts / Social Studies

Black Studies: WH/LA
Melissa Park, 1st Semester 2018-19
Melissa's room, Moon 101 : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:15-11:40

LA - 11B Amer LIT & COMP / 0.5; SS - World History 3 / 0.5

NO CELL PHONES ARE ALLOWED IN THE CLASS. SERIOUSLY. DO NOT SIGN UP FOR THIS CLASS IF YOU CAN’T HANDLE THIS. (You will be marked absent if your phone is out during class.)

The construct of Blackness as a racial category is a distinctly American one. What is Blackness? What does it mean to be Black? Who is Black in this country? What are the experiences of “Black people” in the African diaspora? What is post-Blackness? We are excited to engage with these starting questions (and generate more with the class) through reading, analyzing, and responding to selections from novels, short stories, poetry, comics, plays, essays, films, music, and nonfiction across a wide range of time periods, places, experiences, and genres.

EXPECT TO COMPLETE HOMEWORK OUTSIDE OF CLASS EVERY WEEK TO BE ON-TRACK FOR FULL CREDIT. Students wanting to earn world history credit will work on history-focused assignments, complementary to/different than those focused on earning LA credit.

ATTENDANCE: For each 0.5 credit, students can miss up to six classes (excused or unexcused) until they need to complete projects to make up for the lost hours not in class. For each 0.5 credit, if students don’t make up this time they are only eligible for a maximum of 0.25 credit until they do.

Ethnic Studies WH
Gabriella Sanchez-Stern, 1st Semester 2018-19
Cloud 221 - Sanchez : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

LA / 0.5; WHist / 0.5

Intro to Ethnic Studies is a world history class focusing on the experiences of peoples around the world who’ve played/continue to play critical roles in shaping the modern world, yet whose experiences and perspectives are frequently absent from and/or distorted by mainstream narratives of world history.

We will unpack what are dominant narratives—what they do, and why/how they persist—and work to uncover, analyze, and reconcile with counter narratives to broaden our understandings of how the past continues to shape the present (e.g., to determine why and how things change and/or stay the same for various peoples and the planet). Race/ethnicity, gender, class, power, and culture are primary lenses we’ll work with to research complex historic events. We will study interesting cases in the last 500 years in and outside of the US through thematic units on [tentatively:] colonialism and imperialism, immigration and migration, and liberation and decolonization.

EXPECT TO COMPLETE HOMEWORK OUTSIDE OF CLASS EVERY WEEK TO BE ON-TRACK FOR FULL CREDIT. Students wanting to earn world history credit will work on history-focused assignments, complementary to/different than those focused on earning LA credit.

ATTENDANCE: For each 0.5 credit, students can miss up to six classes (excused or unexcused) until they need to complete projects to make up for the lost hours not in class. For each 0.5 credit, if students don’t make up this time they are only eligible for a maximum of 0.25 credit until they do.

Ethnic Studies WH/LA
Melissa Park, 1st Semester 2018-19
Melissa's room, Moon 101 : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

LA - 11B Amer LIT & COMP / 0.5; SS - World History 3 / 0.5

NO CELL PHONES ARE ALLOWED IN THE CLASS. SERIOUSLY. DO NOT SIGN UP FOR THIS CLASS IF YOU CAN’T HANDLE THIS. (You will be marked absent if your phone is out during class.)

Intro to Ethnic Studies is a world history class focusing on the experiences of peoples around the world who’ve played/continue to play critical roles in shaping the modern world, yet whose experiences and perspectives are frequently absent from and/or distorted by mainstream narratives of world history.

We will unpack what are dominant narratives—what they do, and why/how they persist—and work to uncover, analyze, and reconcile with counter narratives to broaden our understandings of how the past continues to shape the present (e.g., to determine why and how things change and/or stay the same for various peoples and the planet). Race/ethnicity, gender, class, power, and culture are primary lenses we’ll work with to research complex historic events. We will study interesting cases in the last 500 years in and outside of the US through thematic units on [tentatively:] colonialism and imperialism, immigration and migration, and liberation and decolonization.

EXPECT TO COMPLETE HOMEWORK OUTSIDE OF CLASS EVERY WEEK TO BE ON-TRACK FOR FULL CREDIT. Students wanting to earn world history credit will work on history-focused assignments, complementary to/different than those focused on earning LA credit.

ATTENDANCE: For each 0.5 credit, students can miss up to six classes (excused or unexcused) until they need to complete projects to make up for the lost hours not in class. For each 0.5 credit, if students don’t make up this time they are only eligible for a maximum of 0.25 credit until they do.

Mathematics

Algebra 1A
Lydia Wynn, 1st Semester 2018-19
207 - Winnie's Room : Tue/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

MA - Algebra 1A / 0.5

This is the first semester of Algebra I. This course is appropriate for any students who are interested in taking it, regardless of whether they feel confident in math or not. In addition to learning the fundamentals of algebra, we’ll be devoting weekly class time to developing number sense, mathematical inquiry skills, and pattern recognition. Additional support time is available outside of class for students who would like additional help or more advanced challenges.

This class will cover 5 areas:
1. Numbers and Properties
2. Variables and Equations
3. Intro to Functions
4. Linear Functions
5. Linear Functions, Part II

In addition to the mathematics content, students are expected to

  • listen with respect to another person’s explanation;
  • provide help when asked;
  • ask for help when needed;
  • play an active role in sustaining a safe and encouraging learning space for one another; and
  • treat all materials gently so that they may be reused.

Algebra 2A
Lydia Wynn, 1st Semester 2018-19
207 - Winnie's Room : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:20-13:45

MA - Algebra 2A / 0.5; MA - Algebra 2A H / 0.5

Algebra 2 is a stepping stone in the general sequence of mathematics classes. To be taken after Algebra 1 and Geometry, Algebra 2 begins to explore the deeper patterns found in functions and other representations of relationships. Algebra 2 is really about forming solid connections between the Algebra 1 work, Geometry work, and the world around you. Our first goal will be to build up confidence in working with problem solving, mathematical modelling, and function analysis and recognition. Then we will move in to an introductory exploration of probability and statistics, systems of equations in 3-variables, and trigonometry.

Algebra 2A Morning
Lydia Wynn, 1st Semester 2018-19
207 - Winnie's Room : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

MA - Algebra 2A / 0.5; MA - Algebra 2A H / 0.5

Algebra 2 is a stepping stone in the general sequence of mathematics classes. To be taken after Algebra 1 and Geometry, Algebra 2 begins to explore the deeper patterns found in functions and other representations of relationships. Algebra 2 is really about forming solid connections between the Algebra 1 work, Geometry work, and the world around you. Our first goal will be to build up confidence in working with problem solving, mathematical modelling, and function analysis and recognition. Then we will move in to an introductory exploration of probability and statistics, systems of equations in 3-variables, and trigonometry.

Algebra A
Michael Hodapp, 1st Semester 2018-19
Room 105 : Mon/Wed 12:20-13:45

MA - Algebra 1A / 0.5

This is the first semester of Algebra I. This course is appropriate for any students who are interested in taking it, regardless of whether they feel confident in math or not. In addition to learning the fundamentals of algebra, we’ll be devoting weekly class time to developing number sense, mathematical inquiry skills, and pattern recognition. Additional support time is available outside of class for students who would like additional help or more advanced challenges.

This class will cover 5 areas:
1. Numbers and Properties
2. Variables and Equations
3. Intro to Functions
4. Linear Functions
5. Linear Functions, Part II

In addition to the mathematics content, students are expected to

  • listen with respect to another person’s explanation;
  • provide help when asked;
  • ask for help when needed;
  • play an active role in sustaining a safe and encouraging learning space for one another; and
  • treat all materials gently so that they may be reused.

Calculus A
Michael Hodapp, 1st Semester 2018-19
105 : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

MA - Calculus A / 0.5

This is the first of two semesters of Calculus. This course is appropriate for any student interested in taking it, but they must have taken precalculus. It is a course in differential and integral calculus. Our approach will be inquiry-based and we will focus on both theory and applications. We will treat it as a seminar and learn through textbook readings, discussion, and interesting problems posed by both the facilitator and students. Calculus applications are found everywhere, including physics, chemistry, biology, engineering, economics, and practically anything having to do with “change” in the world!

If students are interested in taking the AP Calculus AB exam at the end of the year, this class can provide them with additional study materials and support towards that end.

Possible topics include (but can be changed depending on student interest):

  • Functions and graphs
  • Rigorous development of limits (including epsilon-delta theory)
  • Continuity
  • Derivatives and differentiability
  • Many applications of differential calculus
  • Curve sketching
  • Related rates (simple differential equations)
  • Implicit differentiation
  • Parametric equations
  • Polar functions
  • Vector functions
  • l’Hopital’s rule
  • Riemann sums
  • Indefinite and definite integrals
  • Applications of integration
  • Fundamental theorem of calculus
  • Numerical approximations to integrals
  • Sequences and series, including convergence and divergence

There will be on the order of 2-4 hours of homework/studying per week. Be prepared to practice your math skills and collaborate on projects. Student who miss more than

In addition to the mathematics content, students are expected to

  • Listen with respect to another person’s explanation
  • Engage in discussion
  • Communicate ideas both informally and formally
  • Provide help when asked
  • Ask for help when needed;
  • Play an active role in sustaining a safe and encouraging learning space for one another
  • Treat all materials gently so that they may be reused.

Celestial Navigation
Christina Wright, 1st Semester 2018-19
Lab 120 : Tue/Thu 14:35-16:00

None assigned

I am offereing a small, dedicated group of students a chance to learn the navigation techniques that were perfected in the 19th century, and which, basically, have not changed. The following is a description of the course by the author of the text we will be using:

“This course covers how to find position at sea from timed sextant sights of the sun, moon, stars, and planets plus other routine and special procedures of safe, efficient offshore navigation. No previous navigation experience is required. The only math involved is arithmetic (adding and subtracting angles and times). This is a practical, how-to-do-it course, which also includes clear explanations of how it works and how to do it well. Plus this course includes other crucial factors of ocean navigation besides just finding out where you are from the stars, such as logbook procedures, dead reckoning, error analysis, route planning, and more. At the end of this course, you will be ready for ocean navigation.”

As a student in this course myself, I have found that it requires considerable frustration tolerance, attention to detail, an ability to keep a sequence of steps clear, and a willingness to learn from mistakes.

The Fine Print: This course is open ONLY to those who have successfully completed Geometry A and B.
This is not a class that deals with astrological phenomena/signs.
While this course is listed as a Mathematics course, it can be used to fulfill CTE requirements as well.

Financial Algebra
Lance Brown, 1st Semester 2018-19
B19 Lance's Room : Tue/Thu 8:45-10:10

MA - Financial Algebra B CTE / 0.5

This course may be taken as mathematics credit (.5) or as CTE credit (.5).

In this class we will alternate between the personal and the general. We will learn the everyday skills adults need to establish a budget, bank, save and borrow money, and pay local and national taxes. At the same time, we will be exploring the finances of the country. Just as we look at our own budgets, we will explore the topic of balancing the federal budget and learn about the issues that surround the federal deficit. As we explore the distinction between “wants” and “needs” in our own budgets, we will examine the choices our own country makes in its military spending. As we explore the way taxes are taken out of paychecks (FICA) we will look at the structure and sustainability of Social Security and Medicare. We will explore income tax models comparing fixed-amount taxation to flat/proportional taxes, to the progressive tax model.

This is a math course for students who learn best by doing. It has been designed for those who “think with their hands” and who like to use math in real situations from the get go. We will do many labs and short term projects in this course. In addition to the math, we will be working throughout on problem solving skills, communication skills, and the ability to work on a team, the three attributes employers say are the most important to them.

Geometry A Mon/Wed 10:15-11:40
Lance Brown, 1st Semester 2018-19
B#19 : Mon/Wed 10:15-11:40

MA - Geometry A / 0.5

Geometry A Mon/Wed 12:20-1:45
Lance Brown, 1st Semester 2018-19
B#19 : Mon/Wed 12:20-13:45

MA - Geometry A / 0.5

Introduction to Programming
Akil Srinivasan, 1st Semester 2018-19
Moon 120 - The Laboratory : Tue/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

MA - Math Analysis A / 0.5

Interested in coding? Want to make some cool applications and games? This is an introduction to the engineering of computer applications emphasizing modern software engineering principles: object-oriented design, decomposition, encapsulation, abstraction, and testing. We’ll use the Java programming language.

This is for students completely new or have little experience with programming

The emphasis is on good programming style, built-in facilities of the Java language, and good software design principles (not your average hack jobs!). No prior programming experience required!

Important: You will watch ~45 min lectures on your own and/or read outside of class. To show evidence of learning the background knowledge, you’ll write brief reflections. Time in class will be spent working on coding projects and getting feedback. You have to be ok spending time watching lectures and/or reading on your own!

Credit: Competencies will be shown through 6 programming projects and lecture/reading reflections.
Available for 3rd year math credit, CTE credit, science credit

We will also follow the 8 absence attendance policy, which will help keep you on top of things in this class.

In addition to the programming content, students are expected to

  • Listen with respect to another person’s explanation
  • Engage in discussion
  • Communicate ideas both informally and formally
  • Provide help when asked
  • Ask for help when needed;
  • Play an active role in sustaining a safe and encouraging learning space for one another
  • Treat all materials gently so that they may be reused.

Math League
Michael Hodapp, 1st Semester 2018-19
105 : Tue 14:35-16:00

UE - Student Activity / 0.25

Math League is a space in which students of any level of mathematical experience are welcome. In it, we’ll discuss problem solving strategies, work individually and as teams to work our way through challenging problems, explore interesting mathematical tangents, participate in in-school math competitions, and travel to city-wide math competitions.

Pre Calculus
Lydia Wynn, 1st Semester 2018-19
207 - Winnie's Room : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

MA - Pre-Calculus A / 0.5; MA - Pre-Calculus A H / 0.5

Pre Calculus Learning Objectives

A chance to take mathematics to a whole new level. Using prior mathematics learning (Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2) as a foundation, we are going to explore how math can apply to your world with an introductory Calculus lens. From working with functions as a descriptor of relationships and change, to developing connections between triangles, circles, and functions (trigonometry). We will open our minds to the language that is used to describe the patterns of the world and strengthen your comfort towards working with mathematical notation, graphical representation, and manipulation.

Experience in Algebra 1, Geometry, and Algebra 2 is highly encouraged as they represent the foundation of what we do in Pre Calculus. Complete mastery is not necessary, however genuine effort and honest question asking are welcomed! Please come to class with an open mind about where mathematics can take you in the world.

SBAC Bootcamp and Collection Of Evidence (COE)
Lance Brown, 1st Semester 2018-19
B19 Lance's Room : Tue/Thu 12:20-13:45

MA - COE I / 0.5; MA - COE II / 0.5

This course is for SENIORS who have not passed the State’s Math End of Course(EOC) exam at least twice and are planning on graduating this spring. This course is designed to replace a regular math class in the student’s schedule and qualifies as a third math credit.

During the first semester of the course, students will work toward completing a collection of evidence(COE) that consists of 6-8 state designed algebra I tasks. Practice tasks will be used to help students prepare and review algebra I skills throughout the semester. The COE will be submitted to the state toward the end of January and they will determine if competency is demonstrated. A successful COE will satisfy the mandatory passing of a math EOC for graduation.

The time slot for this class was chosen carefully. In essence, we will use the three hours to go in depth on the specific standards associated with the first “task” in the portfolio that will be submitted to the state, with the idea of potentially getting through a task a week. Special attention will be paid to our own sanity, with breaks for walks and stretching. But the idea here is to use an extended length of time to study something deeply and then apply that on the state’s tasks shortly thereafter. If a student completes the portfolio in less time than the whole semester (which is very likely with hard work, and less likely with a lack of focus or low attendance) then their time in the course will be complete. Much of the work and study will be more skill-directed than typical inquiry-based math courses at Nova. If the entire semester is necessary for some students that is also doable.

SBAC Bootcamp and Collection Of Evidence (COE)
Akil Srinivasan, 1st Semester 2018-19
Moon 120 - The Laboratory : Tue/Thu 12:20-13:45

MA - COE I / 0.5; MA - COE II / 0.5

This course is for SENIORS who have not passed the State’s Math SBAC exam and are planning on graduating this spring. This is for graduating seniors that need to sit for the SBAC re-take in Oct/Nov. If you pass, you’ll be done with the class! If not, we have the rest of the semester to do the collection of evidence (COE) process below. This course is designed to replace a regular math class in the student’s schedule and qualifies as a third math credit.

During the first semester of the course, students will work toward completing a collection of evidence(COE) that consists of 6-8 state designed algebra I tasks. Practice tasks will be used to help students prepare and review algebra I skills throughout the semester. The COE will be submitted to the state toward the end of January and they will determine if competency is demonstrated. A successful COE will satisfy the mandatory passing of a math SBAC for graduation.

Physical Education

Bombardment Society
The Dark Knight Batman, 1st Semester 2018-19
Garfield Community Center : Fri 13:50-14:30

PE - Individual/Dual Activity 1 / 0.25

This class can be Individual/Dual Activity 1.

Students will develop eye hand coordination and learn teamwork through the age old game of dodge ball.

Dead Rats XC
Julia Reade, 1st Semester 2018-19
Room 208 : Mon/Wed/Fri 14:35-16:00; Tue/Thu/Fri 13:50-14:30

PE - Lifetime Activities 1 / 0.5

Team:

The team practices daily. M/W/F 2:35pm-4pm T/TH 1:50 to no later than 4pm. Team members are required to attend all practices, meets, and complete any workouts assigned outside of class time but part of the training plan.

Interested in run/walking, but not able to fulfill the team requirements? Enroll in the course and receive PE credit based on your individualized attendance and participation plan. 1-5 day attendance options available.

Don't Trip
Julia Reade, 1st Semester 2018-19
Vida Room 208

PE - Individual/Dual Activity 1 / 0.15

Walking is a great way to de-stress, bring oxygen to your brain and engage in the neighborhood. Students will democratically choose the direction we wander, and leave their phones behind for an experience in the present moment. We’ll bookend our walks with simple gentle stretches.

LGBTQ+ Boxing
Eyva Winet, 1st Semester 2018-19
Cappy's Gym -off campus 5PM

None assigned

PE PE
Julia Reade, 1st Semester 2018-19
Julia's Room 208 : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

PE - Lifetime Activities 1 / 0.5

Why PE? I can promise you it’s about so much more than merely getting the credits to graduate. There are so many wonderful benefits to being active—stress relief, meeting new people, and just plain old feeling awesome! Together, we will explore creative and traditional activities, starting with their histories and centering stories of marginalized people and groups who participate in the sport. In addition to actively participating in the focus activity, we will brainstorm ways to conduct community outreach in an effort to engage others in more physical activity. Be ready to try a variety of activities from hacky sack to strength circuits to hiking. No previous experience in any sport is required, just an open mind and willingness to try.

Science

Beginning Chemistry
Eyva Winet, 1st Semester 2018-19
RM #120 : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:15-11:40

SC - Chemistry 1 / 0.5

This course is an experiential journey through the essential themes, concepts, models, laboratory skills, mathematics and thinking processes that characterize a molecular understanding of the world. This class emphasizes creating a context for chemistry by understanding the history, philosophy, multi-ethnic perspectives, ethics, applications and relevance of chemistry. Chemistry is a study of the atomic theory, the structure of matter, bonding, nuclear chemistry, fuel chemistry, the periodic table, stoichiometry, reaction chemistry, equilibrium, kinetics, oxidation-reduction chemistry and more. These reactions and concepts explain and control the environment, product manufacturing, the human body, scientific arts like photography and ceramics, food, fermentation and combustion! Expect labs, color changes, burning stuff, and fun! We will also discuss pressing chemical issues and chemical ethics. There is math and writing in this course so get ready to use your whole brain!

This class is open to all students who are interested in chemistry. The spring semester chemistry class will require this class as a prerequisite.

Biology
Susan Barth, 1st Semester 2018-19
Susan's RM 3 : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

SC - Biology 1 / 0.5

This class has a base in cell Biology and will cover the fundamentals of the cell. This class will include, inquiry based science, research, modeling of systems and creating projects. You will hone your experimental skills, creating experiments to further your learning and expand your mind. There will be terminology to learn and apply. As a Biologist, you will share your work with your peers and beyond.

Students will be expected to enter their work in the annual SNART Fair.

There will be a minimum of 2 hours of homework/studying per week. Be prepared to practice your study skills or build them if that is new to you. You will be expected to learn and apply study techniques.

This class will be offered for Biological Science credit.

Attendance: This class will follow the 8 absence attendance policy, although you should plan to attend class regularly, which will help keep you on top of things in this class.

Expectations _ You will be expected to show up and contribute to this class. This class will help you prepare for the Bio EOC

Climate Justice
Adam Croft, 1st Semester 2018-19
Room 202 and beyond : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:20-13:45

SC - Science Seminar / 0.5

Our inquiry into climate change and environmental justice will be consistently framed within the context of the continuing historical dynamics of settler-colonialism.

In particular, we will seek to understand and create an ethic of climate justice grounded within scientific and historical understanding. Students will leave the course with a set of questions and understandings to help guide future relations between people and place.

Questions to be addressed by students participating in this course include:
- who is most vulnerable to climate change and related environmental challenges?
- how did these people come to be so vulnerable?
- what is the responsibility of wealthy nations toward poorer nations?
- what could climate justice look like?
- what is my role in enacting climate justice?
- what is the state of the planet and its life today?
- how is health/pollution distributed across the planet today and in this place?
- how has the climate crisis come about?
- how are/will these changes affect(ing) communities differently depending upon race, class, gender, age, sexuality, ability, etc.?
- how are/will these changes affect(ing) plants, animals, ecosystems, oceans, and the living planet (Gaia)?
- what does environmental justice look like in this and other places?
- what does a healthy human civilization living with and upon a healthy planet look like, in this and other places?

Environmental Justice
Adam Croft, 1st Semester 2018-19
Room 202 and beyond : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

SC - Science Seminar / 0.5

Students will explore the relations of human groups and places. In this course, we will question, challenge, analyze, and create the relations between humans and the Earth and how these relations have changed throughout human/Earth history. Most class topics will be determined by the course participants, though we will continue to relate these histories to those of the place within which this course is situated: Seattle, Puget Sound, Washington, Pacific Northwest, North America, …

In particular, we will seek to understand and create an ethic of place. Students will leave the course with a set of questions and understandings to help guide future relations between people and place.


WA State History credit is available for this course.*

Questions to be addressed by students participating in this course include:
- how have humans lived in this and other places?
- how are humans currently living in this and other places?
- how could humans live in this and other places?
- how does the Earth live in this and other places upon the Earth?
- what is the state of the planet and its life today?
- how is health/pollution distributed across the planet today and in this place?
- how has the climate crisis come about, and what is its relation to this place?
- how are/will these changes affect(ing) communities differently depending upon race, class, gender, age, sexuality, ability, etc.?
- how are/will these changes affect(ing) plants, animals, ecosystems, oceans, and the living planet (Gaia)?
- what does environmental justice look like in this and other places?
- what does a healthy human civilization living with and upon a healthy planet look like, in this and other places?

Life on Earth
Adam Croft, 2nd Semester 2017-18
Room 202 and beyond : Tue/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

SC - Biology 2 / 0.5

Students will explore the science and history of life on Earth. Students will be expected to develop a broad understanding of the dynamics of life on Earth while also taking on an inquiry and teaching project exploring a particular aspect of Earth’s life. This course will also prepare students for half of the Biology EOC competencies.

Scope and sequence:

I. What is life? How do we answer such a question? [research, classify, design]
a. Zones of exploration
i. Definition of life;
ii. Requirements for life;
iii. Classification of life.
b. Project: Design a viable creature.

II. How do organisms live together? How do we study these interactions? [research, observe, design, experiment]
a. Zones of exploration
i. Ecological relations;
ii. Human-induced changes.
b. Project: Design and conduct a field study.

III. How do organisms change over time? How do we know? [research, scheme]
a. Zones of exploration
i. Evolution by natural selection;
ii. Examples of evolution;
iii. Human evolution.
b. Project: Plausible evolution of creature.

IV. Biology EOC: practice and review

V. Final portfolio:
a. Guiding questions:
i. What have you accomplished?
ii. What have you learned?
iii. What are you still pondering?
iv. What are you still struggling over?
v. What will you take with you from this experience?
b. Portfolio:
i. Collected works from the semester
ii. Written reflection on above questions

Life on Earth
Adam Croft, 1st Semester 2018-19
Room 202 and beyond : Tue/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

SC - Biology 2 / 0.5

Students will explore the science and history of life on Earth. Students will be expected to develop a broad understanding of the dynamics of life on Earth while also taking on an inquiry and teaching project exploring a particular aspect of Earth’s life. This course will also prepare students for half of the Biology EOC competencies.

Scope and sequence:

I. What is life? How do we answer such a question? [research, classify, design]
a. Zones of exploration
i. Definition of life;
ii. Requirements for life;
iii. Classification of life.
b. Project: Design a viable creature.

II. How do organisms live together? How do we study these interactions? [research, observe, design, experiment]
a. Zones of exploration
i. Ecological relations;
ii. Human-induced changes.
b. Project: Design and conduct a field study.

III. How do organisms change over time? How do we know? [research, scheme]
a. Zones of exploration
i. Evolution by natural selection;
ii. Examples of evolution;
iii. Human evolution.
b. Project: Plausible evolution of creature.

IV. Biology EOC: practice and review

V. Final portfolio:
a. Guiding questions:
i. What have you accomplished?
ii. What have you learned?
iii. What are you still pondering?
iv. What are you still struggling over?
v. What will you take with you from this experience?
b. Portfolio:
i. Collected works from the semester
ii. Written reflection on above questions

Lions, Tigers and Bears, OH MY!
Susan Barth, 1st Semester 2018-19
Susan's RM 3 : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

SC - Biology 1 / 0.5

Come and save the world. Explore ecosystems and how they interact. Learn about the human impact on the planet and our effect on organisms like lions, tigers and bears. What will your role be? How will you work to save the planet? In this class you will create positive change and lead others to do the same. We will be creating Eco justice/Social Justice projects in this class. We will explore ways that people are giving back and join them. Come be a part of the change.

Mycology
Michael Hodapp, 1st Semester 2018-19
105

SC - Science Seminar / 0.25

In this class, students will learn about the morphology, ecology, and classifications of mushrooms. Students will practice skills related to observation and documentation in the field. They’ll participate in events help by the Puget Sound Mycological Society and go on numerous self-directed field experiences.

Physics Intensive, part one and part two
Akil Srinivasan, 1st Semester 2018-19
Moon 120 - The Laboratory : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:20-16:00

SC - Physics 1 / 0.5; SC - Physics 2 / 0.5

This is a combined Physics 1 and Physics 2 intensive that meets everyday from 12:20 to 1:45 and 2:35 to 4:00. There will be math, labs, research projects and physics seminars. If you hate these things this is not the class for you. If you like theories of the universe, time travel, questions of reality and perception, energy, movement, matter and MATH, then this is the class for you.

If you have not finished at least 2 years of high school equivalent math – Algebra 1 and Geometry – then you and your coordinator need to check in with Akil before enrolling. You should be taking Algebra 2A or higher math at the same time If you are super excited about physics you can still take this class without the math pre-req but you may be asked to commit to out of class tutoring or studying on your own.

Slow Time Outside
Adam Croft, 1st Semester 2018-19
Rooms 202 (Adam's) and 218 (Karen's) : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

SC - Science Seminar / 0.5

  • This course is co-taught by Karen K. and Adam C.! *

How can we think with our senses? Can we think like a plant, or a stream, or the wind? How can we express the living world through drawing and other artistic media? How can we learn to see, listen, smell, and sense the living world through the practices of art and science?


We will practice drawing as a foundation to seeing the living world. Nature study is a process in seeing, taking visual cues from nature. Drawings are dialogues between shapes, slowing down the process of making in order to see in a new way.


This course will explore the common ground of art and science found in the practice of drawing the living world. Key themes and skills include: field observation, learning applications, drawing, use of different media (ink, collage, etc.), the role of imagination in perception, participation, depth.


Assessment will be based upon depth of exploration, participation, and development of understanding based within the course activities and outside research. Students will keep a journal for sketching and writing and also read and reflect upon relevant literature.


Scope and sequence:


I. Getting to know this place.
a. Guiding questions:
i. What is this place?
ii. What lives here?
iii. How does it all connect?
iv. What is the feeling sense of this place?
v. How is this place organized in space and time?
vi. How does this place change over time?
b. Project: weekly field observations, drawings, etc. of a place on or just off of campus, collected into long-term field journal with reflections.


II. Expression of life
a. Guiding questions:
i. How do we practice imagination in support of perception?
ii. What does it mean to observe?
iii. What are we able to observe?
iv. How do we express our imagination?
v. How do we use different media in pursuit of expression?
b. Project:
i. Art: Portfolio of an organism: observe, imagine, and express your understanding of and relation to another lifeform using media you have explored in this course.
ii. Science: Diary of an organism: observe, imagine, and research a particular organism, tracking its changes over time and communicating your understanding through words, diagrams, drawings.


III. Final portfolio:
a. Guiding questions:
i. What have you accomplished?
ii. What have you learned?
iii. What are you still pondering?
iv. What are you still struggling over?
v. What will you take with you from this experience?
b. Portfolio:
i. Collected works from the semester
ii. Written reflection on above questions

Social Studies

AGE
Melissa Park, 1st Semester 2018-19
Melissa's room, Moon 101 : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

SS - American Government & Economics / 0.5

NO CELL PHONES ARE ALLOWED IN THE CLASS. SERIOUSLY. DO NOT SIGN UP FOR THIS CLASS IF YOU CAN’T HANDLE THIS. (You will be marked absent if your phone is out during class.)

AGE (American Government & Economics) is a one-semester class for juniors and seniors, and is required of all students for graduation. In it, we work to build “toolkits” for understanding how we effect, and are affected by, public policies and systems in American society, both historically and currently.

We’ll examine the most pressing social issues affecting our communities, and work to understand, examine, and critique the structures of power in this country, with focus on what/who has power to change and/or perpetuate systemic harm. We’ll role-play, debate, make art, use music, math, and more to question, analyze, and build informed perspectives on history and current events affecting your life.

Students will learn how to write, research for, and complete a CBA (a short paper examining a public issue) that is a state requirement for graduation. ALSO: through this class, interested seniors may complete their culminating social justice inquiry project as part of the pilot grad requirement we are implementing this year.

EXPECT TO COMPLETE HOMEWORK OUTSIDE OF CLASS EVERY WEEK TO BE ON-TRACK FOR FULL CREDIT.

Mesoamerican Studies A
Gabriella Sanchez-Stern, 1st Semester 2018-19
Cloud 221 - Sanchez : Tue/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

SS - World History 1 / 0.5

Mesoamerica. Where is it? What is it? Why does it matter?

“Meso” means middle. Therefore, Mesoamerica is a region within the continent of North America that includes parts of Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador, Belize, Honduras and Nicaragua.

Meso America is more than just a place on the map, however. It encompasses a culturally-rich area of the world with a deep history of ancient empires, complex pyramids, skilled mathematicians and astronomers, dreamers, healers, artists and story-tellers. Some of our basic mathematics principles were discovered by the Maya people. They made discoveries about the physical properties of our universe centuries before other parts of the world, using only the naked eye.The Aztec people built a city on top of a lake far before engineers figured out how to build the I-90 bridge. How did they do these things? How are we influenced by their discoveries today?

This course is for students with all levels of comfort in history and social studies. This course will incorporate art, math, geography, culture and historical thinking skills as we deepen our knowledge of the Aztec, Maya, Olmec, Toltec peoples.

>>>People of MesoAmerican heritage are highly encouraged to join this course. YOU are your ancestors’ wildest dreams. This class is for you. All are welcome.<<<

Mesoamerican Studies B
Gabriella Sanchez-Stern, 1st Semester 2018-19
Cloud 221 - Sanchez : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

SS - World History 1 / 0.5

Mesoamerica. Where is it? What is it? Why does it matter?

“Meso” means middle. Therefore, Mesoamerica is a region within the continent of North America that includes parts of Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador, Belize, Honduras and Nicaragua.

Meso America is more than just a place on the map, however. It encompasses a culturally-rich area of the world with a deep history of ancient empires, complex pyramids, skilled mathematicians and astronomers, dreamers, healers, artists and story-tellers. Some of our basic mathematics principles were discovered by the Maya people. They made discoveries about the physical properties of our universe centuries before other parts of the world, using only the naked eye.The Aztec people built a city on top of a lake far before engineers figured out how to build the I-90 bridge. How did they do these things? How are we influenced by their discoveries today?

This course is for students with all levels of comfort in history and social studies. This course will incorporate art, math, geography, culture and historical thinking skills as we deepen our knowledge of the Aztec, Maya, Olmec, Toltec peoples.

>>>People of MesoAmerican heritage are highly encouraged to join this course. YOU are your ancestors’ wildest dreams. This class is for you. All are welcome.<<<

U.S. History Intensive
Michael Hodapp, 1st Semester 2018-19
Room 105 : Mon/Tue/Wed/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

SS - US History 11A / 0.5; SS - US History 11B / 0.5

This U.S. History intensive will use reading, writing, costumes, debates, role plays, theater, art projects, videos, and classroom research to engage ourselves in a process of uncovering our collective and personal histories. We’ll approach history as a contested subject, one in which a multitude of stories from different perspectives must be weighed and considered as we search for larger trends and truths in U.S. society. Examining history through a lens of race, class, gender, and power, we’ll constantly ask whether the common stories we tell in U.S. history might be biased. If so, what purposes do they serve?

Rather than focusing on memorizing names, dates, and places, this class will challenge students to think critically about U.S. history and to identify historical trends and tensions within U.S. society. By the end of the semester, students should be able to construct a cohesive narrative that connects current events to earlier U.S. history, including to our founding documents.

This class will cover American history from the Columbian exchange through modern events. We’ll put a strong emphasis on developing history skills, including researching primary and secondary resources, spotting bias, and developing critical and supported arguments.

Washington State History
Adam Croft, 1st Semester 2018-19
Schoology and the city

None assigned

Students will explore the history of the state of Washington through the following topical strands:
- Social justice;
- Oral histories;
- First nations;
- Civics and government structures;
- Geography;
- Earth and ecological history and dynamics;
- Economics.

• The class awards 0.25 WA State History credit. This counts as elective credit and fulfills the WA State History graduation requirement.
• There will be a 30 minute in-person orientation that every student must attend to be enrolled. We’ve got two options for that: Thursday, February 18th and Friday, February 19th. On both days, the orientation will happen at 2:30 in the computer lab. If students register for the class later in the semester, they’ll organize a one-on-one orientation with me or Adam.
• The class will be run entirely through Schoology, with all assignments posted there and turned in there.
• The class will require students to travel places around town (such as neighborhoods, parks, and museums) to complete some assignments.
• Students will be required to complete an online check-in at a minimum each week. This online check-in is our equivalent of attendance.
• Students are encouraged to collaborate and complete assignments together, but can also do them solo if they’d like.

World Economics
Brian Aytch, 1st Semester 2018-19
RM# 122 : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

None assigned

There is an old adage that states “money makes the world go around”. Well, that is a realistic assessment of the world economy and perhaps an understatement. The world economy is a complex integration of mechanism that influences such phenomena as wages, goods production, trade and diplomacy. Students will learn about influences of the world economy on nations, provinces,businesses and individuals. Students will also learn about impact of world economies on specific ethnic groups, women/families, environment (climate change) and technology. There is a substantial social justice (ethnic studies/gender) emphasis in this course. Furthermore students will learn about major macroeconomic concepts,these concepts are tools economist use analyse the economy. Some of the concepts studied include, supply/demand theory, unemployment measurements, trade/tariffs, taxes, supply chains, population pyramids, market economy (capitalism) vs central planned economies (socialism), etc.

Technology

Digital Music (Beats!)
Susan Watters, 1st Semester 2018-19
B-19 : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

CTE - Recording Arts Tech 1 / 0.5

Course Description:
Students in this course will learn how to make music with Ableton Live and Push, and gain foundations in the physics and science of sound and digital audio. Concepts in this course can be translated to video, storytelling, and many types of programming, all while having fun making beats and music. Each student will have access to a digital workstations to create original music. Additionally, students will learn to record, perform, sequence, and manipulate sound.

Technically Sound (Tech/Sound Governing Committee)
Lydia Wynn, 1st Semester 2018-19
Winnie's Room 207 and Beyond : Tue/Thu 13:50-14:30

None assigned

We will add a mission and objectives as a committee. The general idea is to provide supports, systems, training, and resources for Nova as it relates to technology and sound equipment.

World Languages

French Studies
Lydia Condrea, 1st Semester 2018-19
RM #204 : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

WL - French 1A / 0.5; WL - French 1B / 0.5

All world language classes will start with a week of introduction to Language Acquisition, taught in English. The goal of this part of the course is to provide students with understanding of language acquisition/learning process and to empower them in their endeavor of mastering a new language by making them aware about most effective strategies to be used for reaching that purpose. Afterwards, participants will explore different aspects of French culture, learning linguistic pattern, and applying them in various situations. The instruction is in French. Teaching strategies, as in all language classes at Nova, are targeting language acquisition rather than learning.
EARNING CREDIT: FULL CREDIT upon the condition of 1) PERFECT ATTENDANCE 2) HOMEWORK COMPLETED. Homework is to be completed, there is no such thing as turning the homework in, getting a grade on it or such, homework is the material with which we are working in class, students are changing whatever needs to be changed, take notes, more experienced students are contributing more, beginners observe, follow, progress. Those who do not complete the homework on a regular basis will receive partial credit, absences as well result in lost of part of the credit.
When the student feels ready to demonstrate competencies for 2B level (does not even have to take the class), they are to:
1) Take a written test; 2) Go through an interview; 3) Prepare a project in French, and present it to the class.

Demonstrating 2B or higher competencies assures for that student levels 1A, 1B, 2A, and 2B on their transcript.

German Studies
Lydia Condrea, 1st Semester 2018-19
RM #204 : Mon/Wed/Thu 14:35-16:00

WL - German 1 Comp NM (Novice Mid)*1.0 CR / 0.5; WL - German 2 Comp NH (Novice High)*1.0 CR / 0.5; WL - German 3 Comp IL (Interm Low)*1.0 CR / 0.5

All world language classes will start with a week of introduction to Language Acquisition, taught in English. The goal of this part of the course is to provide students with understanding of language acquisition/learning process and to empower them in their endeavor of mastering a new language by making them aware about most effective strategies to be used for reaching that purpose. Afterwards, participants will explore different aspects of German culture, learning linguistic pattern, and applying them in various situations. Teaching strategies, as in all language classes at Nova, are targeting language acquisition rather than learning.

EARNING CREDIT: FULL CREDIT upon the condition of 1) PERFECT ATTENDANCE 2) HOMEWORK COMPLETED. Homework is to be completed, there is no such thing as turning the homework in, getting a grade on it or such, homework is the material with which we are working in class, students are changing whatever needs to be changed, take notes, more experienced students are contributing more, beginners observe, follow, progress. Those who do not complete the homework on a regular basis will receive partial credit, absences as well result in lost of part of the credit.
When the student feels ready to demonstrate competencies for 2B level (does not even have to take the class), they are to:
1) Take a written test; 2) Go through an interview; 3) Prepare a project in German, and present it to the class.

Demonstrating 2B or higher competencies assures for that student levels 1A, 1B, 2A, and 2B on their transcript.

Italian Studies
Lydia Condrea, 1st Semester 2018-19
RM #204 : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:15-11:40

WL - Italian 1 Comp NM (Novice Mid)*1.0 CR / 0.5; WL - Italian 2 Comp NH (Novice High)*1.0 CR / 0.5

All world language classes will start with a week of introduction to Language Acquisition, taught in English. The goal of this part of the course is to provide students with understanding of language acquisition/learning process and to empower them in their endeavor of mastering a new language by making them aware about most effective strategies to be used for reaching that purpose. Afterwards, participants will explore different aspects of Italian culture, learning linguistic pattern, and applying them in various situations. The instruction is in Italian. Teaching strategies, as in all language classes at Nova, are targeting language acquisition rather than learning.

EARNING CREDIT: FULL CREDIT upon the condition of 1) PERFECT ATTENDANCE 2) HOMEWORK COMPLETED. Homework is to be completed, there is no such thing as turning the homework in, getting a grade on it or such, homework is the material with which we are working in class, students are changing whatever needs to be changed, take notes, more experienced students are contributing more, beginners observe, follow, progress. Those who do not complete the homework on a regular basis will receive partial credit, absences as well result in lost of part of the credit.
When the student feels ready to demonstrate competencies for 2B level (does not even have to take the class), they are to:
1) Take a written test; 2) Go through an interview; 3) Prepare a project in Italian, and present it to the class.

Demonstrating 2B or higher competencies assures for that student levels 1A, 1B, 2A, and 2B on their transcript.

Japanese Studies, intermediate
Lydia Condrea, 1st Semester 2018-19
RM #204 : Tue/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

UE - Teacher Assistant (.25) / 0.5; WL - Japanese 1A / 0.5; WL - Japanese 2A / 0.5; WL - Japanese 3A / 0.5

All world language classes will start with a week of introduction to Language Acquisition, taught in English. The goal of this part of the course is to provide students with understanding of language acquisition/learning process and to empower them in their endeavor of mastering a new language by making them aware about most effective strategies to be used for reaching that purpose. Afterwards, participants will explore different aspects of Japanese culture, learning linguistic pattern, and applying them in various situations. This is an exploratory course, lead by students, advised and directed by Lydia. Learning strategies, as in all language classes at Nova, are targeting language acquisition rather than learning.

EARNING CREDIT: FULL CREDIT upon the condition of 1) PERFECT ATTENDANCE 2) HOMEWORK COMPLETED. Homework is to be completed, there is no such thing as turning the homework in, getting a grade on it or such, homework is the material with which we are working in class, students are changing whatever needs to be changed, take notes, more experienced students are contributing more, beginners observe, follow, progress. Those who do not complete the homework on a regular basis will receive partial credit, absences as well result in lost of part of the credit.
When the student feels ready to demonstrate competencies for 2B level (does not even have to take the class), they are to:
1) Take a written test; 2) Go through an interview; 3) Prepare a project in Japanese, and present it to the class.

Demonstrating 2B or higher competencies assures for that student levels 1A, 1B, 2A, and 2B on their transcript.

Modern Greek Studies
Lydia Condrea, 1st Semester 2018-19
room 204 : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

WL - Greek 1 Comp NM (Novice-Mid)*1.0 CR / 0.5

All world language classes will start with a week of introduction to Language Acquisition, taught in English. The goal of this part of the course is to provide students with understanding of language acquisition/learning process and to empower them in their endeavor of mastering a new language by making them aware about most effective strategies to be used for reaching that purpose. Afterwards, participants will explore different aspects of Greek language and culture, learning linguistic pattern, and applying them in various situations. Listening activities will be prevalent, attendance is key to success. Teaching strategies, as in all language classes at Nova Project, are targeting language acquisition rather than learning.

EARNING CREDIT: FULL CREDIT upon the condition of 1) PERFECT ATTENDANCE 2) HOMEWORK COMPLETED. Homework is to be completed, there is no such thing as turning the homework in, getting a grade on it or such, homework is the material with which we are working in class, students are changing whatever needs to be changed, take notes, more experienced students are contributing more, beginners observe, follow, progress. Those who do not complete the homework on a regular basis will receive partial credit, absences as well result in lost of part of the credit.
When the student feels ready to demonstrate competencies for 2B level (does not even have to take the class), they are to:
1) Take a written test; 2) Go through an interview; 3) Prepare a project in Moderne Greek, and present it to the class.

Demonstrating 2B or higher competencies assures for that student levels 1A, 1B, 2A, and 2B on their transcript.

Russian Studies
Lydia Condrea, 1st Semester 2018-19
room 204 : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:20-13:45

WL - Russian 3 Comp IL (Interm Low)*1.0 CR / 0.5; WL - Russian 3 Comp IL (Interm Low)*1.0 CR / 0.45

All world language classes will start with a week of introduction to Language Acquisition, taught in English. The goal of this part of the course is to provide students with understanding of language acquisition/learning process and to empower them in their endeavor of mastering a new language by making them aware about most effective strategies to be used for reaching that purpose. Afterwards, participants will explore different aspects of Russian culture, learning linguistic pattern, and applying them in various situations. The instruction is in Russian. Teaching strategies, as in all language classes at Nova, are targeting language acquisition rather than learning.

EARNING CREDIT: FULL CREDIT upon the condition of 1) PERFECT ATTENDANCE 2) HOMEWORK COMPLETED. Homework is to be completed, there is no such thing as turning the homework in, getting a grade on it or such, homework is the material with which we are working in class, students are changing whatever needs to be changed, take notes, more experienced students are contributing more, beginners observe, follow, progress. Those who do not complete the homework on a regular basis will receive partial credit, absences as well result in lost of part of the credit.
When the student feels ready to demonstrate competencies for 2B level (does not even have to take the class), they are to:
1) Take a written test; 2) Go through an interview; 3) Prepare a project in Russian, and present it to the class.

Demonstrating 2B or higher competencies assures for that student levels 1A, 1B, 2A, and 2B on their transcript.

Spanish Studies
Lydia Condrea, 1st Semester 2018-19
RM #204 : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

WL - Spanish 1A / 0.5; WL - Spanish 1B / 0.5; WL - Spanish 2A / 0.5; WL - Spanish 2B / 0.5

All world language classes will start with a week of introduction to Language Acquisition, taught in English. The goal of this part of the course is to provide students with understanding of language acquisition/learning process and to empower them in their endeavor of mastering a new language by making them aware about most effective strategies to be used for reaching that purpose. Afterwards, participants will explore different aspects of Spanish culture, learning linguistic pattern, and applying them in various situations. The instruction is in Spanish. Teaching strategies, as in all language classes at Nova, are targeting language acquisition rather than learning.

EARNING CREDIT: FULL CREDIT upon the condition of 1) PERFECT ATTENDANCE 2) HOMEWORK COMPLETED. Homework is to be completed, there is no such thing as turning the homework in, getting a grade on it or such, homework is the material with which we are working in class, students are changing whatever needs to be changed, take notes, more experienced students are contributing more, beginners observe, follow, progress. Those who do not complete the homework on a regular basis will receive partial credit, absences as well result in lost of part of the credit.
When the student feels ready to demonstrate competencies for 2B level (does not even have to take the class), they are to:
1) Take a written test; 2) Go through an interview; 3) Prepare a project in Spanish, and present it to the class.

Demonstrating 2B or higher competencies assures for that student levels 1A, 1B, 2A, and 2B on their transcript.