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Found 93 courses.

Career & Technical Education CTE)

Animation Induction (Level 1)
Stefan Gruber, S1 FALL 2022-23
205 Cloud Level Animation Labs : Tue/Thu 10:25-11:55

CTE - Graphic Design BEG / 0.5

Open to all people of all levels of artistic talent from none to godly. Animation is a different art from drawing, so no drawing skills are necessary, only braveness. We’ll be exploring many techniques including 2D puppet, pixelation, flipbooks, clay. It’s a lot of fun and really good exercise for the imagination. We’ll also watch a lot of animation in here to get inspiration and meet with guest animators who make artistic animation for a living.

Career Exploration 1-Semester 1-Mon/Wed/Fri
Jennifer Spigner, S1 FALL 2022-23
RM #B-20 : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-9:55

CTE - Career Conn-1 (JS Only) / 0.5

The world of careers has many paths to explore and also gain professional skills in the process.
Are you interested on how to find and keep a job?
Come to this class and you will become workplace ready to look for jobs and opportunities.

Identify careers based on assessments on interests and skills
Career Research
Identify personal skills, interests and abilities and relate them to current career choices.
Present information to class on career interests
Essential Careers during covid
Resume building
Interviewing Skills
21st Century Skills
Employment Law
Health and Safe in the workplace
Workplace Readiness Skills:Professionalism, Communication, Collaboration, Adaptability, Technical
Leadership and Community Skills

Career Exploration 2-Semester 1-Tues ONLY
Jennifer Spigner, S1 FALL 2022-23
RM #B-20 : Tue 8:45-9:55

CTE - Career Conn-2 (JS Only) / 0.5

*PRE-REQUISITES: Time Flies 1A AND/OR currently in an Internship such as Wellness Center Intern, Main office Assistant, Cafe Program with Farestart or has a job or internship at an organization or company. Please check with Jennifer if any questions. Thanks.

*Through hands-on experiences as an Wellness Ambassador role OR another current work based experience that will provide the opportunity to demonstrate your current workplace skills and continued growth in those skills.

Meet once a week to update on workplace skills and reflection for growth in your contributions while doing work based experience the other days of the week. Managing your time in your work and/or projects.

Continually exploring career paths as your interests change and develop.

Understand the skills and demonstrate them as you work on projects individually or collaboratively.

Through hands-on experience, guest speakers, research and exploration the student will discover a variety of career pathways for post-secondary educational choices and careers.

Students will understand the importance of Ambassador role expectations and demonstrate growth and your contribution in your community leadership role.

Workplace Readiness Skills: Professionalism, Communication, Collaboration, Adaptability, Technical
Leadership and Community Skills

Financial Literacy Skills such as budgeting, cost/benefit analysis, saving and credit.

Character Design (all levels)
Stefan Gruber, S1 FALL 2022-23
205 Cloud Level Animation Lab : Tue/Thu 12:35-14:05

ART - Drawing / Painting BEG / 0.5

In here we’ll approach character design from many directions. From live drawing portraiture to looking deeply at the designs of characters we love, copying and inventing our own characters and trying to reinvent for ourselves what a character even is. Does a character have to be depicted as a living being? Can a concept be a character? Can the concept of a character be the main driving force behind the design? What is more important, form, function, fun, or formula? To further explore the OC’s we create, we’ll be playing them in one shot role playing games, incorporating them into comics, and other world building projects.

Nova Farm
Susan Barth, S1 FALL 2022-23
Susan's Room #B3 and the Nova Farm : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:35-14:05

CTE - Env Horticulture 1 / 0.5

Plan to be outside and get dirty. In this class, will have both indoor and outdoor learning. You will experience botany, horticulture, farming, and social justice around food. You will work on the farm, cultivate crops, learn about environmental issues surrounding agriculture and do projects catered to your interests, including leadership, internships, and career paths. Be prepared to get dirty. This fall, we work on putting some of the garden to bed, planting hardy winter crops and landscaping, art and building. Come learn how to use power tools. Grow stuff, the bees need you.

This is a CTE class that can cross credit with science. You can also earn college credit through South Seattle College if you take this class for a full year or meet extra competencies in one semester. Please discuss with Susan.

A graduation Social Justice Project could be done in this class.

Open Animation Portal V2 (advanced)
Stefan Gruber, S1 FALL 2022-23
Room 205 : Mon 12:35-14:05

ART - Graphic Design ADV (Stefan Only) / 0.5

Open Portal is a way to extend your projects from other animation classes into a bigger project, or to establish an animation film of your own as a self directed project. If you have a 300 frame animation piece and want to color it, add shadows, and textures for a more professional feel, this is the place to do that. If you want to plan out an animation piece and do some tests and even finish a piece in the four semester, this is a great spot for that as well.

Committee

Accessibility Committee
Allison Sterrett, S1 FALL 2022-23
209 : Tue 9:40-10:20

SS - Student Government / 0.15

In this governing committee, students will work together to help make Nova class materials and spaces accessible for all learners. We might record audio versions of class texts, find and share the best fidgets, research and share information about useful technology supports, create organizers to help with inquiry projects, gather and share feedback about class accessibility or…..? Bring your ideas for making Nova a welcoming place for everyone to learn!

Action Faction and Wellness Steering Committee
Eyva Winet, S1 FALL 2022-23
121 : Thu 9:40-10:20

SS - Student Government / 0.15

Action Faction Mission Statement:
As an all-inclusive committee, we work to create a safe and respectful community for all genders and sexualities. We combat sexuality and gender identity oppression by creating positive actions in Nova and beyond. Positive actions include maintaining safe spaces for discussions, resources and events. We believe that any social justice movement must work towards inclusion of other social justice goals. We recognize that all oppressions are connected and in no way do we want our actions to propagate other forms of oppression.

Wellness Steering Committee:
We will be meeting regularly with the folks running the new Nova Wellness Center to help build, improve and expand their services for Nova students and the community. We have already helped architects design the temporary space but will continue to advise for the permanent space. We have helped hire staff for the space but will also give feedback and support their understanding of Nova and our amazingly diverse students. We agreed to help them get student art and interesting pieces to decorate the space so we need folks who are willing to make or curate art. We will also be working on grant writing to get more services and expand the possibilities of what the wellness center can offer.

Join us! We need your voice to drive this work. Country Doctor is very happy to collaborate and take guidance from students so we need you all to show up and make this center truly work for youth!

There are opportunities to work on culminating inquiry projects, health credit, CTE credit, peer education, grant writing, internships in the health field connected to this committee!

ASL and Deaf Culture Club
Michael Cooper, S1 FALL 2022-23
room 204 : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:00-10:40

UE - Student Activity (EXP 2021) / 0.25

Student-run ASL Club: Learning basic ASL and Deaf Culture through various means of learning: films, games, arts and activities. No experience with ASL is required to participate although no voice is permitted during the ASL Club.

Audiobook
Debbie Kuttner, S1 FALL 2022-23
Room 209 (Allison's and Lisa's Room)

LA - Critical Lit & Social Inquiry / 0.15

This committee listens to books by authors of color, often learning about the author, promoting the end of the month Intergenerational Racial Justice book club. For folks who like reading with their ears instead of their eyes (or both, cause we’ll have copies of the text). FYI, the intergenerational racial justice book club is not a requirement of this committee, but you can: it meets on the last Wednesday of the month on zoom, where current and former Nova community members gather to discuss books!
Facilitated by Lisa with help from Debbie
English language arts credit can be earned through setting up indep competency contract with Debbie.

Budget, Marketing, and Fundraising
Eyva Winet, S1 FALL 2022-23
121 : Tue 9:40-10:20

SS - Student Government / 0.15

We will be managing the Nova budget which includes funding sources: general sps budget, asb, alliance for education, grants and more! We will grow our understanding these sources and the rules around spending. We will work to be intentional and fiscally responsible in approving funding requests from the school community as we work to replenish these funds through marketing and fundraising.

We will be building relationships with community organizations and funders to help provide services and supports and opportunities for our students. We will be fundraising and making materials to use when reaching out to potential funders or partners. We will be surveying students, staff and families to collect information to tell Nova’s story authentically and to determine what students, staff and families think about what partnerships and projects we should be seeking support and funding. We will work with Nova Roots to create fundraisers for Nova and run our own fundraisers. You will learn job, organizing and fundraising skills. This will be a working committee not a talking a lot committee.

There is the possibility of working on math competencies through this committees projects. Talk to Eyva directly if you are interested in that extension of this committee work.

Buttons and Posters - (Governing Committee)
Rea Biddle, S1 FALL 2022-23
Rea's Room - 122 : Tue 10:00-10:40

SS - Student Government / 0.15

Button Brigade will work in collaboration with Action Faction and the rest of the Nova community to create buttons, posters, and flyers for Nova events and to help disseminate important information to the community.

Circle Keepers - Wed
Annie Parker, S1 FALL 2022-23
Room 114 : Wed 10:00-10:40

UE - Leadership / 0.15

The new Circle Keepers Committee is focused on training in and practicing restorative justice at Nova. Students and staff will participate in practice and training to become circle keepers ourselves.

We [participating Nova staff] envision this committee over time to become a self-sustaining, problem-solving space, one that supports the culture of Nova being a community that resolves problems by working/communicating with and learning from each other.

What is restorative justice? And how does it help reduce and prevent harm at school? How does it increase student well-being? What are the skills and/or knowledge you, as students, want to learn and practice most towards being a circle keeper? and/or contributing to establishing this committee? and/or restorative justice practices in our lives?

from Maisha T. Winn’s book, Justice on Both Sides: Transforming Education Through Restorative Justice

“…to practice restorative justice, one must not only be committed to seeing the full humanity of others, but also being open to the possibility of not always being right, and instead, making things right.”

Committee to Philosophy - Thursday
The Dark Knight Batman, S1 FALL 2022-23
102 : Thu 9:40-10:20

None assigned

This is a committee to talk philosophy. Not debate. Talk philosophy.
It is also a committee to teach you how to begin to or advance your critical thinking.
You will also have the opportunity to participate in the Ethics Bowl if you wish, but it is not required.
This committee is different than the Philosophy class in that you don’t have to take one to do the other.

Committee to Philosophy - Tuesday
The Dark Knight Batman, S1 FALL 2022-23
102 : Tue/Thu 9:40-10:20

None assigned

This is a committee to talk philosophy. Not debate. Talk philosophy.
It is also a committee to teach you how to begin to or advance your critical thinking.
You will also have the opportunity to participate in the Ethics Bowl if you wish, but it is not required.
This committee is different than the Philosophy class in that you don’t have to take one to do the other.

Dungeons and Dragons
The Dark Knight Batman, S1 FALL 2022-23
Rm 102 : Thu 14:00-15:15

UE - Student Activity (EXP 2021) / 0.25

This committee is devoted to playing the incredible role playing game – Dungeons and Dragons. Each Friday we will come together and play. Create a character! Run a campaign! No experience necessary at all. We will teach you how to play. Must be willing to get along with others (or be willing to learn how to), show up unless you have an incredibly good excuse, and certainly have the capacity to have fun.
Also, if you don’t have dice or source books, don’t worry about it. We have some extra you can borrow for the day.

Clearly, we will be doing this online.

Guild
Michelle Vecchio, S1 FALL 2022-23
122 : Thu 9:40-10:20

None assigned

Guild is a governing committee that supports the democratic planning of school events including dances, movie nights, karaoke, and school spirit events!

Make it What You Want (MiWYW)
Debbie Kuttner, S1 FALL 2022-23
Room 220 Debbie's room : Fri 10:00-10:40

None assigned

The title says it all. Make this space what you want on Fridays. I can offer yarn and crochet hooks and knitting needles; craft supplies; art supplies; and even some kitchen gadgets and food if we want to make some cotton candy or gummy candies or fry up some healthy goodness in the air fryer. A great space to relax and enjoy your Friday morning and maybe get to know some new people or hang with old friends.

Mothership + Safety
Adam Croft, S1 FALL 2022-23

SS - Student Government / 0.13

Mothership and Safety work together to support the student government structure and keep our Nova community safe.

Mutual Aid (Tuesdays)
Adam Croft, S1 FALL 2022-23
room 202 and beyond : Tue 10:45-11:55

UE - Leadership / 0.15

Susan will co-facilitate this committee with Adam.

Let’s tend to our school’s relation to the Earth and each other, including through maintaining and strengthening our systems for composting, energy conservation, environmental justice, ecological awareness, and anything else we can do for our living community.

Mythology
Debbie Kuttner, S1 FALL 2022-23
Room 220 Debbie's & Lisa's Room : Wed 10:00-10:40

UE - Leadership / 0.15

Let’s share questions and ideas with one other! This committee will be co-created based on all our interests. We might chat, or draw representations of ourselves in myth, tell favorite myths, watch videos, and more. We might discuss the following:

What excites each of us about mythology? How do we see or not see ourselves represented in mythologies? What’s up with hierarchies of truth (why some cultures’ sacred stories are called “myth” and some aren’t)? What motifs/archetypes/recurring symbols do we notice, and how might they relate our inner lives? What’s the interaction between myths and power dynamics, and how does myth relates to history? Also: comparative mythology! (why some stories re-appear across different cultural traditions).

Facilitated by Lisa in Debbie’s room 220

N2N Mentorship
Debbie Kuttner, S1 FALL 2022-23
114 : Thu 10:00-10:40

SS - Student Government / 0.25

This committee is open to people who are interested in:

A) Being mentored by older or more experienced Nova students. It is a way to build your comfort with the way Nova works and how to find success as a student here.

or

B) Being a peer mentor to support new students adjust to Nova. It is a way for you to provide your expertise and knowledge of the school to help guide fellow students.

Nova Minecraft Gov. Committee
Lance Brown, S1 FALL 2022-23
Rm 221 : Thu 9:40-10:20

SS - Student Government / 0.25

25 STUDENT MAXIMUM

Students will participate in Nova Minecraft Project.
The students will recreate the Nova building in Minecraft.
When complete all students will be welcome to visit the Nova Minecraft Building.
This would give us some sense of community again.

Paper Making Committee
Adam Croft, S1 FALL 2022-23
room B-03 : Wed 9:40-10:20

UE - Leadership / 0.15

Help our school recycle paper within our building by learning to make paper from the pulpy remains of used paper. We’ll also make journals and other items with this Nova-made paper.

Planet Nova
Adam Croft, S1 FALL 2022-23
room 202 and beyond : Fri 2:05-2:45

UE - Leadership / 0.15

Susan will co-facilitate this committee with Adam.

Let’s tend to our school’s relation to the Earth and each other, including through maintaining and strengthening our systems for composting, energy conservation, environmental justice, ecological awareness, and anything else we can do for our living community.

POC Committee - Thurs
Melissa Park, S1 FALL 2022-23
Melissa's room, 101 : Thu 9:40-10:20

SS - Student Government / 0.15

Note: We are now meeting on Thursdays ONLY. This governing committee, the People of Color Committee (POCC), is a meeting place for students and staff who identify as people of color to reconnect, affirm, and unapologetically be ourselves. We are especially focused on citizenship teaching and learning, building community in our shared spaces, developing and growing our leadership skills, and acting and reflecting on issues of race and equity in a safe and open environment.

Past projects have included creating and facilitating various workshops/teach-ins at school, e.g., Racial Justice Day, warm clothing drives in the winter, field trips, pot-lucks, movie screenings, and collaborating with local organizations. Students will share facilitation duties of weekly committee meetings & short- and long-term projects.

POCC is one of several governing committees which give input to Recruitment Committee and our administrators for Nova’s Mission/Vision C-SIP School Improvement Plan (an official document generated annually by Nova’s administrators that sets goals, enrichment, instructions programs, students’ achievement, and assessment of the school, and is published on our school’s SPS website.

Quiet Art Space
Allison Sterrett, S1 FALL 2022-23
Art Room (219) : Fri 10:00-10:40

ART - Exploring the Arts (EXP 2021) / 0.15

Quiet Art Space is a weekly gathering space to connect with peers while working on individual art pieces. We will work together to offer weekly optional art prompts and supportive feedback.

Radical Reading Group
Adam Croft, S1 FALL 2022-23
room 202 : Fri 10:00-10:40

UE - Leadership / 0.15

We’ll read and discuss various works of radical political economy, with the goal of developing a reading guide and other resources for those interested in pursuing radical thought and praxis.

Recruitment fall 2022 Tuesdays only
Debbie Kuttner, S1 FALL 2022-23
Rm 114 Annie's & Lydia's room : Tue 9:40-10:20

SS - Student Government / 0.15

Recruitment is the public face of Nova. We plan orientations, open house for 8th graders. This year’s focus is “how do we represent Nova?” to the district, enrollment office, highschool and 8th grade counselors, as well as the option fair, and any other space Nova needs to be represented. As with all committees, recruitment puts an emphasis on not only striving always to be an anti-racist committee, but also how do we maintain and co-create Nova’s social justice identity internally and externally.

Recycled Crafts
Rea Biddle, S1 FALL 2022-23
122 : Fri 10:00-10:40

None assigned

come make beautiful things with materials that would otherwise be thrown out

Senior Committee - Tue
Melissa Park, S1 FALL 2022-23
Melissa's Room, 101 : Tue 9:40-10:20

SS - Student Government / 0.15

Catherine and Melissa will co-facilitate this governing committee!

We’ll plan and execute senior-oriented activities, supports, and events, especially our graduation ceremony (!!!), but also study sessions and anything else to help make everyone’s final year of high school successful and meaningful.

Get clear on what you need to complete for graduation this year, and get/create supports for you to get there!

Sound Committee
Jared Harkness, S1 FALL 2022-23
Band Room

UE - Student Activity (EXP 2021) / 0.15

The sound committee runs the music makers’ space called The Band Room, supports all school events that need sound and music and improves access for all students interested in learning and making music. Band is responsible for cleaning, organizing, fixing and improving instruments and equipment in the music maker’s space and is working to grow music opportunities at Nova.

Video Game Social Committee
Julia Reade, S1 FALL 2022-23
Room 201 : Fri 10:00-10:40

UE - Personal Growth / 0.25

This INVITE ONLY committee is a structured, student-lead committee designed to offer students an opportunity to further develop their social skills. The group will gather around a common interest—gaming—and engage in discussions about this topic.

Walking Club
Catherine Cougan, S1 FALL 2022-23
room 207

None assigned

Want to get to know the neighborhood history, flora, and fauna? Interested in getting some fresh air in the middle of your day? Join us in walking club where we wander!

Writing Circle - Fri
Melissa Park, S1 FALL 2022-23
Melissa's Room, 101 : Fri 10:00-10:40

LA - Creative Writing / 0.15; UE - Student Activity (EXP 2021) / 0.15

Writing Circle Committee is a writing community for anyone who likes (and/or wants to try) writing and grow/experiment with your writing practice. Each week we’ll do some writing and (voluntary) sharing. Committee members will co-create writing prompts, activities, and/or possible group projects, e.g. open mics, art shares, publishing a poetry journal, poetry slams and/or more. More details posted here asap.

Yearbook
Susan Barth, S1 FALL 2022-23
Rm 3- Susan : Tue 9:40-10:20

CTE - Publishing Yearbook 1 / 0.25

Yearbook will meet both Tuesday’s and Thursday’s in Susan’s Room B03. We will photograph events and create our yearbook. We are looking for motivated, organized, creative types (you do not need to have all of those traits together). We want photographers, designers, and tech savvy folks to help us. We will capture the amazingness of our community. We also want the yearbook to be affordable for all who want it. So, we will be figuring out new and creative ways to fund raise. No experience necessary, just a strong willingness to contribute. You will learn all aspects of yearbook production regardless of your specialty. This class will be facilitated by Brent, Susan B.

The basic credit is .25 per semester, depending on the amount of work you put in.

Zine & Fundraising
Catherine Cougan, S1 FALL 2022-23
207

None assigned

We will make zines! And raise funds for Nova!

Elective

Chess and Variants
Stefan Gruber, S1 FALL 2022-23
205 Cloud Level Animation Lab : Mon 10:45-11:55

UE - Student Activity (EXP 2021) / 0.15

Your objective will be to improve your chess playing abilities, and learn some variations on the chess rules.

Peer Support Study Hall
Julia Reade, S1 FALL 2022-23
Room 201

None assigned

We are holding space for students to work on projects from their classes, with support from IEP staff. We will also be supporting the school-wide effort to develop and implement more robustly accommodations for differently abled and neurodivergent learners in the Nova community.

Enrichment

Nova FQLL/DEAR Mashup
Julia Reade, S1 FALL 2022-23
Outside Room 201

None assigned

We will read books and curate and maintain Nova’s free queer little library.

Running Start Resource
Julia Reade, S1 FALL 2022-23

IEP - HS Study Skills M / 0.5

Snack, Chat, and Craft
Julia Reade, S1 FALL 2022-23
Room 201

None assigned

One week we snack, next week we craft, the following week we chat! This committee is taking the place of Van Gogh with the Flow. We practice social skills around shared interests. Please come talk with Julia before registering if you are not a returning VGWF-er.

Fine Arts

All the World's a Stage
Brian Neel, S1 FALL 2022-23
RM B Dance Room : Tue/Thu 12:35-14:05

ART - Theatre BEG / 0.5

Facilitator: K. Brian Neel

Students in this class can receive FA-Theatre 8 credit.

This introductory course is for all students looking to develop skills in acting and performing in front of others. Public speaking, creative problem solving, and collaboration are explored through creative activities, voice and movement exercises, improvisation, story structure, creating character, and scene study. No previous theatre experience necessary. All students are welcome.

THREE LEVELS OF CLASS:
- Participate in group theater games and exercises
- Complete in-class performance creation exercises
- Be Attentive and Respectful of others’ creations

CLAY - (T/TH 10:25 - 11:55)
Becky Laird, S1 FALL 2022-23
Art Room (219) : Tue/Thu 10:25-11:55

ART - Ceramics BEG / 0.5; UE - Student Activity (EXP 2021) / 0.25

PRIORITY FOR THIS CLASS WILL BE STUDENTS WHO HAVE NOT TAKEN CLAY AT NOVA! If a student has experience and would like to do an independent study (that will include stewardship of the clay area of the art room, they should sign up for individual/group independents. Students will work on their hand-building skills and the opportunity to work on the pottery wheel. The class will be limited to 24 students. Thinking/talking/sharing about your work is part of this class.

Please plan to make things, talk about your work, ask questions, reflect about your process, practice your clay skills consistently, learn now techniques, engage with community outside of Nova, think about your growth, learn about clay artists, and lots more.

Fine Arts / Science

Waves of Color (Oceanography/Art)
Catherine Cougan, S1 FALL 2022-23
120

ART - Drawing / Painting BEG / 0.5; SC - Oceanography I / 0.5

Waves of Color

Course Overview: Semester At A Glance
This is the first semester of a potentially 2 part class. This course is appropriate for any students who are interested in taking a class involving overlapping qualities found in painting and scientific methods, and/or would like science and art credits to graduate. This class covers introductions to watercolor methods and strategies in tandem with introductory oceanography principles. In addition to investigating the fundamentals of color theory primarily through the watercolor medium, we’ll be learning about properties of oceanography; student driven inquiry will be leading us into various realms of chemical, physical, biological, and geological oceanographic investigations. The goal is to practice your observational skills and grow confidence in yourself as an artist AND scientist throughout this course.

Our class will spend time on scientific inquiry skills, mechanical painting techniques, data interpretation skills, and applying these collectively out in the field.

There will be opportunities to visit and run experiments using the UW Oceanography Puget Sound model, as well as time on the R/V Carson (dates TBD) . Depending on class ideas, guest visits by community experts and field trips to collect water samples at various locations will also be an option.

Most of the coursework is designed for you to be able to complete during class time. Be prepared to practice your skills and collaborate on projects. We will also follow the 8 absence attendance policy, which will help keep you on top of things in this class.


Office hours, aka extra work or question time is available 2-4 (days TBD) in room 207 for any student who would like support.

Semester Roadmap
(our inquiries will be loosely revolving around 4 themes throughout the semester)
Unit 1: Intro + History of Oceanography/Naturalist Painters
Unit 2: Light Properties + Color Theory
Unit 3: Depth + Pressure Relationships
Unit 4: Gradients + Life

Health

Gender Tea
Eyva Winet, S1 FALL 2022-23
121 : Wed 2:05-2:45

UE - Personal Growth / 0.15

Gender Tea
Is the gender binary getting you down? How about the gender hierarchy? Tired of other people telling you what your identity is or should be or that your doing it wrong? Want to drink tea and chat with other rad people who want to talk about gender, sex and sexuality in a safe and supportive space? Want to imagine space where all bodies are safe, free and celebrated? Want to work toward creating that here and now? Everyone is welcome and encouraged to come as long as you can agree to the safety norms grown in the group.

Talk to Eyva about Health or other kinds of credit.

Health
Susan Barth, S1 FALL 2022-23
Room #B3 : Tue/Thu 10:25-11:55

CTE - Family Health / 0.5

We will be exploring deeper meaning and connections within your physical, mental and social well being and how to relate them to yourself, those close to you and your local and global communities. This will include getting CPR certified. You will gain a holistic understanding of how to recognize when aspects of your health are out of balance, how to create safe practices surrounding your health and the choices you make. We will explore what is needed to keep your body, identity and community healthy. We will work on positive goal setting around your health and aspects that may affect it. You will create ways in which you can empower yourself in your own health and take positive action.

This class can also be part of a Graduation Pathway. You would be working with Careers and the Wellness Center.

You will need to complete the Health CBA as part of full credit. This is also a graduation requirement.

Communicating Ideas in Health
Students will be able to share and teach information that they have gathered on issues of importance for their own health.
Intro to the Senior Inquiry Project, including Service Learning.
The student can create traditional presentations of information. i.e. research posters and/or presentations
The student can create non-traditional presentations of information. i.e. artistic responses, games, coloring books, comic books, technology, etc.
The student can communicate understanding to peers, experts and laypersons.
The student will use technology to communicate, educate and call to action for conservation projects. This will include websites, blogs, social media etc.

Language Arts

Freshfolks - Ethnic Studies - Glorious Humans
The Dark Knight Batman, S1 FALL 2022-23
102 : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:45-11:55

LA - 9A Intro to LIT & COMP / 0.5

This class can only being considered for LA 9A and WH 1 and it counts as an ethnic studies class.

WARNING: THERE WILL BE NO CELL PHONES ALLOWED IN THIS CLASS. IF YOU CAN’T DEAL WITH THAT IT IS GOING TO BE A LONG SEMESTER. IF YOU TAKE A CELL PHONE DURING CLASS WITHOUT PRIOR PERMISSION FROM YOUR COORDINATOR YOU WILL BE MARKED AS ABSENT FOR THE DAY. AT YOUR 7TH ABSENCE YOU WILL LOSE HALF OF YOUR CREDIT.

This class is about the human beings who have broken incredible barriers in sports. We will celebrate their great accomplishments through history. We will look at humans who have been traditionally marginalized but rose to every challenge or ridiculous social obstacle placed in front of them.

This Freshfolks class is designed to orient and introduce you to how Nova works and what language arts classes are like here. As the course title suggest, we hope to move from inquiry (how to pose inquiry and to take ownership over your learning) to understanding (understanding Nova norms and inquiry-based approach to teaching and learning). During the class you will read stories, watch films and documentaries, and practice your philosophical, writing, and communication skills. You will write an a research project as well as an inquiry based project.
Additionally, as you experiment with writing in different genres, you will learn something about analyzing a text (i.e., a story, poem, film, or image) and how to give an account of how something means what it does (or what you think it does). Students in this course will be encouraged to read and reflect on their own ideas and experiences and then examine these ideas in relation to the films and other texts we read and analyze together.

Since this is an ethnic studies class you will be learning more about who you are and where you came from in the context of intersectionality. We will read Ibram Kendi’s book, How to Be an Antiracist, and both examine and put into practice what it would mean to do this kind of work. We will be decentering “whiteness” and exploring the various narratives that exist in this country that contribute to the very way we behave, act, and feel.

Our goal for the semester will be to read, write, think, and discuss things that matter most to us. In other words, we want to find things we care about and then talk and write about them together. We will strive to develop an inquiry community where we can respectfully share, discuss, and critique our ideas and the ideas of others. We will push each other to think carefully about our beliefs and assumptions about the world as well as how we’ve come to understand the world and ourselves in particular ways. With an eye toward these ends, students will engage in daily, meaningful reading, writing, speaking, and listening tasks in English class and at home.

Philosophy
The Dark Knight Batman, S1 FALL 2022-23
Rm 102 : Tue/Thu 10:25-11:55

LA - 12B Comparative Lit & Comp / 0.5

Level: This is open to any one at any level as long as they are willing to engage in thinking, reading, and writing.

In this class we will look at the following branches of philosophy: Ethics, Epistemology, Metaphysics, and Social and Political Philosophies.
We will try to do this by engaging in these different ideas by practicing them through different experiments that will be created during the class. There will be reading, watching, thinking, and writing in this class. We will try to explore, discuss, and experience many ideas through the course of this class.
If you like working your brain, asking questions, and engaging in the possibility of ideas then this will be a great class for you.

Some Films
The Dark Knight Batman, S1 FALL 2022-23
Room 102 : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:35-14:05

LA - 12B Comparative Lit & Comp / 0.5

This is an ethnic studies class.
CONTENT AND PHONE WARNINGS: THIS CLASS WILL DISCUSS ISSUES OF RACE, POWER, PRIVILEGE, GENDER, EQUALITY, DEATH, LIFE, FREEDOM, CONTROL, BEAUTY, AND REALITY. DO NOT TAKE THE CLASS IF ANY OF THESE ISSUES WILL BE TOO DIFFICULT FOR YOU TO MANAGE.
NO CELL PHONES WILL BE ALLOWED IN CLASS. YOU WILL BE COUNTED ABSENT IF YOU PULL YOURS OUT WITHOUT PERMISSION. IF YOU CAN’T DEAL WITH THIS THEN DO NOT TAKE THE CLASS.
This class is about decentering the whiteness of film as much as possible. We will be watching films directed, written, and/or about BIPOC.
As we do so, we will look at who we are as humans, what we believe, how we came to believe it, and what actions we manifest or can manifest to both understand who we are as well as the perspectives of other humans.
We will study different types of story arcs and archetypes through viewing and discussion different films and documentaries. Each film will have a project that will be due for it, and will be created within the context of the film and discussion in class. Some of the films we MIGHT watch are:

“Get Out”
“Black Klansman”
“Everything Everywhere All at Once”
“I Am Not Your Negro”
“Moonlight”
“Fences”
“The Big Sick”
“Smoke Signals”
“Reel Indian”
“Do the Right Thing”
“Set it Off”
“High and Low”
“When We Were Kings”
“I’m No Longer Here”
“Parasite”
“Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon”

and many others. If you are interested in films and/or stories this would be a good class to take.

Storytelling via Art, Archetypes, and Rituals
Debbie Kuttner, S1 FALL 2022-23
Room 220 Debbie's room : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:45-11:55

LA - 10B World LIT & COMP / 0.5

I didn’t have room to add information about archetypes and tarot in the title, but they are central to this class as well as storytelling, art, and ritual.

The Art of Writing
The Dark Knight Batman, S1 FALL 2022-23
Room 102 : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

LA - 12B Comparative Lit & Comp / 0.5

NO CELL PHONES IN THIS CLASS. IF YOU CAN’T DEAL WITH THAT DON’T TAKE THIS CLASS.
ATTENDANCE POLICY: You are allowed 8 absences in this class, excused or unexcused. At your 9th absence of the class (this means you have missed four weeks of this class) you will be required to do both Content and Community projects to make up for the credit that will be removed due to your absences.
PHONE POLICY: Cell phones are not allowed in the class. If you take a cell phone out without permission, you will be marked absent for the day. If you would like to discuss why I have this policy, feel free to ask me.

And the great God, Shub la Pulesh, pronounced the written word. AND IT WAS GOOD!
Then the great God, Shub la Pulesh, pronounced that the written word could be poetry, short story, essay, letters to friends, comments, grocery lists, etc. And the list grew and grew of what the written word could be. AND IT WAS GOOD!
Then the great God, Shub la Pulesh, pronounced that a teacher must be born to offer a room where this could happen. So, out of the mud and the grime of this wheat thresher of a world was brought a man. TERRANCE, HE SHALL BE CALLED!!!!! the great God, Shub la Pulesh, cried. AND IT WAS BETTER THAN GOOD!!!
The great God, Shub la Pulesh, proclaimed that sometimes one would read what one had written out loud. AND THAT WOULD BE VERY GOOD INDEED!
And then and verily and finally the great God, Shub la Pulesh, pronounced, LET US TAKE ALL OF THESE WRITINGS AND COMPILE THEM INTO A PORTFOLIO AND THEN WHEN THE END COMES WE SHALL CULL OUT THE GREATEST OF THE GREAT AND MAKE THEM INTO A BOOK! YES! EACH OF YOU WILL MAKE A BOOK!!!!! AND THOSE BOOKS….THEY SHALL BE GOOOOOOOOD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
And the Earth shook from the magnitude of the great god, Shub la Pulesh’s, statement, but settled back down again so that students could come to Room 41 on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday to write and read the great words.

toolkit
Debbie Kuttner, S1 FALL 2022-23
Room 220 Debbie's room : Tue/Thu 8:45-9:55

LA - 10A World LIT & COMP / 0.5

Would you like to be more organized? Do you want to learn more about how to use technology to meet goals in your life? Would you like to learn how to study and take notes for Nova or for your future? Student

Video Essay Book Club
Ricardo Wemiz, S1 FALL 2022-23
114 : Tue/Thu 8:45-9:35

LA / 0.5

Video Essay Book Club

In this class we will be exploring Video Essays as a medium. As we explore and work with modern technology, we find new ways to share information and tell stories. This class will run like a book club but for the modern age of information sharing with students sharing video essays with the class for us to explore the medium. We will be using our literary analysis skills we would normally employ with written media with video essays and compare how well they accomplish their message.

We will explore different types of video essays spanning a plethora of topics and interests. All the work we do is help students gain the information and skills to create their own individual video essay which you will construct and present to the class before the end of the year.

Each person participating, me included, is expected to create one video essay by the end of the year. We will break down how to do this and
Four Main Types of Essay

World Building
Debbie Kuttner, S1 FALL 2022-23
Room 220 Debbie's room : Tue/Thu 12:35-14:05

LA - 10A World LIT & COMP / 0.5

Let’s create worlds. On Tuesdays, students will engage in their own world building project that will last the whole semester. They will be guided via written feedback and one-on-one teacher meetings where teacher and student will build and asses their path to competencies together. On Thursdays, the whole class will engage in building one world together, which will involve collaboration for creation as well as creations that then will be collaborated upon. Students will be expected to read, sometimes with ears, sometimes with eyes, and sometimes with both. Students will be expected to write, sometimes with mouth, and sometimes with fingers, and sometimes via small group or whole class. Students will be expected to read at least one book for the semester, more if they are seeking honors credit and/or above LA10b credit.
Some things that will happen: demonstrate understandings of how world building can be done in different genres (specifically science fiction, fantasy, and realistic fiction, as well as others); apply writing styles, mediums, modes of different genres through classroom activities. Students will demonstrate their ability to read with eyes, ears, and other modalities. students develop reading goals, perform them, and reflect on their veracity. Students will learn about different ways to prepare to and tell stories. by employing multiple modes of story telling—through in-class activities, and through one personal semester-long project as well as some class and small group projects (to be determined by the class).

Write your heart out
Debbie Kuttner, S1 FALL 2022-23
Room 220 Debbie's room : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:35-14:05

LA - 10A World LIT & COMP / 0.5

There is an art to writing for yourself. Some call it narrative essay, some call it blogging, or journalling or sometimes it’s just about getting your ideas out there onto the interwebs and sharing your thoughts about music, movies, books, video games, politics, art, etc. In this class students will learn how to communicate via the written word. There will be opportunities for writing reviews, interviews, research, narratives. short stories, novels, poetry, and more. There will be prompts to work from, structure when needed, feedback, and lots of time to write and explore on your own. Once a month you will be asked to participate in a class slideshow that highlights what you’ve done via summary, example, or sharing it all. Come, write your heart out!

Language Arts / Fine Arts

BAM Poetry & Art - M/W/F
Melissa Park, S1 FALL 2022-23
Melissa's Room, 101 : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:45-11:55

ART - Multimedia 1 (EXP 2021) / 0.5; LA - Poetry / 0.5

This is a class about the power of language to heal, to incite, to inform, to describe, to express feelings. It has two main goals: to practice reading/interacting with poetry for meaning and purpose, and to write your own poems. (“What are the words you do not yet have? What do you need to say?…”) Engage your senses to create and experience poems, develop/deepen your writing practice, revise/edit, and voluntarily share your process/work in a poetry space we create with each other. We aim to connect again with Youth Speaks Seattle through possible guest teacher visits and/or (voluntarily) participating in YSS’s writing circle and/or slam series.

Major goals for the class are turning in a portfolio of original poems written this semester AND a portfolio of your interactions with, analyses of other people’s poems. As often as we can safely do so, we’ll take walking trips in the surrounding area to engage with and learn from/with our local environments and locales. Students will lead mini-seminars on reading or writing activities. More details posted here asap.

Playwriting
Brian Neel, S1 FALL 2022-23
RM B Dance Room : Tue/Thu 10:25-11:55

LA - Creative Writing / 0.5

Facilitator: K. Brian Neel

Students in this class can receive either LA-Creative Writing credit or FA-Theatre 8/Playwriting credit.

This playwriting class will equip you with tools for creative self-expression, endowing self-confidence and the sense that ideas—about yourself, the world, and the challenges you face—matter. Your voice will be heard. All aspects of writing for the theater will be explored, including character, story, conflict, genre, driving action through dialogue, and the power of the unspoken word. There will be much improvisation and game-play. We will write quickly and fearlessly in an atmosphere of risk taking, with positive and constructive feedback.

Language Arts / Social Studies

Abolition in Action & Book Club - T/Th
Melissa Park, S1 FALL 2022-23
Melissa's Room, 101 : Tue/Thu 12:35-14:05

LA - Ethnic Studies Am Lit Comp 11A / 0.5; SS - Ethnic Studies US11A / 0.5; SS - Ethnic Studies WH-2 / 0.5

starting ideas for the class, from Nikkita Oliver’s essay, “A Handbook for Abolitionists”

“…We replicate the behaviors around us. Challenging the status quo, even in conversation, even with our mothers, is hard and requires courage. To question deeply entrenched beliefs and values about each other and ourselves to dismantle massive, violent systems requires tenacity and the readiness to understand the difference between responding to the world and reacting.”

“…But some of us don’t always have the space to respond rather than react. In fact, many of us with the knee of oppression on our necks learn to keep secrets or to just keep moving through unresolved harm and trauma in order to survive. The systems around us were built to keep some people in perpetual survival mode. They were built to keep us trapped, reacting to harm rather than responding in ways that heal and prevent harm.”

“…[Patrisse] Cullors writes, ‘Abolition is about how we respond to harm caused and how we respond when we cause harm.’ Abolition is stopping the cycle of reaction and creating space to respond with care and dignity.”


This is an ethnic studies history/language arts class for anyone interested in learning more about historical and/or current abolition practices. We will craft the class together around student questions and goals. Expect to read/listen to/watch stimulating fiction, non-fiction, poetry, films, podcasts, and art that we curate and share with each other to humanize research, places, structures, and our entangled histories/stories. More details posted here asap.

—> Suggested starting goals (are not limited to these):

  • reduce and prevent harm at school, and in our lives
  • increase student well-being, through individual and collective creative and healing practices
  • develop and deepen practice of problem-solving, social, and communication skills, through various collabs in/out of class
  • practice cycles of reflection and action to make real the school climate and culture that we envision together
  • practice community at and outside of school
  • optional, related action component: students may participate in being trained (by a rad outside facilitator) to facilitate restorative justice circles with staff and students at Nova. We will meet as the new Circle Keepers committee on Weds, 10:00-10:40 in Annie’s Room, 114.

Crit/Ham - M/W/F
Melissa Park, S1 FALL 2022-23
Melissa's Room, 101 : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:35-14:05

LA - Ethnic Studies Am Lit Comp 11A / 0.5; SS - Ethnic Studies US11A / 0.5

Can we, and/or why should we, be critical of art we may enjoy or even love? What responsibility does art / do artists have—if any?—to uphold what actually happened according to historical records?

Join Meesh and Melissa for a deep dive into critically analyzing “Hamilton, the Musical,” and hidden histories of so many of the world’s peoples left out of the dominant narratives of the founding of the United States. We will explore history as a series of constructed arguments based on chosen evidence by historians (and/or storytellers), and how and why these constructed narratives often contain troubling patterns of omissions, diversions, and mistruths.

Can art and/or history be a tool for liberation? or oppression? or both? How does history as a discipline make claims about the nature of the past? and what are the benefits and limitations of the current ways history as a discipline constructs human knowledge?

What kind of representation matters in the media of people’s/our own multiple-ways-of-identifying, complex selves, and/or our interconnectedness in what we have/don’t have in society, and/or how we got here?

Additional goals for this ethnic studies class are to engage in collaborative practices of critical reading/thinking/discussions of how history is told/re-told in public spaces, what shapes public memory (and/or amnesia), and how do/can we see ourselves in history? Students will assess examples of historical monuments and/or narratives in public spaces, and design, research, create, and share their own public memory action project.

Deconstructing the American Dream
Ricardo Wemiz, S1 FALL 2022-23
114 : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-9:55

LA - Critical Lit & Social Inquiry / 0.5; SS - US History 11A / 0.5

Deconstructing the American Dream through Immigrant Stories

The United States presents itself as a land of opportunity where all you need to succeed is to pick yourself up by your bootstraps and work for it, but is this the truth?

In this class we will be tackling this question head on through the lived experience of those people in history who have braved the journey to immigrate to this country to try their hands at the American experiment. All while comparing their lived reality to what the dominant narratives in this tell us about the American Dream and immigrant/immigration.

In addition to lending an ear to their stories, we will be shifting our eyes and also examine the context from which their stories were created, all to answer the questions Is the American Dream real? What can we learn about the reality from the American Dream through the lived experiences of those who try to make that dream a reality?

The class will be broken down into 4 major sections around the following themes/time periods/
Explore the Dominant Narratives around the American Dream
Define Immigration & Explore Dominant Narratives around Immigration
1600-1900 Waves of immigration: Irish & African
1900-2000 Waves of immigration: Cuban & Cambodian
Immigration today: Latin America, Middle East

Spooky Testimonios & Cuir Platicas
Julia Reade, S1 FALL 2022-23
Room 204 and beyond the walls of Nova

None assigned

CONTENT/TRIGGER WARNING
We will be reading, viewing, listening to, and otherwise engaging with the macabre, gory, spooky, and otherwise dark themes. Mwahaha! This may include but is not limited to ghosts, monsters, psychological thrillers, and themes that turn the stomach, boggle the mind, make the skin crawl, and send shivers down the spine. Please do not enroll in this course if this sort of material tends to upset you.

In this course, we will be exploring gothic and horror Latin American fiction, their common themes and queer subtexts. We will look at all types of media, from traditional texts to graphic novels to performance art to videos…and more! The semester-long project culminates in a cultural ethnography portfolio. Students will learn and practice the steps needed to be successful at this throughout the semester. There will be an expectation of community engagement outside of our classroom. There will be opportunities to earn third year Spanish, language arts, and/or possibly ethnic studies credit.

Given our emphasis on community and out of respect for the learning space and others, we ask that cell phones and other distracting electronics are stored at all times unless otherwise specified. If this is difficult for you or you have specific accommodations that allow for certain technology, please discuss this with us before registering for the course.

Underreported Stories - M/W/F
Melissa Park, S1 FALL 2022-23
Melissa's Room, 101 : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-9:55

LA / 0.5; SS - US History 11A / 0.5; WHist / 0.5

According to the Pulitzer Center, underreported [news] stories are ones that point at the systemic causes of the crises we face and are often overlooked by the media. They might take time and effort to report, and/or they may be costly to produce. They often center voices that have historically been marginalized and are stories that seek to hold the powerful accountable.

In this class we (Meesh & Melissa) propose to work with questions students generate about current events/history and/or others such as:

  • What are underreported stories? What are the elements and journalism skills that are used to tell an underreported story?
  • How do underreported stories help us understand pressing issues in new ways?
  • How can underreported stories help us practice critical thinking, connection, and communication skills?
  • How can underreported stories inspire us/people to inform themselves, practice empathy, and take informed action?

We will make local and personal connections to global issues that matter most to us in the class, and explore publishing/sharing our work through creating pieces for local print, radio, and/or podcast media and/or related action projects.

Mathematics

Adulting
Rea Biddle, S1 FALL 2022-23
122 : Tue/Thu 10:45-11:55

MA - Algebra 1A / 0.5

As we transition ourselves from young people who are reliant on our parents into young adults on our own, some of you for the first time, this class will help prepare you for some of the things you will be expected to take on as life transitions from childhood to adulthood. In this class we will look into the reality that is taking care of ourselves and what our basic needs are as human beings. You will have an opportunity to explore resources for mental and medical healthcare, how to balance your incoming and outgoing expenses, financial literacy amongst other things. This class is ideal for students with basic math, real life math, and financial math goals.

Basic Math credit or Elective credit given.

Algebra 1A
Lance Brown, S1 FALL 2022-23
room 221 : Tue/Thu 8:45-9:55

MA - Algebra 1A / 0.5

25 STUDENT MAXIMUM

This is the first semester of Algebra I. This course is appropriate for any students who are interested in taking it, regardless of whether they feel confident in math or not. In addition to learning the fundamentals of algebra, we’ll be devoting weekly class time to developing number sense, mathematical inquiry skills, and pattern recognition. Additional support time is available outside of class for students who would like additional help or more advanced challenges.

This class will cover 5 areas:
1. Numbers and Properties
2. Variables and Equations
3. Intro to Functions
4. Linear Functions
5. Linear Functions, Part II

In addition to the mathematics content, students are expected to

  • listen with respect to another person’s explanation;
  • provide help when asked;
  • ask for help when needed;
  • play an active role in sustaining a safe and encouraging learning space for one another; and
  • treat all materials gently so that they may be reused.

Algebra 1A
Catherine Cougan, S1 FALL 2022-23
room 207 : Tue/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

MA - Algebra 1A / 0.5

This is the first semester of Algebra I. This course is appropriate for any students who are interested in taking it, regardless of whether they feel confident in math or not. In addition to learning the fundamentals of algebra, we’ll be devoting weekly class time to developing number sense, mathematical inquiry skills, and pattern recognition. Additional support time is available outside of class for students who would like additional help or more advanced challenges.

This class will cover 5 areas:
1. Numbers and Properties
2. Variables and Equations
3. Intro to Functions
4. Linear Functions
5. Linear Functions, Part II

Unit 1: Numbers and Properties
a. Simplify numeric expressions using integers
b. Simplify numeric expressions using fractions
c. Simplify numeric expressions using exponents and radicals
d. Use the correct order of operations to simplify expressions
e. Convert between units
f. Demonstrate understanding of the commutative property
g. Demonstrate understanding of the associative property
h. Demonstrate understanding of the distributive property

Unit 2: Expressions and Variables
a. Evaluate algebraic expressions
b. Translate between written and algebraic expressions
c. Solve one-step equations
d. Solve two-step equations
e. Solve equations with variables on both sides
f. Simplify algebraic expressions by combining like terms
g. Simplify algebraic expressions by using the distributive property
h. Solve word problems involving equations

Unit 3: Functions
a. Identify whether a relation is a function
b. Use a function to generate a table
c. Accurately plot ordered pairs on a coordinate plane
d. Identify the domain and range of a function from a graph or table
e. Evaluate functions from an equation
f. Evaluate functions from a table
g. Evaluate functions from a graph
h. Interpret the graph of a function within a real life context

Unit 4: Linear Functions
a. Identify the recursive rule for a linear equation
b. Identify the explicit rule for a linear equation
c. Write a linear equation in slope-intercept form
d. Determine slope and intercepts from a graph
e. Determine slope and intercepts from two ordered pairs
f. Determine slope and intercepts from an equation
g. Graph a linear equation

Unit 5: Linear Functions, Part II
a. Identify if a function is linear or non-linear
b. Identify if an ordered pair is a solution to a linear equation
c. Write a linear equation if given a graph
d. Write a linear equation from a scenario
e. Write a linear equation in point-slope form
f. Interpret the meaning of the slope and y-intercept within a scenario
g. Predict how a graph will change if the slope or y-intercept changes
h. Tell whether two lines are parallel, perpendicular, or neither

Algebra 2A - Section 1 (MWF 8:45)
Catherine Cougan, S1 FALL 2022-23
207 : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

MA - Algebra 2A / 0.5

This is the first of two semesters of Algebra 2. This course is appropriate for any students who are interested in taking it, and have taken geometry; it is the 3rd course in the math sequence at Nova. In addition to reviewing the fundamentals of algebra, we’ll be learning about a host of new functions. The main focus will be how to use functions in real-life situations!

Our class will spend time on mathematical inquiry skills, mechanical skills, and how to apply these ideas to real life problems in engineering, science, and student-driven areas of interest.

There will be about 2 hours of homework/studying per week. Be prepared to practice your math skills and collaborate on projects. We will also follow the 8 absence attendance policy, which will help keep you on top of things in this class.

This class will cover the following areas:

  • Re-acquainting with linear functions and mathematical thinking
  • Quadratics
  • Polynomials
  • Rational exponents & Radical functions

In addition to the mathematics content, students are expected to

  • Listen with respect to another person’s explanation
  • Engage in discussion
  • Communicate ideas both informally and formally
  • Provide help when asked
  • Ask for help when needed;
  • Play an active role in sustaining a safe and encouraging learning space for one another
  • Treat all materials gently so that they may be reused.

Competency Completion
Lance Brown, S1 FALL 2022-23
Rm 221 : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:35-14:05

MA - Algebra 1A / 0.5; MA - Algebra 1B / 0.5; MA - Geometry A / 0.5; MA - Geometry B / 0.5

These spaces are subject specific – students who require missing competencies in one or more classes WITHIN ONE SUBJECT will meet ONCE A WEEK with a teacher – these are not drop in spaces, but regularly scheduled sessions to complete competencies specific to previously taken classes with missing competencies or to complete portfolios within the subject

While building content competencies, students will also develop their skills of:
Perseverance
Communication/Relationship
Modeling
Building Connections

Financial Algebra
Lance Brown, S1 FALL 2022-23
Live online - scheduled meetings : Tue/Thu 12:35-14:00

MA - Financial Algebra 1 / 0.5

Max for Class 25

We will learn the everyday skills adults need to establish a budget, bank, save and borrow money, and pay local and national taxes. At the same time, we will be exploring the finances of the country. Just as we look at our own budgets, we will explore the topic of balancing the federal budget and learn about the issues that surround the federal deficit. As we explore the distinction between “wants” and “needs” in our own budgets, we will examine the choices our own country makes in its military spending. As we explore the way taxes are taken out of paychecks (FICA) we will look at the structure and sustainability of Social Security and Medicare. We will explore income tax models comparing fixed-amount taxation to flat/proportional taxes, to the progressive tax model. We will be using VR headsets for some of our work.

This is a math course for students who learn best by doing. It has been designed for those who “think with their hands” and who like to use math in real situations from the get go. We will do many labs and short term projects in this course. In addition to the math, we will be working throughout on problem solving skills, communication skills, and the ability to work on a team, the three attributes employers say are the most important to them.

Financial Algebra 1 is the first semester of a year-long course for students who have completed Algebra I and Geometry. This course can serve as the third credit of math for students who elect to take an alternative for the third year requirement through a counselor supported approval process. This course is also appropriate for students who have completed Algebra 2 and want to take a course specifically focusing on the mathematics of personal finance. The objectives of this course are not equivalent to the objectives for Algebra 2. Financial Algebra combines algebraic and graphical approaches with practical business and personal finance applications. Students explore algebraic thinking patterns and functions in a financial context. Students achieve success by offering an applications based learning approach incorporating Algebra 1, Algebra 2, and Geometry topics, and by connecting math to the real world. This course is designed to build upon prior knowledge of math concepts from other courses. This algebra-based course features real-world algebra concepts found in banking, credit, income taxes, insurance, and household budgeting. Step-by-step strategies will help students learn the time value of money, how to evaluate the purchases and consumer contracts, and how to build a business plan by knowing costs, profits, and break even points.

Geometry 1A (10:45 MORNING M/W/FR)
Lance Brown, S1 FALL 2022-23
room 221 : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:45-11:55

MA - Geometry A / 0.5

Your attendance and participation will be a factor in the assessment of your competency.

25 STUDENT MAXIMUM

Geometry 1A (8:45am-Mon/Wed/Fri)
Lance Brown, S1 FALL 2022-23
room 221 : Mon/Wed/Fri 08:45-09:55

MA - Geometry A / 0.5

25 STUDENT MAXIMUM

Liberatory Math in Society
Lydia Wynn, S1 FALL 2022-23
207 : Tue/Thu 12:35-14:05

MA - Math in Society (CIHS) A / 0.5

THIS IS A DUAL ENROLLMENT CLASS, YOU CAN RECIEVE HIGH SCHOOL AND COLLEGE CREDIT

The goal of this class is to explore mathematics from an Ethnic Studies lens where we:

  • examine our own (and ancestral) Identities and Agency as mathematicians,
  • understand the origins and indigeneity of mathematical thought and problem solving,
  • recognize and challenge the power and oppression that has presented itself in mathematical language, data manipulation, and informational gatekeeping
  • find ways to use mathematical learning as a tool for resistance and liberation, and create plans for action moving forward.

Math
Rea Biddle, S1 FALL 2022-23
Room 122 : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-9:55

IEP - Basic Math 1A M / 0.5

This is a project based math class that focuses on students specific IEP goals. students will have the opportunity to brainstorm projects to be worked on for the semester as well as given time to practice their skills with games and functions that support our learning. This class is invite only and open to students with Math IEP goals.

Precalculus A
Lydia Wynn, S1 FALL 2022-23
114 : Tue/Thu 10:25-11:55

MA - Pre-Calculus A / 0.5; MA - Pre-Calculus A H / 0.5

THIS IS A DUAL ENROLLMENT CLASS, YOU CAN RECIEVE HIGH SCHOOL AND COLLEGE CREDIT

In Precalculus we will be building from the mathematics learned in previous classes (Algebra and Geometry) to take an analytical approach to functions, patterns, and mathematical models. In this first semester we will focus on building strength around Functions from a Calculus perspective and how to recognize those functions in the world around us.

Course Goals

  1. Describe, model, and manipulate a variety of situations by connecting these situations to different functions and their properties in order to apply a mathematical lens to the world around you.
  2. Investigate function behaviors by exploring key features and possible changes of functions in order to build connections accross multiple mathematical tools
  3. Solve problems involving triangles by applying trigonometric ratios and identitites in order to utilize these mathematical tools in physical space
  4. Prove identities and theorems by applying trigonometric and mathematical logic in order to strengthen ability to justify reasoning and communicate mathematical truths
  5. Represent/model objects moving in physical space by exploring behaviors and properties of vectors in order to build connections across content areas
  6. Solve large systems of equations by storing information and using matrix properties in order to simplify complex problem solving scenarios
  7. Find patterns in alternative visual/graphic representations by graphing conic sections, parametric equations, polar coordinates, and complex numbers in order to expand visual understanding of the world
  8. Uncover patterns in various populations by analyzing probability distributions and statistical regression dat in order to make informed decisions about societal status and communicate need for change
  9. Solve introductory Calculus problems by applying previous learning in order to understand initial Calculus way of thinking

Physical Education

Nova Sports Committee
Julia Reade, S1 FALL 2022-23
Nova Room 201

PE - Team Sport 1 / 0.25

This committee will focus on developing, planning and playing sports at Nova. Kira, the committee’s founding student, will lead ultimate frisbee, but we will play and plan other activities as well. Students are invited to attend Tuesday and/or Thursday.

Peace of Mind
Stefan Gruber, S1 FALL 2022-23
205 : Tue 9:40-10:20

PE - Lifetime Activities 1 / 0.25

Peace of Mind is a community run meditation and mindfulness space, where we will explore a variety of calming techniques.

Self-Directed Map My Fun
Julia Reade, S1 FALL 2022-23
Room 201 and Outside : Tue/Thu 8:45-9:55

PE - Individual/Dual Activity 1 / 0.5

IMPORTANT This semester Map My Fun is self-directed. This means we will meet at the beginning of each class, but then students will complete their daily activity independently. Map My Fun will utilize a fitness tracking app, Strava, and our own two feet. No phone? No problem! No feet? Also no problem. However, we will be outside mapping our fun rain or shine.

Did you know you can draw using the satellites in space? True story! We’ll use maps, technology, and our own two feet to create images. Walk a heart around King’s Deli, spell “Nova” on the Garfield grass field, or jog a dead rat as a tribute to your school. By mapping your phone, you will demonstrate physical fitness learning objectives towards our school competencies.

Learning Objectives:
1. Demonstration of motor skills and movement patterns
2. Application of concepts, principles, strategies, and tactics related to movement patterns and performance
3. Recognition of the value of physical activity for health, enjoyment, challenge, self-expression, and social interaction
4. Exhibition of responsible personal and social behavior that respects self and others
5. Demonstration of the knowledge and skills to achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of physical activity

Science

Balms not Bombs Freshfolks
Eyva Winet, S1 FALL 2022-23
120 : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:35-14:05

SC - Physical Science (EXP 2021) / 0.5

Did you every want to make shampoo, cosmetics, sour dough start, inks, paper, dye, candles, soap, perfume, balms, salves, tinctures, pickles, kombucha? Did you know that you could learn about scientific inquiry, biology and chemistry by making these cool things? Have you ever thought you would like to understand what all those weird chemicals were on the back of your sunscreen? Have you ever thought you might want to start your own business making things? Have you ever wanted to make gifts for your loved ones instead of supporting giant corporations? Have you ever thought, “I could really live more simply and use less resources if I just made this myself”? If you can answer yes to any of these questions you might want to join the adventure that is BALMS NOT BOMBS! This course is cotaught with Becky, an art teacher, who will help students earn art credit as well as science credit for this course.

Gaian Ecology (Sci/WA)
Adam Croft, S1 FALL 2022-23
room 202 : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:35-14:05

SC - Ecology 1 / 0.5

How does the Earth live as an interconnected set of relations between living and non-living beings? How can such an understanding help us confront the global and local challenges we face today? These and related questions will guide our whole-class inquiry while each students takes on their own inquiry into the workings of our living Earth, sometimes known as Gaia.

We will also develop field ecology skills as students engage individual and group inquiries into the workings of local ecosystems and other relations between living beings.

Life on Earth
Susan Barth, S1 FALL 2022-23
Susan's Room B03 : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:45-11:55

SC - Biology B / 0.5

Life on Earth

Students will explore the science and history of life on Earth. Students will be expected to develop a broad understanding of the dynamics of life on Earth while also taking on an inquiry and teaching project exploring a particular aspect of Earth’s life.

Competencies: Inquiry_ Action_ Communication

Students will meet competency in Life on Earth by demonstrating that they can successfully:
- ask relevant questions and evaluate the connections between different questions in issues pertaining to the course’s areas of focus;
- gain knowledge and communicate understanding of biology, including definitions of and requirements for life, biological evolution, ecological systems, and understanding the relations of biotic and abiotic factors;
- design, carry-out, assess, and communicate field and/or laboratory experiments;
- practice sustained observation of an organism and/or habitat, including intentional use of imagination in support of perception;
- design, carry-out, and communicate (in writing, orally, graphically, and other media) research, including scientific, historical, and civics;
- take action at different scales of influence, including self, home, neighborhood, city, and beyond;
- communicate effectively, including through teaching peers, leading short courses and workshops, educating the public, organizing the community, writing, public speaking, the arts, and other media;
- reflect upon learning and actions through different media, including writing, visual arts, music, theater, etc.

Scope and sequence:
I. What is life? How do we answer such a question? [research, classify, design]
a. Zones of exploration
i. Definition of life;
ii. Requirements for life;
iii. Classification of life.
b. Project: Design a viable creature.
II. How do organisms live together? How do we study these interactions? [research, observe, design, experiment]
a. Zones of exploration
i. Ecological relations
ii. Human-induced changes.
b. Project: Design and conduct a field study.
III. How do organisms change over time? How do we know? [research, scheme]
a. Zones of exploration
i. Evolution by natural selection;
ii. Examples of evolution;
iii. Human evolution.
b. Project: Plausible evolution of creature.
IV. Biology EOC: practice and review
V. Final reflection:
a. What have you accomplished?
b. What have you learned?
c. What are you still pondering?
d. What are you still struggling over?
e. What will you take with you from this experience?

Physics
Catherine Cougan, S1 FALL 2022-23
120 - The Laboratory : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:30-11:55

SC - Physics A / 0.5

This is the first of two semesters of physics. This course is appropriate for any students interested in taking it, would like a science credit, and has completed algebra 1. This class focuses on relationships present in the natural world around us and modeling observations.

There will be math, some labs, and research projects. If you hate these things this is not the class for you. If you like theories of the universe, time travel, questions of reality and perception, energy, movement, matter, and how civilizations across times/places modeled the physical world, this class is for you. We will focus on de centering the dominant European narrative around physics, and focusing on work through critical narratives.

Our class will spend time on scientific inquiry skills, mechanical skills, conducting and evaluating lab experiments, and how to apply these ideas to real life problems in engineering, science, and student-driven areas of interest.

Most of the coursework is designed for you to be able to complete during class time. Be prepared to practice your skills and collaborate on projects. We will also follow the 8 absence attendance policy, which will help keep you on top of things in this class.

Semester Roadmap
Unit 1: Force
Unit 2: Motion/ Kinematics
Unit 3: Energy
Unit 4: Wave Properties

Science Projects
Susan Barth, S1 FALL 2022-23
B03 : Tue/Thu 12:35-14:05

SC - Biology A / 0.5

This class will include, scientific questioning, inquiry based science, research, modeling of systems and creating experiments, studies and projects. You will hone your experimental skills, creating experiments to further your learning and expand your mind. Inquiry and scientific questioning will be a focus, building experimentation, research, creating reports on experiments and studies. You will observe the world and create studies surrounding these observations. You will collaborate with classmates and share your knowledge. Come explore your interests.

Seminar

Learn! (With Lydia and Adam)
Adam Croft, S1 FALL 2022-23
202 (Adam's Room) : Tue/Thu 8:45-9:55

LA - Critical Lit & Social Inquiry / 0.5; SS - Humanities H (Inquiry Project) / 0.5

  1. Give you, as learners, the skills and knowledge to help you recognize what learning means in and out of formal learning contexts
  2. Liberate you, as learners, from the systemic belief that intelligence is fixed
  3. Give you, as learners, the opportunity to claim ownership over your learning and learning structures you experience, including within this and other Nova learning environments.
  4. Possibly – Contribute to competency work that is used on a school-wide basis.
  5. Possibly – Prepare for creating/teaching a class at Nova

Social Studies

Action Inquiry (AGE)
Adam Croft, S1 FALL 2022-23
room 202 : Tue/Thu 10:45-11:55

SS - American Government & Economics / 0.5

Note: This course is primarily intended for students seeking American Government & Economics (AGE) credit, but can also be a vehicle for practicing and demonstrating World History (WH) competencies for WH credit.

This is a project-based course in which students will develop their own inquiry process into the workings (and not workings) of civic and other institutions of power, including exploring and developing your own relation to public and private power.. We will also regularly engage in whole-class activities, including readings, discussions, films, guest speakers, and activities suggested and/or led by students.

This course will focus upon developing skills in research, writing, discussion, and civic action. Students seeking World History credit will emphasize development of the practices of historical inquiry, including posing authentic inquiry questions, analyzing dominant and critical narratives, identifying and accessing relevant sources of information, and synthesizing research into historical understanding through writing and discussion. Students seeking American Government & Economics (AGE) credit will practice these same skills of historical inquiry while developing skills for critical participation in democratic governance and other tools for accessing/confronting systems and structures of power.

This course will enroll a maximum of 35 students.

Dis/Crit History - T/Th
Melissa Park, S1 FALL 2022-23
Melissa's Room, 101 : Tue/Thu 10:25-11:55

SS - Ethnic Studies WH-2 / 0.5

This Ethnic Studies class — co-taught by Meesh & Melissa — focuses on how disabilities can be seen as cultural, historical, or and political experiences, with the purpose being to learn about the social norms that support, stigmatize, or define disabilities and more than that to take what we learn outward into our school and communities through activism, inquiry and change.

Freshfolks, Future Visions (WH/Sci/WA)
Adam Croft, S1 FALL 2022-23
room 202 : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-9:55

SS - World History 3 / 0.5

In this section of Freshfolks, we will develop a working understanding of Nova’s community processes and supports while also building essential academic skills for your success at Nova and beyond.

The following description details some of the themes and skills we’ll focus upon, this semester.

What future would you like to help create? How can historical and scientific understanding help us to make sense of the present so as to create a just and humane future? In a time of profound and over-lapping challenges to individuals, communities, nations, and the world at large, students in this course will develop and practice skills of historical and scientific inquiry to develop possibilities and pathways for the futures they would like to bring into being.

This course will focus upon developing skills in research, writing, discussion, and scientific inquiry. Students seeking World History credit will emphasize development of the practices of historical inquiry, including posing authentic inquiry questions, analyzing dominant and critical narratives, identifying and accessing relevant sources of information, and synthesizing research into historical understanding through writing and discussion. Students seeking Science credit will emphasize development of the practices of scientific inquiry, including skills in research, observation, experimentation, and communication. Students seeking WA State History credit will emphasize local topics within their historical and scientific inquiry.

This is a project-based course in which students will develop inquiry projects based upon their own particular questions and interests. We will also regularly engage in whole-class activities, including readings, discussions, films, guest speakers, and activities suggested and/or led by students.

World History Competencies

Students will engage in sustained student-centered and -driven inquiry, which will demonstrate their ability to:

Practice historical scholarship:
- pose meaningful questions, gain knowledge, and communicate understanding of historical inquiry, including racism, historical inequity, relevant policies, collective and individual actions to address injustice;
- critically analyze texts and people for their use of dominant narrative and implicit bias;
- research complex topics and articulate arguments that take into account multiple divergent points of view;
- find and evaluate primary and secondary resources for bias;
- engage in the writing process, including planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

Transform understanding into action in the world:
- identify, problem-solve, and take action toward a social justice challenge.

Participate in community scholarship and action:
- communicate effectively to a group of peers and elders their inquiry process, content, and creative outcome.

Science Competencies

Students will engage in sustained student-centered and -driven inquiry, which will demonstrate their ability to:

Practice scientific scholarship:
- pose meaningful questions, gain knowledge, and communicate understanding of natural and physical systems;
- design, carry-out, and communicate (in writing, orally, graphically, and other media) research, including scientific, historical, and civic.

Develop scientific practice:
- practice sustained observation of natural and physical systems, including intentional use of imagination in support of perception;
- design, carry-out, assess, and communicate field and/or laboratory experiments;
- model natural and physical systems and communicate understanding of both model and real-world systems.

Participate in community scholarship and action:
- communicate effectively to a group of peers and elders their inquiry process, content, and creative outcome.

Intro to Esports
Ricardo Wemiz, S1 FALL 2022-23
114 : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:45-11:55

SS - World History 1 / 0.5

Intro to Esports

Esports is an emerging new field of sports/entertainment which has been sweeping the world by storm. Scholars project that in the United States esports will have more viewers than every professional sports league but the NFL by 2021. They project that there will be 84 million viewers of esports, higher than the 79 million MLB viewers or the 63 million NBA viewers.

BUT WHAT IS IT EXACTLY?!?! Esports stands for electronic sports and is, to put it simply, professional competitive video game playing. In this class we will be tracing the history and growth of esports throughout the history of gaming. We will be exploring and discussing topics around Esports such as:
What is Esports and the history of it?
What games/communities comprise esports?
How did it become so popular?
What future possible career opportunities are in esports?
Other social justice topics as it pertains to gaming and esports.

Understanding Politics: Skills in Media Literacy
Ricardo Wemiz, S1 FALL 2022-23
114 : Tue/Thu 12:35-14:05

LA / 0.5; SS - American Government & Economics / 0.5

Understanding Politics: Skills in Media Literacy

The 2020 election was arguably the most important election in recent history. We observed record breaking turnout in the middle of a once in a century pandemic. However, the pandemic wasn’t the only problem voters faced. This year saw an uptick in the amount of disinformation around the pandemic. Disinformation in the media has always existed, however with the power of the internet, it can spread quickly and embed itself in the public thought.

The answer to combat this growing problem is Media Literacy. Media Literacy begins with skills and strategies to think critically about the news stories, images, and videos we see online. In our connected world, we encounter new information all the time, and there is no greater power than the ability to filter, discern, and wield that information.

In this class we will use these skills to break down major news stories and see firsthand how dominant narratives get created and spread. We will explore a number of topics around politics and the media including:
What are politics and media? & What are their roles?
Important questions to ask when facing new media
Addressing Bias and confirmation Bias
Modern political ideologies and movement
How to research and avoid conspiracy theories.

World Languages

Beginning ASL
Brent Hester, S1 FALL 2022-23
Room 204 : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-9:55

WL - ASL 1A / 0.5

Participants will explore different aspects of Deaf culture and learn American Sign Language. The students will learn linguistic patterns and applying them in various situations. The instruction is in American Sign Language. Students can ask questions pertaining to the language structure or ask clarifying questions. Teaching strategies are heavily focused on an immersion model. Students must be willing to engage with content and participate in class activities.

PHONES AND OTHER ELECTRONIC DEVICES WILL NEED TO BE PUT AWAY DURING CLASS UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED FOR SPECIFIC CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES.

VOICING IS NOT PERMITTED IN CLASS.

The content of the class will be Deaf culture and learning American Sign Language, which is the vehicle from which students will learn and practice language. In class students will be introduced to different aspects of Deaf Culture. Students will choose the lens from which they will study the Deaf culture so that they can make comparisons between the cultures and make comparisons with their own culture. Some suggested topics of focus (lens) for independent work may include:

*Deaf LGBTQ+ communities
*Deaf music/arts/literature/media
*accessibility
*hearing allies
*Deaf Technology
*Audism/Linguicism/Phonocentrism

  • Deaf cultural history
  • Deaf BIPOC topics
    *Careers using American Sign Language
    The content of the class will relate to culture, which is the vehicle from which students will learn and practice language. Themes to be reviewed and/or introduced may include:
    • Introductions
    • Describing self and others
    • Stating likes and dislikes
    • School
    • Food
    • Clothing
    • Hobbies
    ASL Music

Beginning Spanish
Brent Hester, S1 FALL 2022-23
Room 204 : Tue/Thu 10:25-11:55

WL - Spanish 1A / 0.5; WL - Spanish 1B / 0.5

This class is for beginning Spanish students; no prior experience with the language is required. Second year and more advanced students may join this class but must be willing to take on a leadership role, lead activities and model language usage in class.
PHONES AND OTHER ELECTRONIC DEVICES WILL NEED TO BE PUT AWAY DURING CLASS UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED FOR SPECIFIC CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES.
All world language classes will start with a session of introduction to Language Acquisition, taught in English. The goal of this part of the course is to provide students with an understanding of language acquisition and the learning process, and to empower them in their endeavor of mastering a new language by making them aware of the most effective strategies to be used for reaching that goal.
Throughout the semester participants will explore different aspects of Spanish/Latin American culture, learn vocabulary and linguistic patterns, and apply them in various situations. The instruction is in Spanish with occasional “English islands”. Teaching strategies are heavily focused on an immersion model. Students must be willing to engage with content and participate in class activities. Students will be expected to practice speaking and writing Spanish in class at their target level on a daily basis.

The content of the class will relate to culture, which is the vehicle from which students will learn and practice language. Themes to be reviewed and/or introduced may include:
• Introductions
• Describing self and others
• Stating likes and dislikes
• School
• Food
• Clothing
• Hobbies
• Music
• Travel

Intermediate/Advanced ASL
Brent Hester, S1 FALL 2022-23
Room 204 : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:45-11:55

WL - ASL 2A / 0.5

Participants will explore different aspects of Deaf culture and learn American Sign Language. The students will learn linguistic patterns and applying them in various situations. The instruction is in American Sign Language. Students can ask questions pertaining to the language structure or ask clarifying questions. Teaching strategies are heavily focused on an immersion model. Students must be willing to engage with content and participate in class activities.

PHONES AND OTHER ELECTRONIC DEVICES WILL NEED TO BE PUT AWAY DURING CLASS UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED FOR SPECIFIC CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES.

VOICING IS NOT PERMITTED IN CLASS.

The content of the class will be Deaf culture and learning American Sign Language, which is the vehicle from which students will learn and practice language. In class students will be introduced to different aspects of Deaf Culture. Students will choose the lens from which they will study the Deaf culture so that they can make comparisons between the cultures and make comparisons with their own culture. Some suggested topics of focus (lens) for independent work may include:

*Deaf LGBTQ+ communities
*Deaf music/arts/literature/media
*accessibility
*hearing allies
*Deaf Technology
*Audism/Linguicism/Phonocentrism

  • Deaf cultural history
  • Deaf BIPOC topics
    *Careers using American Sign Language
    The content of the class will relate to culture, which is the vehicle from which students will learn and practice language. Themes to be reviewed and/or introduced may include:
    • Introductions
    • Describing self and others
    • Stating likes and dislikes
    • School
    • Food
    • Clothing
    • Hobbies
    ASL Music

Intermediate/Advanced Spanish
Brent Hester, S1 FALL 2022-23
Room 204 : Tue/Thu 12:35-14:05

WL - Spanish 2A / 0.5; WL - Spanish 2B / 0.5

Students should have at least one year of Spanish prior to taking this class. This class is for students who are looking for focused time to work on their communication skills in Spanish. Emphasis will be on expanding vocabulary, practicing conversational skills and working on a project to present in class to meet competencies for Spanish 2B. All instruction will be in Spanish and all students in this class are expected to participate daily in all class discussions and activities. Students will present a project in Spanish at the end of the semester.
First year Spanish students may join this class but must be willing to do additional work outside of class to accelerate their learning so they can participate in this learning community.
PHONES AND OTHER ELECTRONIC DEVICES WILL NEED TO BE PUT AWAY DURING CLASS UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED FOR SPECIFIC CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES.
Learning Objectives
All world language classes will start with a session of introduction to Language Acquisition, taught in English. The goal of this part of the course is to provide students with an understanding of language acquisition and the learning process, and to empower them in their endeavor of mastering a new language by making them aware of the most effective strategies to be used for reaching that goal.
Throughout the semester participants will explore different aspects of Spanish/Latin American culture, learn vocabulary and linguistic patterns, and apply them in various situations. The instruction is in Spanish with occasional “English islands”. Teaching strategies are heavily focused on an immersion model. Students must be willing to engage with content and participate in class activities. Students will be expected to practice speaking and writing Spanish in class at their target level daily.

The content of the class will relate to culture, which is the vehicle from which students will learn and practice language. Themes to be reviewed and/or introduced may include:
• Introductions
• Describing self and others
• Stating likes and dislikes
• School
• Food
• Clothing
• Hobbies
• Music
• Travel

Planning and Course Design for French Studies at Nova
Brent Hester, S1 FALL 2022-23
Room 204 : Tue/Thu 8:45-9:35

UE - Student Activity (EXP 2021) / 0.5

The objective of this workshop is to design a French class for Nova High School. Students will be working with the teacher to choose topics, generate vocabulary, create materials and practice new language skills. Elective credit will be earned as default for participation and contributions to this project; potential to earn World Language credit for French will depend upon student’s language level and progress in acquiring language (for French credit see Learning Objectives and Competencies for World Language below).
Students will need to come ready to work, share ideas and try out new activities. This is not a class for passive participation; all students in this workshop will be expected to contribute and actively engage.
PHONES AND OTHER ELECTRONIC DEVICES WILL NEED TO BE PUT AWAY DURING CLASS UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED FOR SPECIFIC CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES.