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Career & Technical Education CTE)

Animation Induction (Level 1, 10th grade and up)
Stefan Gruber, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
205 Cloud Level Animation Lab : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:35-14:00

CTE - Graphic Design BEG / 0.5

Open to all people of all levels of artistic talent from none to godly. Animation is a different art from drawing, so no drawing skills are necessary, only braveness. We’ll be exploring many techniques including 2D puppet, pixelation, flipbooks, clay. It’s a lot of fun and really good exercise for the imagination. We’ll also watch a lot of animation in here to get inspiration and meet with guest animators who make artistic animation for a living.

Music Production
Allison Sterrett, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
105 : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:35-14:00

CTE - Recording Arts Tech 1 / 0.5

This class will be taught by student musicians JJ, Mateo, and Noah and hosted in Meesh’s classroom (105)

Class will be capped at 20 students.

During this class we will be exploring different levels and styles of music making, ranging from electronic music to acoustic music and recording. You don’t need to know how to make music already, you just need to be interested in learning! Possible areas of study: drum and sample selection, mixing and mastering a finished beat, how to structure a beat from a loop, sound design, music anthropology, general Ableton knowledge, music history, instrumental cadence, instrumental performance, music vocabulary, and much more

TECH NOTE: Students will be given access to Ableton software on their SPS laptop. Students must check out a district device unless they already have Ableton on their own personal device.

Nova Farm
Susan Barth, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Susan's Room #B3 and the Nova Farm : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:35-14:00

SC - ENV Horticulture 1 / 0.5

Plan to be outside and get dirty. In this class, will have both indoor and outdoor learning. You will experience botany, horticulture, farming, and social justice around food. You will work on the farm, cultivate crops, learn about social justice and environmental issues surrounding agriculture and food and do projects catered to your interests, including leadership, internships, and career paths. This spring, we will focus on seed starts and planting and caring for raised beds. Come learn how to use power tools. Grow stuff, the bees need you.

This is a CTE class that can cross credit with science. You can also earn college credit through South Seattle College if you take this class for a full year or meet extra competencies in one semester. Please discuss with Susan.

A graduation Social Justice Project could be done in this class.

Open Animation Portal
Stefan Gruber, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Room 205 : Mon/Wed/Fri 14:35-16:00

ART - Graphic Design ADV (Stefan Only) / 0.5

Open Portal is a way to extend your projects from other animation classes into a bigger project. For instance, if you have a 300 frame animation piece and want to color it, add shadows, and textures for a more professional feel, this is the place to do that. It also doubles as a place where you can be if you want extra time working on your assignments for Comics, Games, and Animation Class.

Sewing & Fiber
Susan Watters, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
B#20 : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:35-14:00

CTE - Apparel & Textiles I / 0.5

Generously sponsored by Foundry 10. Facilitator: Maria Bischof

All experience levels are welcome but be prepared to work in class, this is a “hands on” class.

We will read & create patterns, cut, serge, sew, iron.

Time Flies 1A-Semester 2-Mon/Wed/Fri
Jennifer Spigner, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
RM #B-20 : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

CTE - Career Conn-1 (JS Only) / 0.5

The world of careers has many paths to explore and also gain professional skills in the process.
Are you interested on how to find and keep a job?
Come to this class and you will become workplace ready to look for jobs and opportunities.

Identify careers based on assessments on interests and skills
Career Research
Identify personal skills, interests and abilities and relate them to current career choices.
Present information to class on career interests
Essential Careers during covid
Resume building
Interviewing Skills
21st Century Skills
Employment Law
Health and Safe in the workplace
Workplace Readiness Skills:Professionalism, Communication, Collaboration, Adaptability, Technical
Leadership and Community Skills

Time Flies 2A-Semester 2-Tues
Jennifer Spigner, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
RM #B-20 : Tue 8:45-10:10

CTE - Career Conn-2 (JS Only) / 0.5

*PRE-REQUISITES: Time Flies 1A AND Job or Internship

*Through hands-on experiences as an Wellness Ambassador role OR another current work based experience that will provide the opportunity to demonstrate your current workplace skills and continued growth in those skills.

Meet once a week to update on workplace skills and reflection for growth in your contributions while doing work based experience the other days of the week. Managing your time in your work and/or projects.

Continually exploring career paths as your interests change and develop.

Understand the skills and demonstrate them as you work on projects individually or collaboratively.

Through hands-on experience, guest speakers, research and exploration the student will discover a variety of career pathways for post-secondary educational choices and careers.

Students will understand the importance of Ambassador role expectations and demonstrate growth and your contribution in your community leadership role.

Workplace Readiness Skills: Professionalism, Communication, Collaboration, Adaptability, Technical
Leadership and Community Skills

Financial Literacy Skills such as budgeting, cost/benefit analysis, saving and credit.

Committee

Action Faction and Wellness Steering Committee
Eyva Winet, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
121 : Thu 2:05-2:45

SS - Student Government / 0.15

Action Faction Mission Statement:
As an all-inclusive committee, we work to create a safe and respectful community for all genders and sexualities. We combat sexuality and gender identity oppression by creating positive actions in Nova and beyond. Positive actions include maintaining safe spaces for discussions, resources and events. We believe that any social justice movement must work towards inclusion of other social justice goals. We recognize that all oppressions are connected and in no way do we want our actions to propagate other forms of oppression.

Wellness Steering Committee:
We will be meeting regularly with the folks running the new Nova Wellness Center to help build, improve and expand their services for Nova students and the community. We have already helped architects design the temporary space but will continue to advise for the permanent space. We have helped hire staff for the space but will also give feedback and support their understanding of Nova and our amazingly diverse students. We agreed to help them get student art and interesting pieces to decorate the space so we need folks who are willing to make or curate art. We will also be working on grant writing to get more services and expand the possibilities of what the wellness center can offer.

Join us! We need your voice to drive this work. Country Doctor is very happy to collaborate and take guidance from students so we need you all to show up and make this center truly work for youth!

There are opportunities to work on culminating inquiry projects, health credit, CTE credit, peer education, grant writing, internships in the health field connected to this committee!

Audiobook
Becky Laird, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
209 : Wed 2:05-2:45

UE - Personal Growth / 0.15

Audiobook is a weekly companion group to the monthly Intergenerational Book Group, where students can listen to recordings of the coming month’s selection. On its own, Audiobook is a great way to engage in the Nova literary community. It’s also a way to access the Intergenerational Book Group readings for any students who prefer listening to books.

This committee will be facilitated by Lisa C.

Band Committee - FRI
Melissa Park, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Band Room : Fri 2:05-2:45

UE - Student Activity (EXP 2021) / 0.1

Band is an offshoot of Sound Committee and is a place for students to learn and practice making music in groups with the goal of performance and the joy of learning and sharing music together.

Band Committee-Wednesday
Jared Harkness, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Band Room

None assigned

Band is an off shoot of Sound Committee and is a place for students to learn and practice making music in groups with the goal of performance and the joy of learning and sharing music together.

Budget/ Marketing & Fund. Rm 121 TUES 2:05pm
Lance Brown, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Rm 221 : Tue 2:05-2:45

SS - Student Government / 0.15

22 STUDENT MAXIMUM

This committee is responsible for the fiscal decisions of Nova. The Friends of Nova (formerly the PTSA) raises funds for student and teacher use. It’s the role of this committee to oversee the equitable distribution of these funds. Furthermore, Nova is the only school in the District that has the privilege of designating where and how our school budget is spent. This is the forum within which those conversations and decisions are made.

The learning goals of this committee are:
1. to learn how to read and interpret a fiscal spread sheet;
2. to participate in group decision making;
3. to engage in conversations about equity and opportunity within our community;
4. to provide a space where all students and school groups feel heard and valued and where their proposals are taken seriously;
5. to explore ways to communicate our decisions and dilemmas within the Nova community;
6. to observe and participate in a formal committee structure, including a mild form of Robert’s Rules of Order;
7. and to have the experience of facilitating the running of the committee.

Button Brigade - Tuesdays and Fridays (Governing Committee)
Reghan Biddle, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Rea's Room - 122 : Tue 2:05-2:45; Fri 2:05-2:45

SS - Student Government / 0.15

Button Brigade will work in collaboration with Action Faction and the rest of the Nova community to create buttons, posters, and flyers for Nova events and to help disseminate important information to the community.

Dungeons and Dragons
The Dark Knight Batman, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Rm 102 : Fri 2:05-2:45

UE - Student Activity (EXP 2021) / 0.25

This committee is devoted to playing the incredible role playing games that are out there. It doesn’t have to just be Dungeons and Dragons. Each Friday we will come together and play. Create a character! Run a campaign! No experience necessary at all. We will teach you how to play. Must be willing to get along with others (or be willing to learn how to), show up unless you have an incredibly good excuse, and certainly have the capacity to have fun.
Also, if you don’t have dice or source books, don’t worry about it. We have some extra you can borrow for the day.

Guild
Lydia Wynn, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
207 - Winnie's Room : Thu 2:05-2:45

SS - Student Government / 0.25

The purpose of guild is to promote events that strengthen the community involvement of Nova.
Students in guild will:
*Plan various events
*Support fundraisers
*Organize prom

  • Engage in the needs/desires of other Nova students.
    *Represent all student activities and interests.

Mothership
Michelle Vecchio, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
105

SS - Student Government / 0.15

Mothership supports all-school decision making and the committee system.

Nova Minecraft Gov. Committee Thu 2:05pm
Lance Brown, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Rm 221 : Thu 2:05-2:45

SS - Student Government / 0.25

22 STUDENT MAXIMUM

Students will participate in Nova Minecraft Project.
The students will recreate the Nova building in Minecraft.
When complete all students will be welcome to visit the Nova Minecraft Building.
This would give us some sense of community again.

Paper Making Committee
Adam Croft, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
room B-03 : Tue 2:05-2:45

UE - Leadership / 0.15

Help our school recycle paper within our building by learning to make paper from the pulpy remains of used paper. We’ll also make journals and other items with this Nova-made paper.

Planet Nova
Adam Croft, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
room 202 and beyond : Fri 2:05-2:45

UE - Leadership / 0.15

Let’s tend to our school’s relation to the Earth and each other, including through maintaining and strengthening our systems for composting, energy conservation, environmental justice, ecological awareness, and anything else we can do for our living community.

POC Committee
Melissa Park, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Melissa's room, 101 : Wed/Thu 2:05-2:45

SS - Student Government / 0.25

Note: We are now meeting on Weds & Thurs, starting in February. This governing committee, the People of Color Committee (POCC), is a meeting place for students and staff who identify as people of color to reconnect, affirm, and unapologetically be ourselves. We are especially focused on citizenship teaching and learning, building community in our shared spaces, developing and growing our leadership skills, and acting and reflecting on issues of race and equity in a safe and open environment.

Past projects have included our organizing of coat & warm clothing drives in the winter, field trips, pot-lucks, hosting movie nights, collaborating with local organizations, and programming teaching events for the school. Additionally, students rotate facilitation duties of weekly committee meetings & short- and long-term projects.

POCC is one of several governing committees which give input to Recruitment Committee and our administrators for Nova’s Mission/Vision C-SIP School Improvement Plan (an official document generated annually by Nova’s administrators that sets goals, enrichment, instructions programs, students’ achievement, and assessment of the school, and is published on our school’s SPS website.

PSA Committee/Mission Vision
Eyva Winet, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
B20 : Tue 13:50-14:30

SS - Student Government / 0.1

Learn to make PSA for the school. People with digital music, video editing, script writing, comedy and/or acting skills highly encouraged to join this committee.

Quiet Art Space (FRI 2:05)
Becky Laird, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Art Room (219) : Fri 2:05-2:45

ART - Exploring the Arts (EXP 2021) / 0.15

Calm Art Space is a weekly gathering space to connect with peers while working on individual art pieces. We will work together to offer weekly optional art prompts and supportive feedback.

Rocks, Plants and Stars
Eyva Winet, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
121 : Thu 2:05-2:45

SS - Student Government / 0.15

Miku and Les (and Eyva) will host this space.
This committee’s main focus is self care! Plants, rocks, tarot, and stars, we get together to talk about how and why we use and practice with these items of spirituality to better our wellbeing. As a society, we have a lot of negative and overwhelming issues constantly surfacing and i know a lot of people (myself included) who have felt this pressure inescapable. How are we to have a positive outlook or reset when all of these energy vampire situations are constantly in the forefront? Taking care of plants, hanging out with crystals, studying your astrological chart , are all things that help me when the world feels uncertain and clouded. I think it would be really cool to get together and share experiences with others who enjoy these things and to be able to have open communication about the ways we stay grounded in the midst of chaos. Anyone and everyone is welcome, those who know nothing about plants, rocks, and stars but are interested will have a safe place to converse and ask questions judgement free. We would get together every week and do fun self care projects, some ideas being building terrarium’s, lotions, lip balms, journals, jewelry… and the things that you are all interesting in too!

Safety
Annie Parker, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Room 114 : Tue 2:05-2:45

SS - Student Government / 0.25

Do you love being safe and care about the safety of our community? This committee will work to update the district safety plan, improve our disaster preparedness, be in charge of drills, review and evaluate emergencies and improve our process of addressing emergencies. We also work to manage shared public spaces at Nova, including outdoor spaces, helping resolve issues that make students, staff and/or the community feel unsafe, supporting restorative processes when Nova Norms are broken and physical or emotional safety is compromised.

Senior Committee
Adam Croft, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
room 202 : Thu 2:05-2:45

SS - Student Government / 0.15

Debbie will co-facilitate this committee!

We’ll plan and execute senior-oriented activities, supports, and events, especially our graduation ceremony (!!!), but also study sessions and anything else to help make everyone’s final year of high school successful and meaningful.

Sound Committee
Jared Harkness, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Band Room

None assigned

The sound committee runs the music makers’ space called The Band Room, supports all school events that need sound and music and improves access for all students interested in learning and making music. Band is responsible for cleaning, organizing, fixing and improving instruments and equipment in the music maker’s space and is working to grow music opportunities at Nova.

Thursday Recruitment spring 2022
Isabella Pagel, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Room 220 Debbie's room : Thu 2:05-2:45

SS - Student Government / 0.25

Recruitment Committee oversees the functioning of all recruitment-related activities here at Nova. In particular, this committee can make decisions that effect how Nova is going about bringing new students into our community as well as how we are perceived by those potential new recruits.

We need students in order to be a school! And we need people to know about Nova and want to come here in order to get those students! Basically, Recruitment is essential to the survival of Nova and all that we are doing here.

Decisions are made through consensus-building whenever possible.

Tuesday Recruitment spring 2022
Debbie Kuttner, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Room 220 Debbie's room : Tue 2:05-2:45

SS - Student Government / 0.25

Recruitment Committee oversees the functioning of all recruitment-related activities here at Nova. In particular, this committee can make decisions that effect how Nova is going about bringing new students into our community as well as how we are perceived by those potential new recruits.

We need students in order to be a school! And we need people to know about Nova and want to come here in order to get those students! Basically, Recruitment is essential to the survival of Nova and all that we are doing here.

Decisions are made through consensus-building whenever possible.

Video Game Social Committee
Julia Reade, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Room 201 : Fri 2:05-2:45

UE - Personal Growth / 0.25

This INVITE ONLY committee is a structured, student-lead committee designed to offer students an opportunity to further develop their social skills. The group will gather around a common interest—gaming—and engage in discussions about this topic.

Wednesday zoom orientations
Debbie Kuttner, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Zoom Rm 220 : Wed 2:05-2:45

UE - Leadership / 0.25

we will meet each week to orient perspective families and students to Nova. orientations will happen via zoom, so be sure to have your laptop with you

Yearbook
Susan Barth, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Rm 3- Susan : Thu 2:05-2:45

CTE - Publishing Yearbook 1 / 0.25

Yearbook will meet both Thursday’s in Susan’s Room B03, with Brent and Susan. We are looking for motivated, organized, creative types (you do not need to have all of those traits together). We want photographers, designers, and tech savvy folks to help us. We will capture the amazingness of our community. No experience necessary, just a willingness to contribute.

The basic credit is .25 per semester, depending on the amount of work you put in.

Elective

Chess and Variants
Stefan Gruber, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
205 Cloud Level Animation Lab : Wed 2:05-2:45

UE - Student Activity (EXP 2021) / 0.15

Your objective will be to improve your chess playing abilities, and learn some variations on the chess rules.

Enrichment

Get It Done
Michelle Vecchio, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
105

None assigned

Students will develop research and writing skills.
Students will actively read.
Students will respond critically to Constitutional issues, policies, legislation, and current events.

Students will engage in reflection on issues of social justice and equity.
Students will practice sustained commitment to an issue of their choice through self-education, volunteering, research, and community knowledge sharing.
Students will share out what they have learned with the Nova community and beyond to transform learning into action.

Meesh Indies
Michelle Vecchio, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
105

None assigned

Students will work on independents

Running Start Resource
Julia Reade, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22

None assigned

Fine Arts

ART INDEPENDENTS
Becky Laird, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Art Room (219) : Mon/Fri 2:50-4:00

ART - Art Survey / 0.5

Students will have the opportunity to identify areas of interest and work on developing their skills in this asynchronous class. Students will participate in weekly office hours with school staff to review progress, share resources, and set learning goals for the upcoming week. Additionally, students will develop some way to share their learning with the Nova community.

Independent contracts have specific competencies related to each contract. Students will meet with staff overseeing the contract and with content area specialists to ensure appropriateness of competencies. Independent contracts are an opportunity for students to seek out knowledge and skills independently with the collaborative support and guidance of school staff.

CLAY - Handbuilding ONLY (T/TH 10:30)
Becky Laird, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Art Room (219) : Tue/Thu 10:30-11:55

ART - Ceramics BEG / 0.5

This class if for students who have not yet taken pottery at Nova! This will be a handbuilding class ONLY (no wheel throwing this semester). The class will be limited to 16 students. Thinking/talking/sharing about your work is part of this class

Each week you will do (at least) three things for this class:
Make Something – Each week we will learn/practice a particular skill/technique and you will create a project that incorporates that skill or technique
Learn Something – Each week you will do a little research about a clay artist, technique, etc.
Share Something – Each week you will share what you have been working on with your classmates.

Short Play Performance
Brian Neel, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Dance Room : Tue/Thu 12:35-14:00

ART - BEG Theatre / 0.5

Students in this class can receive FA-Theatre 8 credit

This introductory course is for all students looking to develop skills in acting and performing. Public speaking, creative problem solving, and collaboration are explored through creative activities, voice and movement exercises, improvisation, creating character, and script analysis and scene study. No previous theatre experience necessary.

LEVELS OF CLASS:

- Participate in group theater games and acting exercises
- Memorize scripts

- Complete in-class performance exercises
- Participate in public performances
- Be Attentive and Respectful of others’ input and abilities

Fine Arts / Social Studies

Transformations (M/W 10:30)
Becky Laird, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Art Room (219) : Mon/Wed 10:30-11:55

ART - Art Survey / 0.5

Learn Something
—Elements of Art
—Art History
—History of Art

Make Something
—Mixed media opportunities
—Reflections and responses

Share Something
—Art sharing
—Community discussions and knowledge sharing

Health

Gender Tea
Eyva Winet, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
120 : Wed 2:05-2:45

UE - Personal Growth / 0.15

Gender Tea
Is the gender binary getting you down? How about the gender hierarchy? Tired of other people telling you what your identity is or should be or that your doing it wrong? Want to drink tea and chat with other rad people who want to talk about gender, sex and sexuality in a safe and supportive space? Want to imagine space where all bodies are safe, free and celebrated? Want to work toward creating that here and now? Everyone is welcome and encouraged to come as long as you can agree to the safety norms grown in the group.

Talk to Eyva about Health or other kinds of credit.

Health
Susan Barth, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Room #B3 : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:35-14:00

HE - Health Education HS / 0.5

We will be exploring deeper meaning and connections within your physical, mental and social well being and how to relate them to yourself, those close to you and your local and global communities. You will gain a holistic understanding of how to recognize when aspects of your health are out of balance, how to create safe practices surrounding your health and the choices you make. We will explore what is needed to keep your body, identity and community healthy. We will work on positive goal setting around your health and aspects that may affect it. You will create ways in which you can empower yourself in your own health and take positive action.

This class can also be part of a Graduation Pathway. You would be working with Careers and the Wellness Center.

You will need to complete the Health CBA as part of full credit. This is also a graduation requirement.

Communicating Ideas in Health
Students will be able to share and teach information that they have gathered on issues of importance for their own health.
Intro to the Adam Project, including Service Learning.
The student can create traditional presentations of information. i.e. research posters and/or presentations
The student can create non-traditional presentations of information. i.e. artistic responses, games, coloring books, comic books, technology, etc.
The student can communicate understanding to peers, experts and laypersons.
The student will use technology to communicate, educate and call to action for conservation projects. This will include websites, blogs, social media etc.

Language Arts

All the Letters I Never Wrote
Debbie Kuttner, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Room 220 : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

LA - 10B World LIT & COMP / 0.5

Through the art of letter writing, students will be invited to explore the realms of the world un-written to, and see more of themselves and others in the light of their own pen.
Unit 1: Learning our voice.
For students to get a sense of there voice in writing and examine how others have used the act of letter writing to convey emotion and stories once trapped inside.
Unit 2: Prompts and Journeys .
For students to start to play with writing and build some drafts in writing based off of the work they have read and letter inspiration they have.
Unit: 3 People Stories. For students to develop a complex understanding of the influence of people in their lives and expressing that influence in letter form.
Unit 4: Writing, Writing, Writing.
Students will practice writing stamina and what it means to be vigilant in the practice of writing letters
Unit 5: All the Letters I Never Sent.
Students will learn about the final project which is the production of the anthology and be involved in a community based approach of letter submission’

Blog and Read and Read and Blog
Debbie Kuttner, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Debbie's Room 220 : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:30-11:55

LA - Journalism Writing / 0.5

There is an art to writing for yourself. Some call it narrative essay, some call it blogging, or journalling or sometimes it’s just about getting your ideas out there onto the interwebs and sharing your thoughts about music, movies, books, video games, politics, art, etc. In this class students will learn how to communicate ideas to an audience. There will be opportunities for writing reviews, interviews, research, and narratives. Some students will step up to be peer editors, some to work on the technical side (wordpress is our platform); some students will choose to write weekly columns, or to be investigative reporters. We will make decisions as a community of learners, perhaps tying ourselves directly with committees or other Nova/community entities (like facilitating a space for the PTSA, coor groups, Douglas Truth library, and more).

Check out Fall 2021 semester slideshow and come and make it more of what it is, or something completely different.

Know
The Dark Knight Batman, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Room 102 : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:35-14:00

LA - 12B-H Comparative Lit & Comp / 0.5

THIS CLASS IS FOR JUNIORS AND SENIORS ONLY.

NO CELL PHONES IN THIS CLASS. IF YOU CAN’T DEAL WITH THAT DON’T TAKE THIS CLASS.

You are the experience.

Expect to work toward understanding your life.
Expect to speak a great deal in this class.
Expect to move.
Expect to read.
Expect to be there.
Expect to write.

Requirements:
1. No more than 6 absences. Beyond that will require extensive Content and Community Projects to make up for the competencies missed.
2. No cell phones. Pull out a cell phone without permission and you will receive an absence. Please take calls or send texts outside the room.
3. Complete all competencies.
4. Take responsibility for your education. If you miss a class, check in with me. Make sure you have access to Schoology and check it.

Naked Truth (LA, ES)
Melissa Park, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Melissa's room, 101 : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:30-11:55

LA - Ethnic Studies Am Lit Comp 11B / 0.5

The Naked Truth On Stereotypes is a language arts ethnic studies class focused on exercising voice, play, movement, growing confidence as writers, and creating and sustaining an art-based community space.

Our class goals are:

REFLECTION – deepen understanding of self & “other”
EXPLORATION – expose and debunk socially constructed myths of identity & stereotypes
CREATION – practice art to expand & amplify the collective creative power of community
CELEBRATION – celebrate our stories, all of them
ACTION – inspire & incite radical action to uproot systems of domination & dehumanization

Students will practice:
- co-creating and sustaining a writing community; learning actively from each other
- movement-based Theater of the Oppressed activities, games
- active listening; processes of reflection, action; mindfulness
- daily writing; writing to create one’s best work
- learning/using poetry tools in writing; exploring writing in different forms
- connecting our individual experiences to systemic issues; developing critical consciousness of historical forces on our present and the multilayered historical contexts of people “creating a way out of no way,” creating art, healing, and community, then and now.
- critically reading and responding to various texts/media on intersectional identities, kinship, indigeneity, and the role of the artist in society.
- challenging ourselves and others to think deeply and critically on class topics
- completing and sharing an individual inquiry project
- teaching/facilitating a lesson/seminar in class

This LA class is for students who are the most frequently “invisibilized,” marginalized, and/or vulnerable to harmful stereotyping in mainstream culture, media, public policy and/or at school. No poetry writing experience is necessary. Students will share their poems in a culminating performance for an audience.

“To claim a public voice is to summon our collective power, belly-deep and then bitter in our throats, a willful insistence that we matter—and we do matter, especially now…we write to drown out the silence.” Felicia Rose Chavez

Because so much of our competencies learning and practice takes place during in-person classes and through assignments grounded in activities from classes, a student missing more than 9 classes will need to complete makeup work for missed content and/or community scholarship comps—see me for details/help with that.

No screens out during class unless it is a research/work time. (Talk with me about exceptions.)

Reimagining Education
Allison Sterrett, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
209 : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:35-14:00

IEP - Language Arts M / 0.5

Let’s talk about what education SHOULD look like. How do schools set students up to succeed – or to fail – in society? Who benefits and who is left behind? What ideas are worth teaching and learning? What could we be doing differently?

In this Language Arts class, we will explore critical narratives of education and imagine and design the sort of schools we’d like to see.

Students will demonstrate competency through listening, reading, writing, and discussion. This class is open to students with IEP goals in reading and writing.

Studio Ghibli
Debbie Kuttner, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Room 220--Debbie's room : Tue/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

LA - 10B World LIT & COMP / 0.5

LIMITED to 27 students so PLEASE do NOT sign up if you are not going to regularly attend in the classroom. Students will not be taking this class as a pseudo-independent contract by watching movies on their own or outside of the classroom.

We will watch films from Studio Ghibli, like Princess Mononoke and Spirited Away. We will not be watching Nausicaa, Howl, or Totoro as those were viewed in 3rd quarter of Spring 2021 semester and students from that class that got messed up when we went hybrid can still take this class. Students of course can submit work based on any of those three movies. We will discuss, analyze, evaluate, and find joy in the films and then produce work reflective of our experiences intellectual and heartfelt. The four products from this class will include one project, one essay, and one creative writing, and one of your choice.

The Art of Writing
The Dark Knight Batman, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Room 102 : Tue/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

LA - 12B Comparative Lit & Comp / 0.5

NO CELL PHONES IN THIS CLASS. IF YOU CAN’T DEAL WITH THAT DON’T TAKE THIS CLASS.

And the great God, Shub la Pulesh, pronounced the written word. AND IT WAS GOOD!
Then the great God, Shub la Pulesh, pronounced that the written word could be poetry, short story, essay, letters to friends, comments, grocery lists, etc. And the list grew and grew of what the written word could be. AND IT WAS GOOD!
Then the great God, Shub la Pulesh, pronounced that a teacher must be born to offer a room where this could happen. So, out of the mud and the grime of this wheat thresher of a world was brought a man. TERRANCE, HE SHALL BE CALLED!!!!! the great God, Shub la Pulesh, cried. AND IT WAS BETTER THAN GOOD!!!
The great God, Shub la Pulesh, proclaimed that sometimes one would read what one had written out loud. AND THAT WOULD BE VERY GOOD INDEED!
And then and verily and finally the great God, Shub la Pulesh, pronounced, LET US TAKE ALL OF THESE WRITINGS AND COMPILE THEM INTO A PORTFOLIO AND THEN WHEN THE END COMES WE SHALL CULL OUT THE GREATEST OF THE GREAT AND MAKE THEM INTO A BOOK! YES! EACH OF YOU WILL MAKE A BOOK!!!!! AND THOSE BOOKS….THEY SHALL BE GOOOOOOOOD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
And the Earth shook from the magnitude of the great god, Shub la Pulesh’s, statement, but settled back down again so that students could come to Room 41 on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday to write and read the great words.

The Good Death
The Dark Knight Batman, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Room 102 : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:35-14:00

LA-H / 0.5

PLEASE READ THE TRIGGER WARNINGS BELOW. PLEASE DO NOT TAKE THIS CLASS IF YOU ARE SUICIDAL, HAVE INTENSE PROBLEMS WITH DISSOCIATION, DEPRESSION, OR OTHER MENTAL DISORDERS THAT COULD BE ADVERSELY AFFECTED BY TALKING ABOUT DEATH, CANNOT HAVE COMPASSION FOR OTHER HUMANS, CANNOT ALLOW OTHERS TO EITHER BE OR NOT BE RELIGIOUS OR SPIRITUAL OR ATHEISTIC OR AGNOSTIC, OR STRUGGLE TO PROVIDE PEOPLE SPACE TO EXPLORE WHAT THEY BELIEVE OR DON’T UNDERSTAND.

TRIGGER WARNINGS (Please read): Clearly, we will be talking about death. Death comes in many forms so we will be discussing those as well – suicide, violence, etc. We will be talking about different types of reality, meaning, and belief systems. We will explore the physical manifestation in the body of death and the burial/death rituals of many different cultures. This will involve in some cases visuals of the dead and perhaps blood or other viscera.

CELL PHONES WILL NOT BE ALLOWED IN THIS CLASS. IF YOU CAN’T DEAL WITH THAT DO NOT TAKE THE CLASS. YOU WILL BE MARKED ABSENT IF YOU TAKE IT OUT. AFTER TEN ABSENCES YOUR POSSIBLE CREDIT WILL BE CUT IN HALF. AT THAT POINT YOU WILL HAVE TO DO BOTH A CONTENT AND A COMMUNITY PROJECT TO MEET COMPETENCY FOR THE CLASS.

Okay, now for the description.

This class is important.

You live in a country that has a very overt fear of death. So much so that it is both trivialized, exploited, and not spoken of all at the same time.

So, I want to boldly start a conversation and an exploration into death.

We will explore what this fear has created in both this culture and you (if anything). You will deeply explore what you think/feel about death while you hear from your peers what they think and feel as well. You will research other cultures so you can get an idea of how these cultures treat death and the dead. We will hear from doctors about what actually happens to the body when it dies. I am trying to get an undertaker to come in and talk with you all about their job. We will also mediate in this class on death as well as life. We will look at poetry, stories, art, film, and so much more on the subject of death. We will examine grief as much as we examine love.

Your responsibility will be to try and be there while all this happens.
Your responsibility will be to work hard to discover what you believe.
You also have the responsibility to engage in the work of trying to discover what it means to you to have a good death and then take on the grail quest to deliver these revelations back to your classmates through a presented project.

You will write an essay, a short research paper, keep a journal, write reflections, learn about dreams and interpreting them, and do multiple projects throughout the course of this class.

We will read texts and look at how literature uses the dead, speaks of the dead, teaches us about dying.
We will watch films to see visuals of how death is taught, or not taught.

Your responsibility is to listen to your peers and do everything you can to learn from them and be compassionate.
Your ultimate responsibility is to become human and perhaps this is a good start.

Weird Fiction
The Dark Knight Batman, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Room 102 : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:30-11:55

LA - 12B Comparative Lit & Comp / 0.5

NO CELL PHONES WILL BE ALLOWED IN CLASS. YOU WILL BE COUNTED ABSENT IF YOU PULL YOURS OUT WITHOUT PERMISSION. IF YOU CAN’T DEAL WITH THIS THEN DO NOT TAKE THE CLASS.
WARNINGS: WE WILL LOOK AT ISSUES AND THEIR WILL BE MENTION OF SUCH THINGS AS DEATH, REALITY, HORROR, BLOOD, MONSTERS, HUMAN MONSTERS, NOTHINGNESS, THE VOID, MEANING.

ATTENDANCE: IF YOU MISS 10 OR MORE CLASSES YOUR POSSIBLE CREDIT WILL BE HALVED. IN ORDER TO GET THIS BACK, YOU WILL NEED TO COMPLETE BOTH A CONTENT AND COMMUNITY PROJECT.

Weird Fiction is a genre that incorporates aspects of horror, science fiction, fiction, fantasy, and various other genres. In general though, weird fiction is simply odd. It moves its readers to consider the meaning of their lives and the purpose of reality. It is also a genre that has waaaay more writers of color than all the genres I listed earlier in this paragraph.

In this class we will be watching a few films, reading the novella by Victor LaValle, “The Ballad of Black Tom”, and looking at a lot of short stories. Bella is going to take you through a way to use art and/or a super cool writing process to find and/or create meaning in the pieces that we look at.

You will learn how to write a short story, do short writing exercises, create projects, build a monster, question your reality, write an essay, discuss, and then discuss some more, and look at different philosophies attached to this genre.

If you took THE NEW AWAKE a few years ago, this class will have some overlap, but there will be some new stories.

Language Arts / Fine Arts

Free Queer Little Library
Julia Reade, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Nova Room 201

None assigned

Playwriting 2nd Semester
Brian Neel, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Dance Room : Tue/Thu 10:30-11:55

ART - Theatre Playwriting / 0.5; LA - Creative Writing / 0.5

Students in this class can receive either LA-Creative Writing credit or FA-Theatre 8/Playwriting credit.

This playwriting class will equip you with tools for creative self-expression, endowing self-confidence and the sense that ideas—about yourself, the world, and the challenges you face—matter. Your voice will be heard. All aspects of writing for the theater will be explored, including character, story, conflict, genre, driving action through dialogue, and the power of the unspoken word. There will be much improvisation and game-play. We will write quickly and fearlessly in an atmosphere of risk taking, with positive and constructive feedback.

Van Gogh with the Flow
Julia Reade, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Room 201 : Mon/Wed 12:35-14:00

IEP - Language Arts M / 0.5

Hector (Mondays only) and Julia are back with activities aimed at supporting student growth in communication and social skills as well as holding space where students feel safe stepping outside of their comfort zones. Mondays will be held in the art room, where we will explore communication and social skills through creative expression. Wednesdays will be held in Room 201, where we examine topics of interest and develop and explore our own personal wellness routines. We will examine our personal self-care routines with the goal of highlighting what is going well and growing in other areas. We also will examine relationships and practice what it means to heave healthy relationships with ourselves and others that center consent. Every other Friday we will explore and discuss visual media. Through Van Gogh with the Flow you will demonstrate Fine Arts, Health, and/or Language Arts learning objectives towards our school competencies.

Learning Objectives:

Health and Wellness:
1. Students will analyze the influence of family, peers, culture, media, technology, and other factors on health behavior
2. Students will demonstrate the ability to access valid information and products to enhance health
3. Students will demonstrate the ability to use interpersonal communication skills to enhance health and reduce health risks
4. Student will demonstrate the ability to use decision-making skills to enhance health
5. Students will demonstrate the ability to use goal-setting skills to enhance health
6. Students will demonstrate the ability to practice health-enhancing behaviors to avoid or reduce health risks
7. Students will demonstrate the ability to advocate for personal, family, and community healthy

Speaking and Listening:
1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners building on other’s ideas and expressing their own
2. Adapt speech to a variety of different contexts and task

What Would the Mushrooms Say?
Julia Reade, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Adam's (202) and/or Julia's (201) Room : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:35-14:00

None assigned

Please be aware that this class has a NO CELL PHONE policy. We will practice careful attention and use of all of our senses as we explore different ways to learn from the world around us. We hope you enjoy the 85 minute break from your devices! 😊

What would the mushrooms say about human’s relationship with the planet? Or, maybe they’ve been telling us all along and we haven’t been listening. This class will explore the possibilities that emerge when we center and listen to the voices of marginalized communities and the natural world. How do mycelium and indigiqueer speculative fiction reject environmental nihilism? How might you reimagine the Anthropocene? Through foundational activities, speculative writing, scientific inquiry, and mixed/multi media, we will engage with these voices as they critically respond to the dominant narratives about the dystopic outcomes of climate change.

Language Arts / Social Studies

Get it Done
Debbie Kuttner, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Rm 220 - Debbie's room : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:30-11:55

LA - 12B Comparative Lit & Comp / 0.5

Come get work done that you need for graduation. It could be your senior social justice inquiry project; finishing demonstrating competencies for missing credit in old classes; setting up indep contracts for bits of work or even entire semester’s worth of work.
This class is a guided independent course so expect to work with google docs and slack, so you and I can communicate during every class period (even if you are quarantined!) If any of you want help with how to get into college, write lengthy research papers, or just attempting a joy-infused senior year extravaganza, come to Room 220!

History of LGBTQIA+ Identities
Michelle Vecchio, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
204

None assigned

Origins and indigeneity: How did LGBTQ identities define themselves in pre-colonial indigenous cultures? What has been claimed? What is being reclaimed? What are the social and legal constructs of the identity?

Identity and agency: How do the historical ideas shape my identity? How do we develop identities within these constructs? How do constructs impact how others perceive you?

Power and Oppression: How do those in power attempt to erase identities within a culture?

Action and Reflection: How can individuals and their actions contribute to, but not be the lone agent, of change? How do we recognize our entanglement and solidarity within and across movements?

Resistance and Liberation: What is the role of creativity, love, joy and solidarity within liberation work?

Humanities Competency Support - MON
Melissa Park, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Melissa's room, 101 : Mon 2:50-4:00

LA / 0.5; SS - US History 11A / 0.5; SS - US History 11B / 0.5; UE - Focus / 0.25; WHist / 0.5

Attendance is required in this teacher-supported space to help you get humanities competency work/assignments completed for the current AND/OR previous semesters. Students will set a workable goal and communicate with Melissa AT EACH CLASS especially re: specific supports you need to move forward on competency completion, e.g.

*For independent LA/history study
*For completion of specific humanities course competencies

*Prepare for and verbally complete assigned work.
*Get help with breaking down assigned work into smaller manageable tasks.
*Get help with reading/making sense of assigned readings/texts.
*Get help with research strategies and/or doing research for assigned work.
*Get writing help on any type of assigned written work.
*Start/finish your Constitutional Issues CBA.
*Start/finish your inquiry history project or paper.
*Draft and revise that essay (or those poems, or reflections, etc.) that you still need to finish.
*Design a different plan to meet competencies that feels do-able—and interesting to you—with teacher support through the whole process.

Mathematics

...And a Side of Math... [Independent]
Lydia Wynn, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Zoom - https://seattleschools.zoom.us/j/83015320485?pwd=cEhpTjdydEtGMDhqSFJTR0YzeTRPdz09 : Mon 3:00-3:50

MA - Algebra 1A / 0.5; MA - Algebra 1B / 0.5; MA - Algebra 2A / 0.5; MA - Algebra 2B / 0.5; MA - Geometry A / 0.5; MA - Geometry B / 0.5

We will meet on Wednesdays as scheduled by the student.

For students who have not received full credit in a previous or required math class. We will explore what hasn’t worked for them in past math classes and create an alternate pathway to help student find their definition of success Students who haven’t found success in previous math classes should have been in high school for at least 2 years

This class will look like a few projects that students are working on in their natural lives and we work together to establish the mathematical connection and complete some work to demonstrate the mathematics competencies that may be missing from the student’s transcript.

The purpose for this class is to fulfill any math competencies that have not previously been met. This will be student driven and project based.

Algebra 1B Tue/Thu 10:30am
Lance Brown, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
room 221 : Tue/Thu 10:30-11:55

MA - Algebra 1B / 0.5

Your attendance and participation will be a factor in the assessment of your competency.

22 STUDENT MAXIMUM

This is the first semester of Algebra I. This course is appropriate for any students who are interested in taking it, regardless of whether they feel confident in math or not. In addition to learning the fundamentals of algebra, we’ll be devoting weekly class time to developing number sense, mathematical inquiry skills, and pattern recognition. Additional support time is available outside of class for students who would like additional help or more advanced challenges.

This class will cover 5 areas:

*COORDINATE PLANE

1 Coordinate plane review
2 Midpoint formula: find the midpoint
3 Midpoint formula: find the endpoint
4 Distance between two points

*PROPERTIES.
1 Properties of addition and multiplication
2 Distributive property
3 Simplify variable expressions using properties
4 Properties of equality
5 Identify equivalent equations

*VARIABLE EXPRESSIONS AND EQUATIONS

1 Write variable expressions
2 Sort factors of variable expressions
3 Simplify variable expressions involving like terms and the distributive property
4 Identify equivalent linear expressions
5 Write variable equations
6 Does x satisfy the equation?
7 Which x satisfies an equation?
report 8 Solve equations using order of operations
9 Does (x, y) satisfy the equation?
10 Relate the graph of an equation to its solutions
11 Rearrange multi-variable equations

*SOLVE EQUATIONS

1 Model and solve equations using algebra tiles
2 Write and solve equations that represent diagrams
3 Solve one-step linear equations
4 Solve two-step linear equations
5 Solve advanced linear equations
6 Solve equations with variables on both sides
7 Solve equations: complete the solution
8 Find the number of solutions
9 Create equations with no solutions or infinitely many solutions
10 Solve one-step and two-step equations: word problems
11 Solve linear equations: mixed review

*SINGLE-VARIABLE INEQUALITIES

1 Graph inequalities
2 Write inequalities from graphs
3 Identify solutions to inequalities
4 Solve one-step linear inequalities: addition and subtraction
5 Solve one-step linear inequalities: multiplication and division
6 Solve one-step linear inequalities
7 Graph solutions to one-step linear inequalities
8 Solve two-step linear inequalities
9 Graph solutions to two-step linear inequalities
10 Solve advanced linear inequalities
11 Graph solutions to advanced linear inequalities
12 Graph compound inequalities
13 Write compound inequalities from graphs
14 Solve compound inequalities
15 Graph solutions to compound inequalities
Checkpoint skill Checkpoint: Solve linear equations and inequalities

In addition to the mathematics content, students are expected to

  • listen with respect to another person’s explanation;
  • provide help when asked;
  • ask for help when needed;
  • play an active role in sustaining a safe and encouraging learning space for one another; and
  • treat all materials gently so that they may be reused.

Algebra 2B (MWF 10:30)
Akil Srinivasan, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
120 - Science Lab : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:30-11:55

MA - Algebra 2B / 0.5

This is the second of two semesters of Algebra 2. This course is appropriate for any students who are interested in taking it, and have taken Algebra 2A; it is the 3rd course in the math sequence at Nova. If you did NOT get full credit in Algebra 2A, still sign up for the B version AND:

  • Sign up for Competency Support on Wednesdays OR
  • Sign up for Math Skills with Akil/Sub

Note: There will be a long term substitute from Feb 14 to May 27 while Akil is on leave. Lydia and Akil will be supporting the sub with curriculum

In addition to reviewing the fundamentals of algebra, we’ll be learning about many new functions. The main focus will be how to use functions in real-life situations!

Our class will spend time on mathematical inquiry skills, mechanical skills, and how to apply these ideas to real life problems in engineering, science, and student-driven areas of interest.

There will be about 1 hour of homework/studying per week. Be prepared to practice your math skills and collaborate on projects.

This class will cover the following areas:

  • Finish Quadratic Functions
  • Exponential & Logarithmic Functions
  • Polynomials
  • Rational exponents & Radical functions (if time)
  • Rational Functions (if time)

In addition to the mathematics content, students are expected to

  • Listen with respect to another person’s explanation
  • Engage in discussion
  • Communicate ideas both informally and formally
  • Provide help when asked
  • Ask for help when needed;
  • Play an active role in sustaining a safe and encouraging learning space for one another
  • Treat all materials gently so that they may be reused.

Algebra 2B (TuThuF 12:35)
Akil Srinivasan, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
120 - Science Lab : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:35-14:00

MA - Algebra 2B / 0.5

This is the second of two semesters of Algebra 2. This course is appropriate for any students who are interested in taking it, and have taken Algebra 2A; it is the 3rd course in the math sequence at Nova. If you did NOT get full credit in Algebra 2A, still sign up for the B version AND:

  • Sign up for Competency Support on Wednesdays OR
  • Sign up for Math Skills with Akil/Sub

Note: There will be a long term substitute from Feb 14 to May 27 while Akil is on leave. Lydia and Akil will be supporting the sub with curriculum

In addition to reviewing the fundamentals of algebra, we’ll be learning about many new functions. The main focus will be how to use functions in real-life situations!

Our class will spend time on mathematical inquiry skills, mechanical skills, and how to apply these ideas to real life problems in engineering, science, and student-driven areas of interest.

There will be about 1 hour of homework/studying per week. Be prepared to practice your math skills and collaborate on projects.

This class will cover the following areas:

  • Finish Quadratic Functions
  • Exponential & Logarithmic Functions
  • Polynomials
  • Rational exponents & Radical functions (if time)
  • Rational Functions (if time)

In addition to the mathematics content, students are expected to

  • Listen with respect to another person’s explanation
  • Engage in discussion
  • Communicate ideas both informally and formally
  • Provide help when asked
  • Ask for help when needed;
  • Play an active role in sustaining a safe and encouraging learning space for one another
  • Treat all materials gently so that they may be reused.

Competency Completion WED 2:50pm
Lance Brown, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Rm 221 : Wed 2:50-4:00

MA - Algebra 1A / 0.5; MA - Algebra 1B / 0.5; MA - Geometry A / 0.5; MA - Geometry B / 0.5

Please specify the competency (credits) student needs

These spaces are subject specific – students who require missing competencies in one or more classes WITHIN ONE SUBJECT will meet ONCE A WEEK with a teacher – these are not drop in spaces, but regularly scheduled sessions to complete competencies specific to previously taken classes with missing competencies or to complete portfolios within the subject

While building content competencies, students will also develop their skills of:
Perseverance
Communication/Relationship
Modeling
Building Connections

Financial Algebra T/Th 12:35
Lance Brown, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Live online - scheduled meetings : Tue/Thu 12:35-14:00

MA - Financial Algebra 2 / 0.5

Your attendance and participation will be a factor in the assessment of your competency.

Max for Class 22

We will learn the everyday skills adults need to establish a budget, bank, save and borrow money, and pay local and national taxes. At the same time, we will be exploring the finances of the country. Just as we look at our own budgets, we will explore the topic of balancing the federal budget and learn about the issues that surround the federal deficit. As we explore the distinction between “wants” and “needs” in our own budgets, we will examine the choices our own country makes in its military spending. As we explore the way taxes are taken out of paychecks (FICA) we will look at the structure and sustainability of Social Security and Medicare. We will explore income tax models comparing fixed-amount taxation to flat/proportional taxes, to the progressive tax model. We will be using VR headsets for some of our work.

This is a math course for students who learn best by doing. It has been designed for those who “think with their hands” and who like to use math in real situations from the get go. We will do many labs and short term projects in this course. In addition to the math, we will be working throughout on problem solving skills, communication skills, and the ability to work on a team, the three attributes employers say are the most important to them.

Financial Algebra 1 is the first semester of a year-long course for students who have completed Algebra I and Geometry. This course can serve as the third credit of math for students who elect to take an alternative for the third year requirement through a counselor supported approval process. This course is also appropriate for students who have completed Algebra 2 and want to take a course specifically focusing on the mathematics of personal finance. The objectives of this course are not equivalent to the objectives for Algebra 2. Financial Algebra combines algebraic and graphical approaches with practical business and personal finance applications. Students explore algebraic thinking patterns and functions in a financial context. Students achieve success by offering an applications based learning approach incorporating Algebra 1, Algebra 2, and Geometry topics, and by connecting math to the real world. This course is designed to build upon prior knowledge of math concepts from other courses. This algebra-based course features real-world algebra concepts found in banking, credit, income taxes, insurance, and household budgeting. Step-by-step strategies will help students learn the time value of money, how to evaluate the purchases and consumer contracts, and how to build a business plan by knowing costs, profits, and break even points.

Geometry 1B Mon/Wed 10:30am
Lance Brown, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
room 221 : Mon/Wed 10:30-11:55

MA - Geometry B / 0.5

Your attendance and participation will be a factor in the assessment of your competency.

22 STUDENT MAXIMUM

Geometry B
Lydia Wynn, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
207 - Winnie's Room : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:35-14:00

MA - Geometry B / 0.5

Geometry Learning Objectives

The measurement of the world. (Geo – Earth, Metry – Measurement). In this class we will take the abstract ideas of mathematics and use them to make sense of the tangible world around us. Exploring measurement, properties of shapes, logic, and structure we will develop a strong sense of how mathematics builds up the world around us.

Experience in Algebra 1, is highly encouraged but we can work on building up those competencies as well. Please come to class with an open mind about where mathematics can take you in the world.

Integrated Math Mon/Wed 8:45am
Lance Brown, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Rm 221 : Mon/Wed 8:45-10:10

MA - Algebra 1B / 0.5; MA - Geometry B / 0.5

Please specify the competency (credits) student needs

Attendance and participation will contribute to assessment.

22 STUDENT MAXIMUM

Students can take this class if they need credit for ALGEBRA or GEOMETRY. Please specify which credit is needed, during sign up.

The focus of the course is to build on the students’ concrete reasoning experiences developed in
earlier grades. The course includes the following units of study: the real number system and its properties;
algebraic expressions, linear equations and inequalities; identifying and modeling functions, including
qualitative, linear, inequality, quadratic, exponential, absolute value, square and cubed root,and step
functions; systems of equations; translations of functions; identification of roots (zeros) and their significance;
arithmetic and geometric sequences; polynomials; factoring; quadratic equations; and the analysis of statistics
data. The use of calculators is an integral part of this course and graphing calculators (TI84+) is suggested.

Math
Reghan Biddle, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Room 122 : Tue/Thu 12:35-14:00

IEP - Basic Math 1A M / 0.5

Working on Math IEP Goals

Math in Society A (11th-12th only, intensive w/ MiS B)
Akil Srinivasan, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
207 - Lydia's Room : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:35-14:00

MA - Math Analysis A (EXP 2021) / 0.5; MA - Probability & Statistics A / 0.5

Important Requirements:

  • 11th/12th graders only
  • If you did not pass SBAC Math or meet the Math Grad Pathway, then this College-in-the-High-School (CIHS) class is for you.
    YOU MUST TAKE THIS CLASS WITH AKIL/SUB AND MATH IN SOCIETY B (TU/TH) WITH LYDIA! BOTH DAYS! This class is part of an intensive Math in Society to meet the Math Grad Pathway

Note: There will be a long term substitute from Feb 14 to May 27 while Akil is on leave. Lydia will be supporting the sub with curriculum

Math In Society will also be able to count as a Dual Enrollment if you choose. This means that you can receive college credit for completing this credit.

Math in Society Learning Objectives

A chance to take mathematics to a whole new level. We will be branching away from the typical “mathematics” courses and exploring topics of mathematics that are used in society today. For each topic we explore, the expectation is to work with all five competencies within each theme.

Enrollment for College in High School will begin in March.

Math in Society B
Lydia Wynn, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
207 - Winnie's Room : Tue/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

MA - Math in Society (CIHS) B / 0.5

Math In Society will also be able to count as a Dual Enrollment if you choose. This means that you can receive college credit for completing this credit.

Math in Society Learning Objectives

A chance to take mathematics to a whole new level. We will be branching away from the typical “mathematics” courses and exploring topics of mathematics that are used in society today. For each topic we explore, the expectation is to work with all five competencies within each theme.

Enrollment for College in High School will begin in March.

Math Skills (10th-11th only)
Akil Srinivasan, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Rm. 120 - Science Lab : Tue/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

MA - Algebra 1A / 0.5; MA - Algebra 1B / 0.5; MA - Algebra 2A / 0.5; MA - Algebra 2B / 0.5; MA - Geometry A / 0.5; MA - Geometry B / 0.5

Important Requirements:

  • 10th or 11th graders only
  • You like straight-up problem sets and worksheets, not bigger application projects.
  • You are open to checking your work and talking through your process with Akil and others

Note: There will be a long term substitute from Feb 14 to May 27 while Akil is on leave. Akil and Lydia will be supporting the sub with curriculum and ideas

Problem sets will practice math skills and also include contextualized word problems, more complex problems. Ideally a safe, supportive environment. Good prep for getting better at SBAC….

There will be small group discussion, since most students will be working on their own grouped skills plans in either Algebra 1, Geometry, or Algebra 2. We will be doing these problem sets mostly on paper, but we’ll use online tools like Desmos graphing calculator and Desmos-Geometry calculator for geometry skills.

This class can be taken along with the corresponding “B” course, like Geometry B that a student would also take.

Pre Calculus B
Lydia Wynn, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
207 - Winnie's Room : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:30-11:55

MA - PreCalc B (CIHS) / 0.5

Pre Calculus Learning Objectives

A chance to take mathematics to a whole new level. Using prior mathematics learning (Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2) as a foundation, we are going to explore how math can apply to your world with an introductory Calculus lens. From working with functions as a descriptor of relationships and change, to developing connections between triangles, circles, and functions (trigonometry). We will open our minds to the language that is used to describe the patterns of the world and strengthen your comfort towards working with mathematical notation, graphical representation, and manipulation.

Experience in Algebra 1, Geometry, and Algebra 2 is highly encouraged as they represent the foundation of what we do in Pre Calculus. Complete mastery is not necessary, however genuine effort and honest question asking are welcomed! Please come to class with an open mind about where mathematics can take you in the world.

Physical Education

3-Way Soccer
Stefan Gruber, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
start at the front stairs, then continue to The Dead Rat Field : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:30-11:55

PE - Individual/Dual Activity 1 / 0.5

3-Way soccer!
This is an unorthodox sports workshop. We sit down at the end of each game to talk about what rules we want to add and subtract to a constantly changing sport. 12 years of fine tuning in this way has produced a game that uses 3 teams on a circular field and a huge yoga ball that you dribble on the grass with your fist, or kick. It feels a bit like a bizarre circus act crossed with a blend of many familiar sports aspects. Meet at Stefan’s room to keep your bag safe, then we head over to the Dead Rat Field.

Map My Fun
Julia Reade, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Room 201 and Outside : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:30-11:55

PE - Individual/Dual Activity 1 / 0.5

IMPORTANT This semester Map My Fun is self-directed. This means we will meet at the beginning of each class, but then students will complete their daily activity independently. Map My Fun will utilize a fitness tracking app, Strava, and our own two feet. No phone? No problem! No feet? Also no problem. However, we will be outside mapping our fun rain or shine.

Did you know you can draw using the satellites in space? True story! We’ll use maps, technology, and our own two feet to create images. Walk a heart around King’s Deli, spell “Nova” on the Garfield grass field, or jog a dead rat as a tribute to your school. By mapping your phone, you will demonstrate physical fitness learning objectives towards our school competencies.

Learning Objectives:
1. Demonstration of motor skills and movement patterns
2. Application of concepts, principles, strategies, and tactics related to movement patterns and performance
3. Recognition of the value of physical activity for health, enjoyment, challenge, self-expression, and social interaction
4. Exhibition of responsible personal and social behavior that respects self and others
5. Demonstration of the knowledge and skills to achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of physical activity

Nova Sports Committee
Julia Reade, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Nova Room 201 : Tue/Thu 2:05-2:45

None assigned

This committee will focus on developing, planning and playing sports at Nova. Kira, the committee’s founding student, will lead ultimate frisbee, but we will play and plan other activities as well. Students are invited to attend Tuesday and/or Thursday.

Peace of Mind
Akil Srinivasan, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
205 - Stefan's Room : Fri 2:05-2:45

PE - Individual/Dual Activity 1 / 0.15

We will practice weekly formal mindfulness meditation. No experience necessary! Many studies show that daily meditation can help us deal with a host of mental health issues such as anxiety and depression and help with stress reduction as well!

PE credit also available

Science

Adv Chemistry Projects
Eyva Winet, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
RM #120 : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:35-14:00

SC - Chemistry B / 0.5

This class is for students with some chemistry background which could include some self study of chemistry because of having a high interest in the subject. See Eyva to ask more questions about if this is the class for you.

This course is an experiential journey through the essential themes, concepts, models, laboratory skills, mathematics and thinking processes that characterize a molecular understanding of the world. This class emphasizes creating a context for chemistry by understanding the history, philosophy, multi-ethnic perspectives, ethics, applications and relevance of chemistry. Chemistry is a study of the atomic theory, the structure of matter, bonding, nuclear chemistry, fuel chemistry, the periodic table, stoichiometry, reaction chemistry, equilibrium, kinetics, oxidation-reduction chemistry and more. These reactions and concepts explain and control the environment, product manufacturing, the human body, scientific arts like photography and ceramics, food, fermentation and combustion! Expect labs, color changes, burning stuff, and fun! We will also discuss pressing chemical issues and chemical ethics. There is math and writing in this course so get ready to use your whole brain!

Gaia Science (Sci/WA)
Adam Croft, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
room 202 : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

SC - Earth Science (EXP-2021) / 0.5

How does the Earth live as an interconnected set of relations between living and non-living beings? How can such an understanding help us confront the global and local challenges we face today? These and related questions will guide our whole-class inquiry while each students takes on their own inquiry into the workings of our living Earth, sometimes known as Gaia.

Life on Earth
Susan Barth, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Susan's Room B03 : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:30-11:55

SC - Biology B / 0.5

Life on Earth

Students will explore the science and history of life on Earth. Students will be expected to develop a broad understanding of the dynamics of life on Earth while also taking on an inquiry and teaching project exploring a particular aspect of Earth’s life. This course is a companion course with Biology, but they don’t need to be taken consecutively.

Competencies
Students will meet competency in Life on Earth by demonstrating that they can successfully:
- ask relevant questions and evaluate the connections between different questions in issues pertaining to the course’s areas of focus;
- gain knowledge and communicate understanding of biology, including definitions of and requirements for life, biological evolution, ecological systems, and understanding the relations of biotic and abiotic factors;
- design, carry-out, assess, and communicate field and/or laboratory experiments;
- practice sustained observation of an organism and/or habitat, including intentional use of imagination in support of perception;
- design, carry-out, and communicate (in writing, orally, graphically, and other media) research, including scientific, historical, and civic;
- take action at different scales of influence, including self, home, neighborhood, city, and beyond;
- communicate effectively, including through teaching peers, leading short courses and workshops, educating the public, organizing the community, writing, public speaking, the arts, and other media;
- reflect upon learning and actions through different media, including writing, visual arts, music, theater, etc.

Scope and sequence:
I. What is life? How do we answer such a question? [research, classify, design]
a. Zones of exploration
i. Definition of life;
ii. Requirements for life;
iii. Classification of life.
b. Project: Design a viable creature.
II. How do organisms live together? How do we study these interactions? [research, observe, design, experiment]
a. Zones of exploration
i. Ecological relations
ii. Human-induced changes.
b. Project: Design and conduct a field study.
III. How do organisms change over time? How do we know? [research, scheme]
a. Zones of exploration
i. Evolution by natural selection;
ii. Examples of evolution;
iii. Human evolution.
b. Project: Plausible evolution of creature.
IV. Biology EOC: practice and review
V. Final reflection:
a. What have you accomplished?
b. What have you learned?
c. What are you still pondering?
d. What are you still struggling over?
e. What will you take with you from this experience?

Marine Ecology
Susan Barth, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Room B3 : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:30-11:55

SC - Marine Science 1 / 0.5

We will focus on marine life and the environments they live in. We will be learning about specific organisms and how they work, gather food, evolve, survive harsh conditions, and the types of symbiotic relationships they form. There will be an anatomy and physiology portion in each ecosystem we learn about. We may dissect some organisms (not mandatory). We will use Inquiry to discover things about marine life and the ocean, create explorations and put our learning to use. We will explore how scientists create studies to investigate the marine environment.

Conservation will be a focus in this class, looking at what is happening in our oceans and figuring out what we can do about it. We will look at water and it’s life from a social justice stance, how are people and organisms affected by the greed of others? You will be expected to participate in conservation actions this semester (Service Learning hours will be available).

This class will be a .5 Marine Science credit.

Seminar

Freshfolks through the lens of LGBTIAQ+ Texts and Stories
Brent Hester, 1st SEM-FALL 2021-22
#204 : Tue/Thu 8:45-10:10

LA - 9A Intro to LIT & COMP / 0.5

Freshfolks is an introduction to Nova, an LA class, an opportunity to practice: Nova norms, self advocacy, alternative forms of assessment, choice and consent in what and how you are learning and social justice and action. This version of fresh folks has be designed and co-facilitated by staff and students of multiple genders and orientations who came together with past knowledge and experience studying, exploring, learning and/or teaching about LGBTQIA+ culture and history. We are part of a process that is piloting curriculum that will be used by the whole district. Students in this class will get to explore intersectional stories and move through a cycle of exploring identity, power and privilege, resistance and action while engaging with many kinds of texts and stories that speak to these themes.

Social Studies

Abolition Studies (AGE/WH)
Adam Croft, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
room 202 : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:30-11:55

SS - American Government & Economics / 0.5

Note: This course is primarily intended for students seeking American Government & Economics (AGE) credit, but can also be a vehicle for practicing and demonstrating World History (WH) competencies for WH credit.

What is abolition and how can we abolish those systems and institutions that cause harm? What types of systems and institutions do we need to create to heal and promote well-being? These and related questions will initiate our whole-class inquiry while each student takes on their own inquiry process into the workings (and not workings) of civic and other institutions of power, including exploring and developing your own relation to public and private power.

This course will focus upon developing skills in research, writing, discussion, and civic action. Students seeking World History credit will emphasize development of the practices of historical inquiry, including posing authentic inquiry questions, analyzing dominant and critical narratives, identifying and accessing relevant sources of information, and synthesizing research into historical understanding through writing and discussion. Students seeking American Government & Economics (AGE) credit will practice these same skills of historical inquiry while developing skills for critical participation in democratic governance and other tools for accessing/confronting systems and structures of power.

This is a project-based course in which students will develop inquiry projects based upon their own particular questions and interests. We will also regularly engage in whole-class activities, including readings, discussions, films, guest speakers, and activities suggested and/or led by students.

This course will enroll a maximum of 25 students.

Applied History (WH/Sci/WA)
Adam Croft, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
room 202 : Tue/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

SS - World History 3 / 0.5

What future would you like to help create? How can historical and scientific understanding help us to make sense of the present so as to create a just and humane future? In a time of profound and over-lapping challenges to individuals, communities, nations, and the world at large, students in this course will develop and practice skills of historical and scientific inquiry to develop possibilities and pathways for the futures they would like to bring into being.

This course will focus upon developing skills in research, writing, discussion, and scientific inquiry. Students seeking World History credit will emphasize development of the practices of historical inquiry, including posing authentic inquiry questions, analyzing dominant and critical narratives, identifying and accessing relevant sources of information, and synthesizing research into historical understanding through writing and discussion. Students seeking Science credit will emphasize development of the practices of scientific inquiry, including skills in research, observation, experimentation, and communication. Students seeking WA State History credit will emphasize local topics within their historical and scientific inquiry.

This is a project-based course in which students will develop inquiry projects based upon their own particular questions and interests. We will also regularly engage in whole-class activities, including readings, discussions, films, guest speakers, and activities suggested and/or led by students.

This course will enroll a maximum of 25 students.

World History Competencies

Students will engage in sustained student-centered and -driven inquiry, which will demonstrate their ability to:

Practice historical scholarship:
- pose meaningful questions, gain knowledge, and communicate understanding of historical inquiry, including racism, historical inequity, relevant policies, collective and individual actions to address injustice;
- critically analyze texts and people for their use of dominant narrative and implicit bias;
- research complex topics and articulate arguments that take into account multiple divergent points of view;
- find and evaluate primary and secondary resources for bias;
- engage in the writing process, including planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

Transform understanding into action in the world:
- identify, problem-solve, and take action toward a social justice challenge.

Participate in community scholarship and action:
- communicate effectively to a group of peers and elders their inquiry process, content, and creative outcome.

Science Competencies

Students will engage in sustained student-centered and -driven inquiry, which will demonstrate their ability to:

Practice scientific scholarship:
- pose meaningful questions, gain knowledge, and communicate understanding of natural and physical systems;
- design, carry-out, and communicate (in writing, orally, graphically, and other media) research, including scientific, historical, and civic.

Develop scientific practice:
- practice sustained observation of natural and physical systems, including intentional use of imagination in support of perception;
- design, carry-out, assess, and communicate field and/or laboratory experiments;
- model natural and physical systems and communicate understanding of both model and real-world systems.

Participate in community scholarship and action:
- communicate effectively to a group of peers and elders their inquiry process, content, and creative outcome.

Coral Reef Crochet (WH, Art, Sci, CTE)
Melissa Park, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Melissa's room, 101 : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:35-14:00

ART - Multimedia 1 (EXP 2021) / 0.5; CTE - Apparel & Textiles I / 0.5; SC - Science Seminar (EXP 2021) / 0.5; WHist / 0.5

Yes, this is a class where you can learn how to and/or practice crochet to create various projects, and also work towards specifically practicing and demonstrating world history, or art, or science, or CTE competencies. (Materials will be provided.) The class will be organized around interdisciplinary inquiry research, study, writing, seminars, and (individual and collective) experiments with yarn and handcrafting. All students are asked to contribute a crocheted creation to a group-constructed crocheted coral reef at Nova. That project aims to facilitate our learning and teaching about some of the most diverse ecosystems in the world, recreating with yarn nature’s very old hyperbolic surfaces/geometry (e.g. corals, kelps, sea creatures), symbiotic relationships among life forms, and human relations to / impacts on places.

Because so much of our competencies learning and practice takes place during in-person classes and through assignments grounded in activities from classes, a student missing more than 9 classes will need to complete makeup work for missed content and/or community scholarship comps—see me for details/help with that.

No screens out during class unless it is a research/work time. (Talk with me about exceptions.)

Just Us (US 11B/WH, ES)
Melissa Park, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Melissa's room, 101 : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:35-14:00

SS - Ethnic Studies US11B / 0.5; SS - Ethnic Studies WH-2 / 0.5

This course can count as 0.5 ES World or 0.5 ES US History. All students are eligible to earn honors credit; see Melissa and/or Schoology for details. Content-warnings for [brief mentions/short narratives, statistics re:] violence, death, drug use, mental illness, incarceration, poverty, intergenerational trauma, PTSD, stigmas against formerly/currently incarcerated peoples.

“Just Us” is an ethnic studies class that seeks to complicate our notions of justice through inquiries and analysis of problems and interpretations of the prison industrial complex (PIC). This class grows out of a collaboration with members of the Black Prisoners Caucus (BPC) originating at Monroe Correctional Complex. BPC organizes a variety of programs for prisoners around education, mental health and other prison issues. They also work with outside organizations on social justice issues.

We will unpack the origins of dominant narratives of prison, crime, and punishment in the US and world. If, as Robert A. Ferguson says, “how a country punishes is part of its very meaning,” and “how we punish says how we think of ourselves generally,” what does it mean that the US has the highest incarceration rate in the world? That every single U.S. state incarcerates more people per capita than virtually any independent democracy on Earth?

How can we learn the human impacts, people’s lived experiences of systems that contribute to incarceration? How are people, even in the midst of these systems of oppression, “still calling ourselves sacred?” How can healing help us transform the impacts of oppression on individual, communal, and systemic levels? What are the myriad historical and present day stories of how communities are doing healing work and “dismantling and tearing down, but also building up and creating new institutions” to transform harm? What makes communities safe? What are our own entanglements with systems that help maintain or disrupt the PIC? What are our individual and collective obligations to ourselves and our communities to reflect and act on what we learn?

Expect to take on your own inquiry project (and teach/share it), that is related to/could facilitate transforming your critical historical understandings into action in the world / your life.

Because so much of our competencies learning and practice takes place during in-person classes and through assignments grounded in activities from classes, a student missing more than 9 classes will need to complete makeup work for missed content and/or community scholarship comps—see me for details/help with that.

No screens out during class unless it is a research/work time. (Talk with me about exceptions.)

Sweetness & Power (WH, ES)
Melissa Park, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Melissa's room, 101 : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:30-11:55

SS - Ethnic Studies WH-2 / 0.5

For more than 2,000 years humans have been extracting sugar or sucrose from plants and honey which changed human diets, food culture, and social habits. The history of sugar in the world includes myriad stories of how sweetness and power have and continue to shape our present. As appetites for sweetness in human diets rose, so did lucrative and brutal processes of colonization, enslavement, revolution, and industrialization in a growing global market. This ethnic studies world history class will interrogate colonial structures tied to sugar that marginalize the histories and experiences of enslaved peoples and their descendants in the African and Afro-Latinx diasporas, as well as Asian indentured sugar workers.

At the same time, we’ll also study the music and dance of sugar work, as author Marina Budhos wrote, “…Africans did not simply work, fight, flee, or die. They also made music and invented dances that were the very pulse of life. Music was woven into ceremonies, bringing African beliefs, beats, and worship across the ocean. Music mourned and defied, celebrated and uplifted. Every land where the Africans worked, where the cane grew, has its own form of beat, its own rhythms, its own songs and dances that can be traced back to sugar – and even to sources in Africa. And that was only the first step in the sugar-music-story.”

Expect to take on your own inquiry project on sugar (and teach/share it) from one or more lenses, e.g. culinary, ecological, historical, health/wellness, labor, business/industry, sugar and the brain, sugar and the body, music, dance, visual art — that have to do with transforming your understandings into action in the world / your life.

Because so much of our competencies learning and practice takes place during in-person classes and through assignments grounded in activities from classes, a student missing more than 9 classes will need to complete makeup work for missed content and/or community scholarship comps—see me for details/help with that.

No screens out during class unless it is a research/work time. (Talk with me about exceptions.)

This Place (US 11A/WH, ES)
Melissa Park, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
Melissa's room, 101 : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

SS - Ethnic Studies US11A / 0.5; SS - Ethnic Studies WH-2 / 0.5

This course can count as 0.5 ES World or 0.5 ES US History. All students are eligible to earn honors credit; see Melissa and/or Schoology for details.

We will explore the history of this place (e.g., Nova, the CD, the Seattle area, Washington, the west, etc.) in local, national, and international contexts. How has Seattle been tied to major events and historical processes in US history, and world history? How can we complicate our notions and practices of studying “US history” as all of it continues to take place on Native peoples’ lands?

The class goals include developing a broad understanding of the dynamics of life in “this place,” getting to know the bioregion, developing awareness of being part of it, and all of the relationships it facilitates in our lives. Indigenous knowledge and practices re: stewardship of community and place will guide how we approach co-creating our class community and learning from each other.

Expect to take on your own placefulness inquiry project (and teach/share it), that is related to/could facilitate transforming your critical historical understandings into action in the world / your life. To paraphrase artist/educator Jenny Odell, “placefulness” includes working with questions that yield sensitivity and responsibility to the historical (what happened here) and the ecological (who and what lives, or lived, here).”

Because so much of our competencies learning and practice takes place during in-person classes and through assignments grounded in activities from classes, a student missing more than 9 classes will need to complete makeup work for missed content and/or community scholarship comps—see me for details/help with that.

No screens out during class unless it is a research/work time. (Talk with me about exceptions.)

World Languages

ASL (American Sign Language) 10:30
Brent Hester, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
RM #204 : Mon/Wed 10:30-11:55

WL - ASL 1A / 0.5; WL - ASL 1B / 0.5

Participants will explore different aspects of Deaf culture and learn American Sign Language. The students will learn linguistic patterns and apply them in various situations. The instruction is both in American Sign Language and written English (projected typed lecture and discussion). Teaching strategies are heavily focused on an immersion model. Voicing (speaking using one’s voice) is not permitted in the ASL classroom.
New signs are taught and practiced daily, and fingerspelling is emphasized and practiced daily to support fluency.
The content of the class will be Deaf culture and learning American Sign Language. In class students will be introduced to different aspects of Deaf Culture, including:
• Deaf LGBTQ+ communities
• Deaf music/arts/literature/media
• Accessibility
• Hearing allies
Deaf Technology
• Audism/Linguicism/Phonocentrism
• Deaf cultural history
• Deaf BIPOC topics
• Careers using American Sign Language
Students joining class second semester will need to learn and be able to use the ASL alphabet within the first week of class. We will continue practicing in class for fluency.
Current class capacity is a maximum of 22 students.

*This class will be Co-Facilitated by Michael Cooper.

ASL (American Sign Language) 8:45
Brent Hester, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
RM #204 : Mon/Wed 8:45-10:10

WL - ASL 1A / 0.5; WL - ASL 1B / 0.5

Participants will explore different aspects of Deaf culture and learn American Sign Language. The students will learn linguistic patterns and apply them in various situations. The instruction is both in American Sign Language and written English (projected typed lecture and discussion). Teaching strategies are heavily focused on an immersion model. Voicing (speaking using one’s voice) is not permitted in the ASL classroom.
New signs are taught and practiced daily, and fingerspelling is emphasized and practiced daily to support fluency.
The content of the class will be Deaf culture and learning American Sign Language. In class students will be introduced to different aspects of Deaf Culture, including:
• Deaf LGBTQ+ communities
• Deaf music/arts/literature/media
• Accessibility
• Hearing allies
Deaf Technology
• Audism/Linguicism/Phonocentrism
• Deaf cultural history
• Deaf BIPOC topics
• Careers using American Sign Language
Students joining class second semester will need to learn and be able to use the ASL alphabet within the first week of class. We will continue practicing in class for fluency.
Current class capacity is a maximum of 22 students.

*This class will be Co-Facilitated by Michael Cooper.

Spanish M/W
Brent Hester, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
RM #204 : Mon/Wed 12:35-14:00

WL - Spanish 1A / 0.5; WL - Spanish 1B / 0.5; WL - Spanish 2A / 0.5; WL - Spanish 2B / 0.5

Participants will explore different aspects of Spanish/Latin American culture, learn vocabulary and linguistic patterns, and apply them in various situations. The instruction is in Spanish with occasional “English islands”. Teaching strategies are heavily focused on an immersion model. Students must be willing to engage with content and participate in class activities. Students will be expected to practice speaking and writing Spanish in class at their target level on a daily basis.

Much of the content of this class will relate to culture, which is the vehicle from which students will learn and practice language. Themes to be reviewed and introduced this semester will include:
• Introductions
• Describing self and others
• Stating likes and dislikes
• School
• Food
• Clothing
• Hobbies
• Music
• Travel

This class is designed for first and second year Spanish students. Students seeking 3rd year Spanish credits should check in with the instructor prior to registration.

Current class capacity is a maximum of 22 students.

Spanish T/Th
Brent Hester, 2nd SEM-SPRING 2021-22
RM #204 : Tue/Thu 8:45-10:10

WL - Spanish 1A / 0.5; WL - Spanish 1B / 0.5; WL - Spanish 2A / 0.5; WL - Spanish 2B / 0.5

Participants will explore different aspects of Spanish/Latin American culture, learn vocabulary and linguistic patterns, and apply them in various situations. The instruction is in Spanish with occasional “English islands”. Teaching strategies are heavily focused on an immersion model. Students must be willing to engage with content and participate in class activities. Students will be expected to practice speaking and writing Spanish in class at their target level on a daily basis.

Much of the content of this class will relate to culture, which is the vehicle from which students will learn and practice language. Themes to be reviewed and introduced this semester will include:
• Introductions
• Describing self and others
• Stating likes and dislikes
• School
• Food
• Clothing
• Hobbies
• Music
• Travel

This class is designed for first and second year Spanish students. Students seeking 3rd year Spanish credits should check in with the instructor prior to registration.

Current class capacity is a maximum of 22 students.