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Found 12 courses.

Language Arts

A-Lit
Debbie Kuttner, 1st Semester 2019-20
Rm 220 - Debbie's room : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

LA - 12A Comparative Lit & Comp / 0.5; LA - 12B Comparative Lit & Comp / 0.5

Take your passion(s) and make one huge semester-long inquiry project that is all about: Social Justice, Educating Others, Research, Writing, and Presenting. We will build a community together where everyone in the room will be getting credit for their service learning, senior project and presentation, and senior research paper (and maybe more!). Wow! The “a” in A-Lit secretly stands for Adam, because it was Adam who suggested that 2018-2019 be a pilot year for trying to roll up all the senior requirements into one HUGE social justice inquiry project. PIlot year is over. This is the real deal! (Please note: if you are looking for a slighly different senior class, come talk to me and maybe we can make this class be your … how to get into college, write a 12-15 page research paper, finish your credits for graduation, or all-around joy-infused senior year extravaganza!)

Blog on Novaknows.com
Debbie Kuttner, 1st Semester 2019-20
Debbie's Room 220 : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:20-13:45

LA - Journalism Writing / 0.5

There is an art to writing for yourself. Some call it narrative essay, some call it blogging, or journalling or sometimes it’s just about getting your ideas out there onto the interwebs and sharing your thoughts about music, movies, books, video games, politics, art, etc. In this class students will learn how to communicate ideas to an audience. There will be opportunities for writing reviews, interviews, research, and narratives. Some students will step up to be peer editors, some to work on the technical side (wordpress is our platform); some students will choose to write weekly columns, or to be investigative reporters. We will make decisions as a community of learners, perhaps tying ourselves directly with committees or other Nova/community entities (like facilitating a space for the PTSA, coor groups, Douglas Truth library, and more).

Check out novaknows.com and come and make it more of what it is, or something completely different.

Freshfolks
The Dark Knight Batman, 1st Semester 2019-20
102 : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

LA - 9A Intro to LIT & COMP / 0.5

This class can only being considered for LA 9A.

WARNING: THERE WILL BE NO CELL PHONES ALLOWED IN THIS CLASS. IF YOU CAN’T DEAL WITH THAT IT IS GOING TO BE A LONG SEMESTER. IF YOU TAKE A CELL PHONE DURING CLASS WITHOUT PRIOR PERMISSION FROM YOUR COORDINATOR YOU WILL BE MARKED AS ABSENT FOR THE DAY. AT YOUR 7TH ABSENCE YOU WILL LOSE HALF OF YOUR CREDIT.

This Freshfolks class is designed to orient and introduce you to how Nova works and what language arts classes are like here. As the course title suggest, we hope to move from inquiry (how to pose inquiry and to take ownership over your learning) to understanding (understanding Nova norms and inquiry-based approach to teaching and learning). During the class you will read stories, a novel, watch films and documentaries, and practice your philosophical, writing, and communication skills. You will write an essay, a research paper, and at least one piece of creative writing (a story or poem). You will also do a book project (not report).
Additionally, as you experiment with writing in different genres, you will learn something about analyzing a text (i.e., a story, poem, film, or image) and how to give an account of how something means what it does (or what you think it does). Students in this course will be encouraged to read and reflect on their own ideas and experiences and then examine these ideas in relation to the films and other texts we read and analyze together.

Our goal for the semester will be to read, write, think, and discuss things that matter most to us. In other words, we want to find things we care about and then talk and write about them together. We will strive to develop an inquiry community where we can respectfully share, discuss, and critique our ideas and the ideas of others. We will push each other to think carefully about our beliefs and assumptions about the world as well as how we’ve come to understand the world and ourselves in particular ways. With an eye toward these ends, students will engage in daily, meaningful reading, writing, speaking, and listening tasks in English class and at home.

Me Vs. You
Chelsey Richardson, 1st Semester 2019-20
Melissa's Room - Moon 101 : Mon/Wed/Fri 14:35-16:00

LA / 0.5

“Me Verses You”, will be an exploration of R&B music, poetry, and literature from the 80’s, and 90’s. We will examine the ways in which these artistic mediums depict and perpetuate ideas about gender, race and class. Students will take what they’ve learned and engage in research from the perspective of their generation’s artistic expression of R&B music, poetry, and literature. We will think critically about what we read and listen to and investigate the ways in which language and guide society. Students will engage in learning in a variety of ways. We will read, write, watch music videos, and movies.

This class is taught by Chelsey!

Playwriting
Susan Watters, 1st Semester 2019-20
Dance Room : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:15-11:40

LA - Creative Writing / 0.5

Young Playwrights Program (YPP) sponsored by ACT Theatre. Facilitator: K. Brian Neel

This playwriting class will equip you with tools for creative self-expression, endowing self-confidence and the sense that ideas—about yourself, the world, and the challenges you face—matter. Your voice will be heard. All aspects of writing for the theater will be explored, including character, story, conflict, genre, driving action through dialogue, and the power of the unspoken word. There will be much improvisation and game-play. We will write quickly and fearlessly in an atmosphere of risk taking, with positive and constructive feedback.

Students in this class can receive either LA-Creative Writing credit or FA-Theatre 8/Playwriting credit.

Poetry
Melissa Park, 1st Semester 2019-20
Melissa's room, Moon 101 : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:20-13:45

LA - Poetry / 0.5

This is a class about the power of language to heal, to incite, to inform, to describe, to express feelings. It has two main goals: to practice/learn how to read poetry for meaning and purpose, and to write your own poems. Writing, after all, is a form of thinking—about your life, about your world. Imagine what’s possible when one develops a regular (even daily) practice of writing, for yourself. To get good at it also requires that you read—A LOT. This builds your “ear for language” muscles, your growing breadth of human experiences as expressed in others’ stories/words, and growing your awareness of/engagement with all kinds of experimental, beautiful, wacko, rhyming, narrative, heartfelt, and powerhouse literature out there waiting to be read—and a reminder that you can always be part of that world too.

Earning full credit includes turning in a portfolio of 16 original poems written this semester AND a portfolio of 20 analyses of other people’s poems (you will have lots of time in class to do these). This semester I am changing the format of how students can share their analyses/interpretations of poems—and will post details here ASAP. Students will still be required to lead one seminar in front of the class that lasts 15-20 minutes.

Expect to read and discuss A LOT of poems to explore a range of how poets in different places and eras have used language to describe the “unsayable” in their lives. Expect to really use your ears and listening skills to develop a feel for the music, tone, and rhythm in others’ poetry and our own. Expect to sit with big questions most all humans face. Expect to work on strategies to push through frustrations with writing. We’ll do writing games, exercises from prompts, and experiment with various poetic forms. Taking this class means you’re expected to actively participate in building and sustaining a writing community—one that cultivates sincerity, respect for others, mindfulness, and really listening.

We may do ‘poetry field trips’ to read and write outdoors and/or in different settings, and co-create a group poetry project that could look like hosting an open mic or poetry reading at or away from school, or a class poetry ’zine or cd, or something else entirely. Look forward to awesome guest poets and workshops. Students are also encouraged to participate in Youth Speaks Seattle writing circles, open mics, and local slams.

PLEASE REMEMBER, NO CELL PHONES ARE ALLOWED IN THE CLASS. SERIOUSLY. DO NOT SIGN UP FOR THIS CLASS IF YOU CAN’T HANDLE THIS. (You will be marked absent if your phone is out during class.)

ATTENDANCE: For 0.5 credit, students can miss up to six classes (excused or unexcused) until they need to complete projects to make up for missed community competencies. Students will have multiple options to demonstrate they’ve met these missed competencies.

Queer Eye for Film
The Dark Knight Batman, 1st Semester 2019-20
Rm 102 : Mon/Wed 10:15-11:40

LA / 0.5

CELL PHONES WILL NOT BE ALLOWED IN THIS CLASS. IF YOU CAN’T DEAL WITH THAT DO NOT TAKE THE CLASS. YOU WILL BE MARKED ABSENT IF YOU TAKE IT OUT. AFTER SEVEN ABSENCES YOUR POSSIBLE CREDIT WILL BE CUT IN HALF.

This class will be examining queer films. We will examine these films through the lens of gender identity and sexuality. We will also look at film making in general, film tropes, representation and its aspects in conjunction with a capitalist society, symbolism and theme in films, and how all of this is relevant to you. You will do a project on each film that is reflective in nature. You will examine your own history and education regarding gender identity and sexuality as well as understand and contemplate the concept of gender fluidity and the deconstruction of a gender binary. We will also be looking at intersectional issues regarding gender and race.

Possible films we may watch are:
The Celluloid Closet
Moonlight
Paris is Burning
Rafiki
But I’m a Cheerleader
TransAmercia
Bird Cage
and many more.

Work for this class will have to be done outside of the class since we will devote as much time as possible to watching and discussing the films.

Series of Fortunate Events
Julia Reade, 1st Semester 2019-20
Various

LA / 0.25; LA / 0.25

As the name states, this is a series of intensives. Students could take the entire series or a single intensive, using the remainder of the time as a structured study hall. Each intensive will be for .25 credit. Perfect for those students missing a tad of credit here and there.

The first class in the series will be taught by Julia and Jared. The theme is games! Students will play and bring to life their favorite sedentary games.

Dates: 9/11-10/25
Days: M,W, Every Friday

Description: We will be bringing our favorite sedentary games to life! By reimagining their games such as D&D, chess, Magic, Plants vs Zombies, students will have the opportunity to demonstrate competency in PE and/or Language Arts towards a total of .25 credit. Students may also work with Jared, Julia, and a math teacher to identify and demonstrate missing math competencies in a way similar to the opportunities Mike provided in Infernal Casino. Opportunities to demonstrate other academic competencies towards missing credit may be available upon request

The Art of Fiction
Debbie Kuttner, 1st Semester 2019-20
Rm 220 - Debbie's Room : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

LA - 11B Amer LIT & COMP / 0.5

Let’s read books! Wait, what is a book in the 21st century? Let’s look at a variety of genres (science fiction, fantasy, sci fi, dystopias, horror, alternate history, historical fiction, magical realism, and more). And while we are at it, let’s make our own multimedia books—using found materials. Let’s build something we can all be proud of.
Students will be expected to read, sometimes with ears, sometimes with eyes, and sometimes with both. Students will be expected to write, sometimes with mouth, and sometimes with fingers—using a variety of implements.

The Good Death
The Dark Knight Batman, 1st Semester 2019-20
Room 102 : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

LA-H / 0.5

YOU WILL HAVE TO GET A PERMISSION SLIP SIGNED BY YOU AND YOUR PARENT/GUARDIAN TO SIGN-UP FOR THIS CLASS. YOU CAN OBTAIN THIS FROM TERRANCE. AGAIN, I WILL NOT ALLOW YOU TO SIGN-UP FOR THIS CLASS WITHOUT A COMPLETED PERMISSION SLIP.

PLEASE READ THE TRIGGER WARNINGS BELOW. PLEASE DO NOT TAKE THIS CLASS IF YOU ARE SUICIDAL, HAVE INTENSE PROBLEMS WITH DISSOCIATION, DEPRESSION, OR OTHER MENTAL DISORDERS THAT COULD BE ADVERSELY AFFECTED BY TALKING ABOUT DEATH, CANNOT HAVE COMPASSION FOR OTHER HUMANS, CANNOT ALLOW OTHERS TO EITHER BE OR NOT BE RELIGIOUS OR SPIRITUAL OR ATHEISTIC OR AGNOSTIC, OR STRUGGLE TO PROVIDE PEOPLE SPACE TO EXPLORE WHAT THEY BELIEVE OR DON’T UNDERSTAND.

TRIGGER WARNINGS (Please read): Clearly, we will be talking about death. Death comes in many forms so we will be discussing those as well – suicide, violence, etc. We will be talking about different types of reality, meaning, and belief systems. We will explore the physical manifestation in the body of death and the burial/death rituals of many different cultures. This will involve in some cases visuals of the dead and perhaps blood or other viscera.

CELL PHONES WILL NOT BE ALLOWED IN THIS CLASS. IF YOU CAN’T DEAL WITH THAT DO NOT TAKE THE CLASS. YOU WILL BE MARKED ABSENT IF YOU TAKE IT OUT. AFTER SEVEN ABSENCES YOUR POSSIBLE CREDIT WILL BE CUT IN HALF.

Okay, now for the description.

This class is important.

You live in a country that has a very overt fear of death. So much so that it is both trivialized, exploited, and not spoken of all at the same time.

So, I want to boldly start a conversation and an exploration into death.

We will explore what this fear has created in both this culture and you (if anything). You will deeply explore what you think/feel about death while you hear from your peers what they think and feel as well. You will research other cultures so you can get an idea of how these cultures treat death and the dead. We will hear from doctors about what actually happens to the body when it dies. I am trying to get an undertaker to come in and talk with you all about their job. We will also mediate in this class on death as well as life. We will look at poetry, stories, art, film, and so much more on the subject of death. We will examine grief as much as we examine love.

Your responsibility will be to try and be there while all this happens.
Your responsibility will be to work hard to discover what you believe.
You also have the responsibility to engage in the work of trying to discover what it means to you to have a good death and then take on the grail quest to deliver these revelations back to your classmates through a presented project.

You will write an essay, a short research paper, keep a journal, write reflections, learn about dreams and interpreting them, and do multiple projects throughout the course of this class.

We will read texts and look at how literature uses the dead, speaks of the dead, teaches us about dying.
We will watch films to see visuals of how death is taught, or not taught.

Your responsibility is to listen to your peers and do everything you can to learn from them and be compassionate.
Your ultimate responsibility is to become human and perhaps this is a good start.

Words of Many Colors
The Dark Knight Batman, 1st Semester 2019-20
Rm 102 : Tue/Thu 8:45-10:10

LA / 0.5

THIS IS AN ETHNIC STUDIES CLASS AND WILL FULFILL THE GRADUATION REQUIREMENT FOR IT.
ALSO, THIS IS PRIMARILY A READING CLASS. You have the possibility to read or listen to multiple pieces in this class, but you will be required to do the work in order to get credit. If you feel that a piece of writing is above your level, simply tell me, or your coordinator, or any one in this building, or your folks/guardians and have them tell me, and I will find you something that is at your level.
NO CELL PHONES ARE ALLOWED OUT IN THIS CLASS WITHOUT PERMISSION. YOU WILL BE COUNTED ABSENT FOR THE CLASS IF YOU TAKE IT OUT IN CLASS. IF YOU CAN’T HANDLE THAT THEN DO NOT SIGN UP FOR THIS CLASS.

This class will take the approach of ethnic studies through the critical lens of literature, poetry, play, and essay. We will read a few books, a couple plays, maybe see a few films, and have discussions. This will ultimately all lead to you creating an action project around being an antiracist.
This class will work exclusively toward decentering the White narrative. This means we will be exploring what dominant narratives are and how they affect our lives. We will be looking at critical narratives provided through the stories told by others. We will look at how People of Color have resisted and still resist the oppression and repressions that they have been subjugated to for the last 400 years in this culture. We will look at how unequal power, racism, and racist policies have served to create great wealth, as well as many other privileges, for certain people in this country.
Please expect to READ A LOT. We will do a lot of reading in class, where I read to you, but you will have to do some reading at home. I won’t make it a crazy amount of reading at home, but please understand you will have to take the time to do some at home. Again, when possible, you are more than welcome to listen to a book if that is easier for you. Watching a movie of the book is not the same thing since movies leave out many aspects of novels.
Here are some of the books we will be reading or reading from:

How to Be an AntiRacist – Ibram Kendi
The Truth about Stories – Thomas King
There There – Tommy Orange
The Hate U Give – Angie Thomas (Film too)
Exit West – Mosin Hamid
They Called Us Enemy (graphic novel) – George Takei
The White Card (play) – Claudine Rankin
Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom (play) – August Wilson
A Raisin in the Sun (play) – Lorraine Hansberry (Film too)

Please expect to do projects that reflect on who you are, where you come from, how you know what you know, and what you would do in certain situations pertaining to race. Ultimately, you will create an action project around social justice/antiracism, put it into effect, collect data on it and report back to the class on what you learned. This will be your final project of the class.

World Building
Debbie Kuttner, 1st Semester 2019-20
Rm 220 - Debbie's Room : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

LA - 11B Amer LIT & COMP / 0.5

Let’s read books! Wait, what is a book in the 21st century? Let’s look at a variety of genres (science fiction, fantasy, sci fi, dystopias, horror, alternate history, historical fiction, magical realism, and more). And while we are at it, let’s make our own worlds. Let’s build something we can all be proud of. Many people build worlds to write science fiction, but we will define worlds broadly so that we can explore creating in all kinds of genres.
Students will be expected to read, sometimes with ears, sometimes with eyes, and sometimes with both. Students will be expected to write, sometimes with mouth, and sometimes with fingers, and sometimes via small group of whole class