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Found 6 courses.

Science

Biology
Susan Barth, 1st Semester 2019-20
Susan's RM 3 : Mon/Wed/Fri 10:15-11:40

SC - Biology A / 0.5

Come explore Biology. This class will include, inquiry based science, research, modeling of systems and creating projects. You will hone your experimental skills, creating experiments to further your learning and expand your mind. This class will highlight Cell Biology topics. There will be terminology to learn and apply. As a Biologist, you will share your work with your peers and beyond.

Students will be expected to enter their work in the annual SNART Fair.

There will be a minimum of 2 hours of homework/studying per week. Be prepared to practice your study skills or build them if that is new to you. You will be expected to learn and apply study techniques.

This class will be offered for Biological Science credit. It’s expected that you have some science background. If you need a boost before this class, take Life, Labs and Learning.

Attendance: This class will follow the 8 absence attendance policy, although you should plan to attend class regularly, which will help keep you on top of things in this class.

Expectations _ You will be expected to show up and contribute to this class. This class will help you prepare for the Bio EOC

Chemistry
Eyva Winet, 1st Semester 2019-20
RM #120 : Mon/Tue/Wed/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

SC - Chemistry A / 0.5; SC - Chemistry B / 0.5

This course is an experiential journey through the essential themes, concepts, models, laboratory skills, mathematics and thinking processes that characterize a molecular understanding of the world. This class emphasizes creating a context for chemistry by understanding the history, philosophy, multi-ethnic perspectives, ethics, applications and relevance of chemistry. Chemistry is a study of the atomic theory, the structure of matter, bonding, nuclear chemistry, fuel chemistry, the periodic table, stoichiometry, reaction chemistry, equilibrium, kinetics, oxidation-reduction chemistry and more. These reactions and concepts explain and control the environment, product manufacturing, the human body, scientific arts like photography and ceramics, food, fermentation and combustion! Expect labs, color changes, burning stuff, and fun! We will also discuss pressing chemical issues and chemical ethics. There is math and writing in this course so get ready to use your whole brain!

Earthology
Adam Croft, 1st Semester 2019-20
Room 202 and beyond : Mon/Wed/Fri 8:45-10:10

SC - Earth Science / 0.5

Students will explore the science and history of the living Earth. In particular, we will pursue an understanding of Gaia Theory as developed by James Lovelock, Lynn Margulis, and other scientists. Students will be expected to develop a broad understanding of the dynamics of the living Earth while also taking on an inquiry and teaching project exploring a particular aspect of Gaia.

Scope and sequence:

I. What is happening here on Earth? How do we find answers to this question? [observe, research, experiment, model]
a. Explore current status of:
i. Lithosphere: rocks, soils, tectonic plates, volcanoes, earthquakes, etc.;
ii. Hydrosphere: oceans (acidification, over-fishing, sea-level rise), fresh water (rivers, lakes);
iii. Cryosphere: ice caps, ocean ice, glaciers, mountain snow/ice;
iv. Atmosphere: carbon dioxide, pollution (sulfur, nitrogen, particulates, etc.), temperature ;
v. Biosphere : habitat destruction, deforestation, mass extinction, invasive species, etc.
b. Project: model an Earth system and how it is changing.

II. How did it get to be this way? How did it used to be? [research, experiment, design]
a. Explore history and dynamics of each Gaia-sphere
b. Project: design a life-supporting planet fundamentally different than the Earth.

III. How could it be again? What can we do as responsible participants in the Earth? How can social justice (ie. Black Lives Matter, NoDAPL Water Protectors, Occupy, etc.) interconnect with Earth justice?
a. Research and discuss key questions related to application of Earth knowledge in conjunction with social justice
b. Project: action-research project linking social and Earth justice.

IV. Final portfolio:
a. Guiding questions:
i. What have you accomplished?
ii. What have you learned?
iii. What are you still pondering?
iv. What are you still struggling over?
v. What will you take with you from this experience?
b. Portfolio:
i. Collected works from the semester
ii. Written reflection on above questions

Environmental Justice
Adam Croft, 1st Semester 2019-20
Room 202 and beyond : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

SC - Science Seminar / 0.5

Students will explore the relations of human groups and places. In this course, we will question, challenge, analyze, and create the relations between humans and the Earth and how these relations have changed throughout human/Earth history. Most class topics will be determined by the course participants, though we will continue to relate these histories to those of the place within which this course is situated: Seattle, Puget Sound, Washington, Pacific Northwest, North America, …

In particular, we will seek to understand and create an ethic of place. Students will leave the course with a set of questions and understandings to help guide future relations between people and place.


WA State History credit is available for this course.*

Questions to be addressed by students participating in this course include:
- how have humans lived in this and other places?
- how are humans currently living in this and other places?
- how could humans live in this and other places?
- how does the Earth live in this and other places upon the Earth?
- what is the state of the planet and its life today?
- how is health/pollution distributed across the planet today and in this place?
- how has the climate crisis come about, and what is its relation to this place?
- how are/will these changes affect(ing) communities differently depending upon race, class, gender, age, sexuality, ability, etc.?
- how are/will these changes affect(ing) plants, animals, ecosystems, oceans, and the living planet (Gaia)?
- what does environmental justice look like in this and other places?
- what does a healthy human civilization living with and upon a healthy planet look like, in this and other places?

Life on Earth
Adam Croft, 1st Semester 2019-20
Room 202 and beyond : Tue/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

SC - Biology B / 0.5

Students will explore the science and history of life on Earth. Students will be expected to develop a broad understanding of the dynamics of life on Earth while also taking on an inquiry and teaching project exploring a particular aspect of Earth’s life. This course will also prepare students for half of the Biology EOC competencies.

Scope and sequence:

I. What is life? How do we answer such a question? [research, classify, design]
a. Zones of exploration
i. Definition of life;
ii. Requirements for life;
iii. Classification of life.
b. Project: Design a viable creature.

II. How do organisms live together? How do we study these interactions? [research, observe, design, experiment]
a. Zones of exploration
i. Ecological relations;
ii. Human-induced changes.
b. Project: Design and conduct a field study.

III. How do organisms change over time? How do we know? [research, scheme]
a. Zones of exploration
i. Evolution by natural selection;
ii. Examples of evolution;
iii. Human evolution.
b. Project: Plausible evolution of creature.

IV. Biology EOC: practice and review

V. Final portfolio:
a. Guiding questions:
i. What have you accomplished?
ii. What have you learned?
iii. What are you still pondering?
iv. What are you still struggling over?
v. What will you take with you from this experience?
b. Portfolio:
i. Collected works from the semester
ii. Written reflection on above questions

Life, Labs and Learning
Susan Barth, 1st Semester 2019-20
Room #B3 : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

SC - Life Science 1 / 0.5


This is an introductory Life Science class. If you already have experimental/lab skills and knowledge in topics like DNA, photosynthesis and genetics, then please take Biology.

This class is for people who like living things, but have not had a lot of experience with studying them. We will be doing experiments in biological topics, learning to ask scientific questions, creating experiments, collecting data and completing lab reports. We will use microscopes, balances and other lab equipment. We will focus on some major topics: Lab Safety and Skills, Critical Thinking in Biology, Ecosystems and Conservation, Study Skills. This class will cover tiny to big Biology. You will explore citizen science projects (Citizen science projects can earn service learning credit), research scientists and current events. Ever wonder what’s in pond water or how forests rely on fungus to survive? Let’s find out. This class will be great for those who are science shy or inexperienced. This is a great prerequisite for Biology, unless you can show that you have some solid experience in these areas to your coordinator.