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Found 7 courses.

Social Studies

AGE on Earth
Adam Croft, 1st Semester 2019-20
room 202 and beyond : Mon/Wed/Fri 12:20-13:45

SS - American Government & Economics / 0.5

We’ll work together to learn how best to explore and confront US systems of governance and economics. How do we participate in government policy making and enforcement? What are methods of social change people and movements have used outside of government institutions? How can our governance and economy responsibly relate to (and even heal) the living Earth systems upon which we all depend?

Be prepared to question, research, take action, reflect, and educate, both within and outside of the Nova community.

Students will learn how to write, research for, and complete a Constitutional Issues Competency-Based Assessment (the “CBA”, a short paper examining a Constitutional issue) that is a state requirement for graduation. ALSO: through this class, interested seniors may complete their culminating social justice inquiry project, and juniors can get a head start!

Course expectations include the following:

COMMUNITY & SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY:
- Student will participate in collective, democratic processes
- Be able to sit with, hold space for, and respect viewpoints different than your own while continuing to think independently
- Listen to the ideas of others and contribute your own ideas
- Take action that contributes meaningfully to the community
- Student will work to cause no harm to self, other beings and the environments we inhabit and will take responsibility for harm that you cause to self, other beings and their environments, regardless of intention
- Student will develop an understanding of systemic harm
- Student will develop an understanding of the inter-connectedness of systemic harm
- Student will take action to change systems that cause systemic harm

American Government and Economics
Brian Aytch, 1st Semester 2019-20
122 : Tue/Thu/Fri 12:20-13:45

None assigned

Human Geography (WH/Ethnic Studies)
Melissa Park, 1st Semester 2019-20
Melissa's room / Rm 101 : Tue/Thu/Fri 10:15-11:40

SS - Ethnic Studies / 0.5

THIS IS AN ETHNIC STUDIES CLASS AND WILL FULFILL THE GRADUATION REQUIREMENT FOR IT.

Human Geography is a shiny new world history & ethnic studies class that aims to take a decolonized approach to studying the how’s and why’s of movements (migrations) of peoples on the planet in past eras through today. How did those movements shape history and ideas of home (what is home?), nation, who gets to belong, who doesn’t belong, and how is the latter group treated as a result of the rules of who gets to belong? How have power and oppression shaped people’s identities, and your own? How have constant human stories of resistance and striving for liberation shaped people’s identities, and your own? How have people held onto cultural traditions, knowledge of family, ancestors, sense of self, if/when they must—or choose to—or are forced to—pick up and leave? What gets lost in the leaving? What is gained? What does it mean to be “from” a place? What does it mean if your people don’t have a physical homeland?

This history class will not focus on memorizing names, dates, and places. Instead, it will challenge students to think deeply about historic trends and tensions within human society. We’ll approach history as a contested subject, one in which a multitude of stories from different perspectives must be weighed and considered as we search for the truth of the origins for why things are the way they are in 2019. We’ll ask what sorts of power do groups of people have, and what ways does power flow? In studying various time periods, we’ll constantly question everything about what it means to be a human who belongs, and critical & dominant narratives about who is seen as a human (and treated accordingly). By the end of the semester, students should be able to construct cohesive narratives that connect current events to past stories.

We will also have lots of fun with maps! Maps act as backdrops for statements about politically imposed boundaries, territoriality, and other notions of power and projection. They can also act as metaphors for seeking location and experiencing dislocation, charting new terrain, exploring ratios to scale, and bringing order to chaos.

  • We will study maps (e.g. how have world borders changed through war, colonialism, and immigration, etc.? Perhaps we’ll shake our heads at outdated ways of grouping people, and take real stock of our version of this/how we are doing it today, and what will future humans think of how we view/treat our world’s land, resources, and inhabitants?).
  • We will make maps (e.g. we’ll try some experimental mapping of things/experiences/ways of being in our own lives today; perhaps we’ll develop a local participatory mapping project to collaborate on with others outside of the class?).
  • We will complete map-based projects as ways of working through some of the above questions (e.g. we’ll explore psychogeography which explores systems and relationships rather than imagery; explore mapping psychological terrain rather than geographical features. In this way maps may be really interesting tools for us to examine critical and dominant narratives.)

PLEASE REMEMBER, NO CELL PHONES ARE ALLOWED IN THE CLASS. SERIOUSLY. DO NOT SIGN UP FOR THIS CLASS IF YOU CAN’T HANDLE THIS. (You will be marked absent if your phone is out during class.)

ATTENDANCE: For 0.5 credit, students can miss up to six classes (excused or unexcused) until they need to complete projects to make up for missed community competencies. Students will have multiple options to demonstrate they’ve met these missed competencies.

US History Intensive
Melissa Park, 1st Semester 2019-20
Melissa's Room / Moon 101 : Mon/Tue/Wed/Thu/Fri 8:45-10:10

SS - US History 11A / 0.5; SS - US History 11B / 0.5

THIS CLASS MEETS DAILY, MON THRU FRI!

This U.S. History intensive will use reading, writing, costumes, debates, storytelling, role plays, theater, videos, and classroom research to engage ourselves in a process of exploring early U.S. history through the present day. We’ll critically examine the story of where our country came from by analyzing art, children’s books, movies, and political propaganda, and compare the real history with some of the national myths we’ve created. We’ll study topics that rarely make it into high school history texts, e.g., settler-colonialism in the Americas, slavery’s essential role in the founding of the country (and its ongoing legacies), an early history of gender and sexuality, the legacy of class struggles, and how race was created.

This history class will not focus on memorizing names, dates, and places. Instead, it will challenge students to think deeply about historic trends and tensions within U.S. society. We’ll approach history as a contested subject, one in which a multitude of stories from different perspectives must be weighed and considered as we search for the truth of the origins for why things are the way they are in 2019’s America. We’ll ask what sorts of power do groups of American people have, and what ways does power flow? In studying various time periods, we’ll constantly question everything about what it means to be American and critical & dominant narratives about who is American. By the end of the semester, students should be able to construct cohesive narratives that connect current events to early U.S. history.

We’ll put a strong emphasis on developing history skills, including researching primary and secondary resources, spotting/evaluating bias, and developing critical and supported arguments. All students are eligible to earn honors credit, which will involve reading/listening to and working with Ibram X. Kendi’s Stamped From the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America.

Tentative units/portfolios for this semester are:
• Indigeneity, the Americas, and Settler-Colonialism
• 1619, Slavery & the Story of Race, Founding Myths of America
• Slavery & American Capitalism, the American Revolution, and the Constitution
• Abolitionism, Reconstruction, & “democracy”
• Industrialization, Progressivism, Imperialism & “the nadir of race relations”
• Migration, Immigration & the American Dream
• Civil Rights then & now
• Vietnam, the Cold War, & global power

IMPORTANT: This is not one of those classes that has no homework. This is an upper level class, meaning that I’ll frequently require you to read, write, reflect, watch documentaries, and work on group projects outside of class. I try to space work out and be kind, but if you blow off the work, you’ll get behind and overwhelmed. You will not receive US History credit without completing the work outside of class. PLEASE KNOW that I am SO down to help you whenever and however I can so you can be successful in your learning and credit-earning in this class! Also, this IS a class in which interested seniors (and juniors wanting to get a head start) may complete their culminating social justice inquiry project.

PLEASE REMEMBER, NO CELL PHONES ARE ALLOWED IN THE CLASS. SERIOUSLY. DO NOT SIGN UP FOR THIS CLASS IF YOU CAN’T HANDLE THIS. (You will be marked absent if your phone is out during class.)

ATTENDANCE: For 1.0 credit, students can miss up to ten classes (excused or unexcused) until they need to complete projects to make up for missed community competencies. Students will have multiple options to demonstrate they’ve met these missed competencies.

Washington State History
Adam Croft, 1st Semester 2019-20
Schoology and the city

None assigned

Students will explore the history of the state of Washington through the following topical strands:
- Social justice;
- Oral histories;
- First nations;
- Civics and government structures;
- Geography;
- Earth and ecological history and dynamics;
- Economics.

• The class awards 0.25 WA State History credit. This counts as elective credit and fulfills the WA State History graduation requirement.
• There will be a 30 minute in-person orientation that every student must attend to be enrolled. We’ve got two options for that: Thursday, February 18th and Friday, February 19th. On both days, the orientation will happen at 2:30 in the computer lab. If students register for the class later in the semester, they’ll organize a one-on-one orientation with me or Adam.
• The class will be run entirely through Schoology, with all assignments posted there and turned in there.
• The class will require students to travel places around town (such as neighborhoods, parks, and museums) to complete some assignments.
• Students will be required to complete an online check-in at a minimum each week. This online check-in is our equivalent of attendance.
• Students are encouraged to collaborate and complete assignments together, but can also do them solo if they’d like.

World Economics 1
Brian Aytch, 1st Semester 2019-20
122 : Mon/Wed 10:15-11:40

None assigned

The objective of this course is to examine world history by analyzing economics trends that have shaped today’s societies and nations. This course will explore topics such as trade, migration, employment, free markets and other macroeconomic factors. This class will also focus on geography and natural resources. This course is intended for freshman.

World Economics 2
Brian Aytch, 1st Semester 2019-20
122

None assigned

The objective of this course is to examine world history by analyzing economics trends that have shaped today’s societies and nations. This course will explore topics such as trade, migration, employment, free markets and other macroeconomic factors. This class will also focus on geography and natural resources. Students in this course will analyze the U.S. Stock Market and it’s impact on world trade. China, India, Mexico and other important trade partners will be examined in this course. This course is intended for juniors and seniors.